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Modeling Food Processing Operations. Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition

  • ID: 3084375
  • Book
  • April 2015
  • Elsevier Science and Technology

Computational modeling is an important tool for understanding and improving food processing and manufacturing. It is used for many different purposes, including process design and process optimization. However, modeling goes beyond the process and can include applications to understand and optimize food storage and the food supply chain, and to perform a life cycle analysis. Modeling Food Processing Operations provides a comprehensive overview of the various applications of modeling in conventional food processing. The needs of industry, current practices, and state-of-the-art technologies are examined, and case studies are provided.

Part One provides an introduction to the topic, with a particular focus on modeling and simulation strategies in food processing operations. Part Two reviews the modeling of various food processes involving heating and cooling. These processes include: thermal inactivation; sterilization and pasteurization; drying; baking; frying; and chilled and frozen food processing, storage and display. Part Three examines the modeling of multiphase unit operations such as membrane separation, extrusion processes and food digestion, and reviews models used to optimize food distribution.

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Preface Part One: Introduction to computational modeling in food processing 1 Different modeling and simulation approaches for food processing operations C. Rauh, Technical University of Berlin, Germany and A. Delgado, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany Part Two: Modeling of food processes involving heating and cooling 2 Thermal processing and kinetic modeling of inactivation K. Dolan, Michigan State University, USA, H. Habtegebriel, Ecole Supérieure d'Agriculture, France, V. Valdramidis, University of Malta, Malta and D. Mishra, Mead Johnson Nutrition, USA 3 Modeling thermal processing and reactions: sterilization to pasteurization R. Simpson, H. Nuñez and S. Almonacid, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Chile 4 Modeling of drying processes of food materials H. Sabarez, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia 5 Modeling of baking processes D. Flick and C. Doursat, AgroParistech, France and D. Grenier and T. Lucas, Irstea, France 6 Modeling of food frying processes S. Eichenlaub and C. Koh, PepsiCo Global R&D, USA 7 Modelling of cold food chain processing and display environments S. A. Tassou, B. L. Gowreesunker, D. Parpas and A. Raeisi, Brunel University London, UK Part Three: Modeling of multiphase unit operations 8 A review of shear induced particle migration for enhanced filtration and fractionation R. M. Klaver and C. G. P. H. Schroën, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 9 Modelling extrusion processes M. A. Emin, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany 10 Modelling food digestion P. W. Cleary and M. D. Sinnott, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia, B. Hari and S. Bakalis, The University of Birmingham, UK and S. M. Harrison, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia 11 (18) Using logistic models to optimize the food supply chain R. García-Flores, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia, O. V. de Souza Filho and R. S. Martins, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil, C. V. B. Martins, Unioeste, Brazil and P. Juliano, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia Part Four: Conclusions 12 Conclusions and future trends in modelling food process operations S. Bakalis, The University of Birmingham, UK, Kai Knoerzer, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia and Peter J. Fryer, The University of Birmingham, UK
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Serafim Bakalis Professor, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, UK.

Professor Serafim Bakalis is a professor in the School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, UK
Kai Knoerzer Principal Research Scientist/Engineer, CSIRO Agriculture and Food.

Dr. Kai Knoerzer has a background in process engineering (BSc), chemical engineering (MSc), and food process engineering (PhD, summa cum laude), all awarded from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). In 2006, he commenced work with Food Science Australia (a joint venture of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Victorian Government) as a postdoctoral fellow. He has since become a principal research scientist in CSIRO Agriculture and Food. Kai has a proven track record in food process engineering research and development, particularly of innovative technologies. Currently, he is leading research activities on engineering aspects (e.g., numerical modelling, simulation, process/equipment design, and optimization, as well as scale-up) across a number of innovative food processing technologies, such as high pressure (thermal), pulsed electric field, and ultrasonics/megasonics processing. Kai's work has shown both science impact, with more than 90 peer-reviewed journal publications, conference proceedings and book chapters, 6 patent applications, four edited books, and over 90 oral and 50 poster presentations at national and international conferences, as well as commercial impact in the food industry. His work has also been recognized with various international awards for research excellence. Kai has been an active member of IFT's International Division in the leadership team for a number of years and is past chair of this division. He edited Elsevier's Innovative Food Processing Technologies: Extraction, Separation, Component Modification and Process Intensification (2016) and two volumes in the Food Science, Technology and Nutrition series: Modeling Food Processing Operations (2015) and The Microwave Processing of Foods (2016). He is also Subject Editor for the "Food Process Engineering” section of Elsevier's Reference Module in Food Science. He has an h-index of 18.
Peter J Fryer Professor of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, UK.

Professor Peter Fryer is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Birmingham, UK.
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