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Cardiac Regeneration and Repair

  • ID: 3744592
  • Book
  • October 2017
  • Region: Global
  • 448 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
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Cardiac Regeneration and Repair, Volume One reviews the pathology of cardiac injury and the latest advances in cell therapy.

Chapters in part one explore the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure, the mechanisms responsible for adverse cardiac matrix remodeling, and potential interventions to restore ventricular function. Part two highlights new approaches to cell therapy for cardiac regeneration, and includes chapters covering alternative routes of cell delivery, monitoring cell engraftment, and the feasibility of using allogeneic stem cells to restore cardiac function. Chapters in part three move on to highlight novel stem cells for cardiac repair, including human embryonic stem cells and human pluripotent stem cells, and detail their current status and future potential for cardiac therapy. Finally, part four explores gene therapy, and includes ultrasound-targeted or direct gene delivery as well as cell-based gene therapy for cardiac regeneration.

Cardiac Regeneration and Repair, Volume One is complemented by a second volume covering biomaterials and tissue engineering. Together, the two volumes of Cardiac Regeneration and Repair provide a comprehensive resource for clinicians, scientists, or academicians fascinated with cardiac regeneration, including those interested in cell therapy, tissue engineering, or biomaterials.

- Explores the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure, the mechanisms responsible for adverse cardiac matrix remodeling, and potential interventions to restore ventricular function
- Highlights new approaches to cell therapy for cardiac regeneration and includes chapters covering alternative routes of cell delivery, monitoring cell engraftment, and the feasibility of using allogeneic stem cells to restore cardiac function
- Explores gene therapy and includes ultrasound-targeted or direct gene delivery as well as cell-based gene therapy for cardiac regeneration
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Contributor contact details
Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
Foreword
Introduction
Part I: The pathogenesis of congestive heart failure
Chapter 1: Cardiac matrix remodeling and heart failure
Abstract:
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Cardiac matrix remodeling in the development and progression of heart failure (HF) after myocardial infarction (MI)
1.3 Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in matrix and cardiac remodeling
1.4 Role of inflammation in matrix and cardiac remodeling
1.5 Role of monocytes and macrophages in matrix and cardiac remodeling
1.6 Extracellular matrix (ECM) and collagen deposition
1.7 Treatment strategies and considerations
1.8 Future trends
1.9 Acknowledgments
Chapter 2: Cardiac biomechanics and heart dysfunction
Abstract:
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Measures of cardiac biomechanics
2.3 Techniques for assessing the parameters used to quantify cardiac function
2.4 Passive versus active cardiac function
2.5 Effects of ischemia and infarction on cardiac biomechanics
2.6 Conclusion
Chapter 3: Modifying matrix remodeling to prevent heart failure
Abstract:
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Clinical progress and remaining issues
3.3 Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in the post-myocardial infarction setting
3.4 Cells that modify ECM remodeling
3.5 Therapeutic options
3.6 Future trends
3.7 Conclusion
3.8 Sources of further information and advice
3.9 Acknowledgements
Part II: Cell therapy for cardiac regeneration and repair
Chapter 4: Optimal cells for cardiac repair and regeneration
Abstract:
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Cell candidates for the repair of ischemic myocardium
4.3 Mechanisms of stem cell transplantation for myocardium repair
4.4 Overview of the centers for cardiac cell transplantation
4.5 Conclusion and future trends
4.7 Appendix: abbreviations and acronyms
Chapter 5: Cell delivery routes for cardiac stem cell therapy
Abstract:
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Intravenous (IV) injection for cell therapy to the heart
5.3 Intramyocardial (IM) injection for cell therapy to the heart
5.4 Intracoronary (IC) injection for cell therapy to the heart
5.5 Advanced methods for cell therapy to the heart: tissue engineering and the cell-sheet technique
5.6 Conclusion and future trends
5.7 Acknowledgment
Chapter 6: Cell therapy to regenerate the ischemic heart
Abstract:
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Pathology of ischemic damage
6.3 Goals and mechanisms of cell therapy to regenerate the ischemic heart
6.4 Candidate populations for cell therapy
6.5 Variables of cell therapy
6.6 Conclusion
Chapter 7: Cell therapy for cardiac repair
bench to bedside and back
Abstract:
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Transition of stem cell therapeutics from the bench to the clinic
7.3 Skeletal myoblasts
7.4 Hematological stem cell (HSC) products
7.5 Conclusion
Chapter 8: Recent advances in cardiac stem cell therapy to restore left ventricular function
Abstract:
8.1 Introduction
8.2 The disputed existence of cardiac stem cells (CSCs)
8.3 Therapeutic application of CSCs to restore ventricular function
8.4 Future trends
8.5 Conclusion
Chapter 9: Monitoring myocardial functional regeneration following cardiac stem cell application
Abstract:
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Conventional functional monitoring modalities following cardiac cell application
9.3 Evolving imaging modalities for the assessment of myocardial regeneration
9.4 Conclusion and future trends
Chapter 10: Feasibility of allogeneic stem cells for heart regeneration
Abstract:
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Characteristics and isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)
10.3 In vivo studies of allogeneic MSCs
10.4 Mechanisms of allogeneic MSC therapy
10.5 Future trends
10.6 Sources of further information and advice
Chapter 11: Bone marrow cells and their role in cardiac repair after myocardial infarction
Abstract:
11.1 Heart disease in the United States
11.2 History of bone marrow stem cells
11.3 Stem cell niche in the bone marrow
11.4 Delivery of bone marrow stem cells to the heart
11.5 Clinical trials of bone marrow stem cell therapy
11.6 Limitations of bone marrow stem cell therapy
11.7 Conclusion
Part III: Stem cells for cardiac regeneration and repair
Chapter 12: Cardiac cell therapy to restore contracting elements
Abstract:
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Contractile elements and their importance in normal cardiac function
12.3 Evidence that cellular therapies can restore cardiac contractility
12.4 Future trends
12.5 Sources of further information and advice
Chapter 13: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for heart regeneration
Abstract:
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Rationale for using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to treat severe heart failure
13.3 ESCs for severe heart failure: preclinical data
13.4 ESCs for severe heart failure: specific translational issues
13.5 Issues common to all cell therapy products
13.6 Future trends
13.7 Conclusion
13.8 Sources of further information and advice
Chapter 14: Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) for heart regeneration
Abstract:
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Background to cardiovascular disease and cardiac remodeling and repair
14.3 Cardiovascular developmental bioengineering
14.4 Cardiac disease modeling with human induced pluripotent stem cells
14.5 Conclusion
Chapter 15: Cardiac cell therapy: current status and future trends
Abstract:
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Current cell delivery methods
15.3 Cell types for cardiac regeneration
15.4 In vivo cell tracking
15.5 Evaluation of heart function
15.6 Cardiac cell therapy issues
15.7 Future trends
Part IV: Gene therapy for cardiac regeneration and repair
Chapter 16: Stem cell and gene therapy for cardiac regeneration
Abstract:
16.1 Introduction
16.2 Non-cardiac progenitor cells
16.3 Cardiac stem cells (CSCs)
16.4 Mechanisms of cardiac regeneration
16.5 Mechanisms of cardiac gene transfer
16.6 Conclusion and future trends
Chapter 17: Ultrasound-targeted cardiovascular gene therapy
Abstract:
17.1 Introduction
17.2 Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery (UMGD)
17.3 Microbubble carrier agents
17.4 Gene/nucleic acid vectors
17.5 Ultrasound and bioeffects
17.6 Experimental considerations and protocols
17.7 Therapeutic applications of UMGD
17.8 Future trends
Index
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Li, Ren-Ke
Ren-Ke Li, University of Toronto, Canada.
Weisel, Richard D.
Richard D. Weisel, University of Toronto, Canada.
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