Protest in Putin's Russia

  • ID: 3610124
  • Book
  • Region: Russia
  • 300 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The Russian protests, sparked by the 2011 Duma election, have been widely portrayed as a colourful but inconsequential middle–class rebellion, confined to Moscow and organized by an unpopular opposition. In this sweeping new account of the protests, Mischa Gabowitsch challenges these journalistic clichés, showing that they stem from wishful thinking and media bias rather than from accurate empirical analysis. Drawing on a rich body of material, he analyses the biggest wave of demonstrations since the end of the Soviet Union, situating them in the context of protest and social movements across Russia as a whole. He also explores the legacy of the protests in the new era after Ukraine’s much larger Maidan protests, the crises in Crimea and the Donbass, and Putin’s ultra–conservative turn.

As the first full–length study of the Russian protests, this book will be of great value to students and scholars of Russia and to anyone interested in contemporary social movements and political protest.

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Chapter 1. Introduction: March of Millions
Chapter 2. Putin’s Regimes
Chapter 3. Insurgent Observers
Chapter 4. Scenes and Solidarities: Opposition and Grassroots Protest Before 2011–13
Chapter 5. Crossed Purposes: Opposition and Grassroots Protestors in the 2011–13 Protest Wave
Chapter 6. Pussy Riot and Beyond: Art, Religion and Gender Regimes in Russian Protest
Chapter 7. Cognitive Spaces of Protest
Chapter 8. The Transnational Dimension
Chapter 9. Conclusion: Protest in Putin’s third term
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Mischa Gabowitsch
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