Seashore Paspalum. The Environmental Turfgrass

  • ID: 3781851
  • Book
  • 304 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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A user–friendly operational manual for seashore paspalum, an exciting new grass perfect for use on golf courses, lawns, sports fields, and in sod production! Seashore Paspalum provides an exciting alternative grass of comparable texture and quality to hybrid bermudagrasses that can tolerate effluent, brackish, and seawater blends. Salt–sensitive species can lead to huge management costs, while salt–tolerant seashore paspalum can significantly reduce management efforts saving your time and money––without sacrificing turf quality!
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PART I: SEASHORE PASPALUM BACKGROUND AND DESCRIPTION.

1. Introduction.

2. Nomenclature.

3. Taxonomy.

4. History.

5. Genetics.

PART II: ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS RESISTANCE.

6. Breeding for Multiple Environmental Stresses.

7. Paspalum Abiotic/Edaphic Stress Resistance.

8. Paspalum Biotic Stress Resistance.

PART III: MANAGEMENT PRACTICES.

9. Management of Abiotic/Edaphic Stresses.

10. Management of Biotic Stresses.

11. Golf Course Case Studies.

12. Sports Fields.

13. Lawn and Landscape Use.

14. Sod and Sprig Production.

PART IV: BASIC PRINCIPLES WHEN USING ALTERNATIVE WATER RESOURCES/PROBLEM SITES.

15. Influence of Irrigation Water Quality on Turfgrass Fertilization.

16. Seawater Irrigation: Turfgrass Management for the Ultimate Water Quality Problem.

17. Fertilization of Excessively Acid (pH 5.0) Soils.

18. Environmentally Sensitive Sites: Turfgrass Fertilization Consideration.

19. Bioremediation and Reclamation.

References.

Index.
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Dr. Robert N. Carrow is Professor of Turfgrass Stress Physiology and Soil Stresses, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, University of Georgia, Griffin. Research emphasis is on turfgrass as affected by environmental, traffic (wear and soil compaction), and edaphic (soil chemical and physical) stresses. (E–mail: rcarrow@gaes.griffin.peachnet.edu)

Dr. Ron R. Duncan is Professor of Turfgrass Breeding (Paspalum, Tall Fescue) and Stress Physiology, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, University of Georgia, Griffin. Research emphasis on developing turfgrasses with enhanced tolerance to abiotic, edaphic, and biotic stresses, improved compatibility with the environment, and minimal requirements for maintenance. (E–mail: rduncan@gaes.griffin.peachnet.edu)
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