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Dealing With Difficult Customers - Webinar

  • ID: 3989413
  • Webinar
  • 90 Minutes
  • Lorman Business Center, Inc.
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Learn effective strategies and best practices in selling to difficult customers.

If you’re in sales and customer service, you know all too well the feeling of being thrown off your game by a difficult or demanding customer. You get frustrated because you can’t find the right words, and to make matters worse, about 5 minutes after both the customer and the possibility of a sale have gone forever-you think, ‘WHY DIDN’T I SAY THAT?’.

In this material, you’ll learn specific strategies you can use immediately upon returning to work to confidently and effectively find the right words when dealing with demanding-or even angry-customers, make the sale, and transform those difficult customers into raving fans.

You’ll get step-by-step language patterns, power phrases, danger phrases, free-style scripts, and other tactics to help you effectively respond to difficult customers and keep your cool while making the sale and letting your communication skills shine. This information is critical for customer service and sales representatives who deal with difficult customers, either on the phone or in person, as well as managers and supervisors who deal with customers who have asked to speak to a supervisor.
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Overcoming Objections From Difficult and/or Demanding Customers
- Determine Whether the Objection You're Facing Is a Real Objection or a False One, Using 'Blacklight Questions'
- Overcome 'Real' Objections Using Either the Tactical 'Solution-Focused Question' for Sales, or the Strategic 3-Step 'Porcupine' Tactic
- Effectively Reassure Customers That Their Objections Were Heard and Addressed by Using the Two-Step 'Key-Word Recognition and Feedback' Active Listening Technique

Saving the Sale: Dealing With Angry Customers
- How to Avoid Some of the Most Common 'Danger Phrases' People Unwittingly Say to Angry Customers That Inevitably Make Matters Worse, and How to Use Strategic 'Power Phrases' Instead That Have Been Proven to Defuse the Situation and Save the Sale
- How to Apologize to a Customer in a Way That Increases the Odds of Transforming the Customer and Saving the Sale Using the '3-Step Tactical Apology'
- How to Stop a Train-Wreck and Get the Sale Back on Track Using Powerful 'Navigational Phrases' and Other Verbal Tactics
- How to Say 'No' to a Customer Using the Advanced Three-Step 'Diplomatic Decline' Helping You Not Only Save a Potential Sale, but Boost Your Credibility and Build Customer Trust as Well

Advanced Persuasion Techniques
- How to Get Through to Difficult Customers You Can't Seem to Connect With by 'Style-Stepping,' Which Involves Using Tactical Verbal Patterns Designed to More Precisely and Specifically Speak to Each Individual Customer's Unique Needs and Style
- Which Hemisphere of the Brain Is Responsible for Which Part of the Decision-Making Process, and How to Persuade Customers More Effectively by Knowing When and How to Use Both R-Directed (Right-Brain Directed) Language Patterns and L-Directed (Left-Brain Directed) Language Patterns
- How to Use Simple 'Power Phrases' to Disagree With a Customer and Stand Your Ground When Challenged Without Sounding Argumentative or Disagreeable, and What the 'Danger Phrases' Are You'll Want to Avoid Using That Most Commonly Sabotage Communication Success in These Situations
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Daniel O'Connor, Power Diversity, LLC.
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This webinar is designed for sales managers, directors, account managers, presidents, vice presidents, account executives, analysts, consultants and other sales professionals.
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