+353-1-416-8900REST OF WORLD
+44-20-3973-8888REST OF WORLD
1-917-300-0470EAST COAST U.S
1-800-526-8630U.S. (TOLL FREE)

PRINTER FRIENDLY

Integrating Program Management and Systems Engineering. Methods, Tools, and Organizational Systems for Improving Performance

  • ID: 3757849
  • Book
  • Region: Global
  • 456 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
1 of 3

"A great contribution to systems engineering and project management, this book lays out the fundamental challenges of integrating these two disciplines and offers well–written practical guidance on how to address those challenges. This is the most comprehensive examination I have seen on the ties between systems engineering and program management."
Dr. Art Pyster, Professor and Associate Dean for Research Volgenau School of Engineering, George Mason University

"The integration of program management and systems engineering is the vital mixture for success of complex organization and societal challenges. This was the critical ingredient for the Apollo mission, and it is urgently needed for today′s fast–paced and networked world. This is an indispensable book for those seeking evidence–based research and results."
Edward J. Hoffman, Ph.D, former, Chief Knowledge Officer NASA and Executive in Residence, Columbia University, School of Professional Studies

"Through real life cases and examples, this book makes the case for genuine integration of program management and systems engineering. It shows how a combination of shared vision, responsiveness to change, empowerment of teams and technical competence lead to value realization when dealing with complex socio–technical systems. A must–read book!"
Michel Thiry, Ph.D, FAPM, PMI Fellow

Achieve Greater Performance by Integrating your Key Program Functions

Integrating Program Management and Systems Engineering makes the case for achieving significant program and project improvements through the strategic integration of program managers and system engineers.

Developed through an alliance between the Project Management Institute (PMI), International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), and the Consortium for Engineering Program Excellence (CEPE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), this integrated approach and framework offers path of successful practices for creating better solutions. This guidebook presents a diverse group of contributors in program management, systems engineering, and academia, who share their collective knowledge of best approaches to improving program results through a unified working relationship between program managers and systems engineers. From defining the integrated goal to making a successful transition, everything you need is inside, including:

  • Tools for assessing your current capabilities and building up to custom fit your organizational needs
  • Proven tactics to improve cost, schedule, and technical performance of programs and projects
  • Innovative techniques for managing risk through every stage of integration and performance improvement

Break through the silos in your organization and accomplish more together with Integrating Program Management and Systems Engineering.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 3

List of Figures xxvii

List of Tables xxxiii

Foreword: Practices, Knowledge, and Innovation xxxv

Preface xxxix

Reference xli

Acknowledgments xliii

Introduction xlvii

The Origins of an Important Collaboration xlvii

Creating a Knowledge Foundation through Exploratory Research xlviii

Phase I Study xlix

Phase II and III Studies l

Phase IV Study li

Strengths and Limitations of the Research Foundation lii

Integrating Practitioner Knowledge with Research lii

Overview of the Book liii

References liv

PART I: IN SEARCH OF INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS 1

1 TOWARD A NEW MINDSET 3

1.1 Striving for Perfection in Complex Work 3

1.2 Boldly Going Again Where People Have Gone Before 4

1.3 Strategy Realization Requires Good Management 8

1.4 Workforce + Organizational Capabilities = Competitive Advantage 10

1.5 Rays of Hope 12

1.6 Trekking toward a New Mindset 12

1.7 Summary 14

1.8 Discussion Questions 14

1.9 References 14

2 THE ENGINEERING PROGRAM PERFORMANCE CHALLENGE 17

2.1 Introduction 17

2.2 Making White Elephants Extinct 17

2.3 Large Engineering Programs Are Complex 20

2.4 We Need a Better Solution 31

2.5 Summary 31

2.6 Discussion Questions 33

2.7 References 33

Additional Resources 36

3 THE FEATURES OF SUCCESSFUL INTEGRATION OF PROGRAM MANAGEMENT AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 37

3.1 A Major Engineering Program Failure? 37

3.2 Bridging Boundaries to Foster Program Success 40

3.3 Contributors to Success in Action 42

3.4 Summary 47

3.5 Discussion Questions 48

3.6 References 48

Additional Resources 49

4 THE CASE FOR INTEGRATING PROGRAM MANAGEMENT AND TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT 51

4.1 The Roots of Nonintegration 51

4.2 Program Management and Systems Engineering Are Different 52

4.3 Program Management 53

4.4 Systems Engineering 62

4.5 Why Divergence Is Such a Problem 69

4.6 Integrating Is Difficult, but Not Impossible 75

4.7 Discussion Questions 76

4.8 References 76

Additional Resources 78

5 KEY CONCEPTS IN INTEGRATION 79

5.1 Introduction 79

5.2 Assessing Integration between Disciplines 79

5.3 Attributes of Integration in Complex Organizations 83

5.4 Practitioner Perspectives on Integration 88

5.5 Summary 93

5.6 Discussion Questions 94

5.7 References 95

PART II: BUILDING CAPABILITIES TO EFFECTIVELY EXECUTE ENGINEERING PROGRAMS 97

6 HOW INTEGRATION WORKS IN PROGRAMS 99

6.1 Introduction 99

6.2 The Integration Framework 99

6.3 Summary 115

6.4 Discussion Questions 115

6.5 References 116

7 INTEGRATION IN PRACTICE IN THE F/A–18E/F SUPER HORNET PROGRAM 119

7.1 Introduction 119

7.2 F/A–18E/F Super Hornet Program Background and the Context of Integration 121

7.3 Twelve Days of August: A Start on the Integration Journey 122

7.4 Enabling Integration by Reducing Program Complexity 124

7.5 A Parallel Process in NAVAIR to Improve Integration 125

7.6 The E/F Program Pilots a New Way of Working Together 126

7.7 Improved Decision Making 128

7.8 Program Delivery 138

7.9 Integration Practices Observed in the F/A–18E/F Program 140

7.10 Summary 140

7.11 Discussion Questions 141

7.12 References 142

8 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING INTEGRATION PROCESSES, PRACTICES, AND TOOLS 143

8.1 Introduction 143

8.2 Episodic Integration Mechanisms 144

8.3 Pervasive Integration Mechanisms 151

8.4 A Note on Tailoring 164

8.5 Summary 165

8.6 Discussion Questions 166

8.7 References 166

Additional Resources 168

9 THE ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT 169

9.1 Introduction 169

9.2 Structural Dimensions of Integration 169

9.3 Organizational Environmental Factors 174

9.4 The Challenges of Integration in Large–Scale Programs: Systems Failure 178

9.5 Characteristics of Successful Program Integration 180

9.6 The International Space Station: A Model in Systems Integration 182

9.7 Summary 185

9.8 Discussion Questions 186

9.9 References 186

Additional Resources 189

10 DEVELOPING INTEGRATION COMPETENCIES IN PEOPLE 191

10.1 Introduction 191

10.2 Identifying Integration Competencies 194

10.3 Developing Integration Competencies 198

10.4 Managing Integration Competencies 207

10.5 Summary 210

10.6 Discussion Questions 211

10.7 References 211

Additional Resources 215

11 INTEGRATION THROUGHOUT THE PROGRAM LIFE CYCLE 217

11.1 Introduction 217

11.2 Integration and the Generic Life Cycle 217

11.3 Life Cycle Stages for Systems Engineering 219

11.4 Program Management Life Cycle Characteristics 220

11.5 Large–Scale Infrastructure Programs 225

11.6 Life Cycle Integration 227

11.7 Leadership Styles for the Big Dig s Five Stages of Program Management 232

11.8 Summary 233

11.9 Discussion Questions 233

11.10 References 234

Additional Resources 236

12 THE IMPACT OF EFFECTIVE INTEGRATION ON PROGRAM PERFORMANCE 237

12.1 Introduction 237

12.2 Program Performance 237

12.3 Measuring Integration in Programs 240

12.4 Integration as a Catalyst for Program Performance 244

12.5 Case Study: Electronic Support Upgrade for the Royal Australian Navy s Anzac Class Frigate 249

12.6 Summary 255

12.7 Discussion Questions 256

12.8 References 256

PART III: DEVELOPING INTEGRATION COMPETENCIES IN YOUR ORGANIZATION 259

13 INTEGRATION MEANS CHANGE 261

13.1 Introduction: The Case for Change 261

13.2 The Need to Be Thoughtful about Change 262

13.3 Frameworks and Models for Change 265

13.4 Readiness Assessment 271

13.5 The Road Ahead and How to Prepare for It 273

13.6 Summary 273

13.7 Discussion Questions 274

13.8 References 275

Additional Resources 276

14 SUCCESSFUL CHANGE PROGRAMS THAT IMPROVED INTEGRATION 279

14.1 Introduction 279

14.2 Redefining What Is Possible: The Marriage of Systems Engineering and Program Management at Lockheed Missiles & Space Company 280

14.3 Using Certification to Foster Integration in U.S. Government Agency Acquisition Programs 284

14.4 Integrating Software Engineering and Program Management at Nationwide 287

14.5 Managing Change in Engineering Program Organizations: Boosting Productivity in BMW s Engineering Department 291

14.6 Delivering the World s Most Complex Inner–City Infrastructure Program: Boston s Big Dig 299

14.7 Summary 303

14.8 Discussion Questions 305

14.9 References 306

15 LEADING AN INTEGRATION CHANGE PROGRAM 309

15.1 Introduction 309

15.2 Understanding the Work Ahead: The Organizational Context 310

15.3 Planning for Change within the Organizational Context 312

15.4 Putting the Four Input Dimensions for Change Together 329

15.5 Practices to Consider 334

15.6 Summary 338

15.7 References 339

PART IV: A CALL TO ACTION 341

16 CALLS TO ACTION 343

16.1 Call to Action for Academia: Help Budding Professionals Learn to Adapt 344

16.2 Call to Action for Enterprise: Build the Right Engine for Strategy Implementation 349

16.3 Call to Action for Policymakers: Refocus Oversight and Accountability in the Right Ways 353

16.4 Call to Action for Industry and Professional Societies: Take an Interdisciplinary View 357

16.5 Call to Action for Researchers: Explore Interdisciplinary Systems 359

16.6 References 361

AFTERWORD: TOWARD AN INTEGRATED FUTURE 365

The Case for Integration 365

New Insights Gained Along the Way 366

The Path Forward 368

GLOSSARY 371

INDEX 381

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
3 of 3

Loading
LOADING...

4 of 3

Eric Rebentisch leads research projects at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology′s (MIT) Sociotechnical Systems Research Center (SSRC). His research focuses on improving the performance of technically driven organizations and their product offerings.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll