American Incomes: Demographics of Who Has Money, 11th Edition

  • ID: 4090194
  • Book
  • Region: United States
  • 448 Pages
  • New Strategist Publications, Inc
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The 11th edition of American Incomes: Demographics of Who Has Money is your map to the changing consumer landscape, exploring and explaining the economic status of Americans in the aftermath of the Great Recession. It looks at household income trends through 2014 by age, household type, race and Hispanic origin, education, region, and work status; examines trends in the incomes of men and women by a variety of demographic characteristics; and provides data on the wealth of American households, showing the impact of the Great Recession on household assets and debt. The poverty population is also a focus of American Incomes.

The five chapters in American Incomes are:

  1. Household Income
    Chapter 1 examines trends in household income over the past 14 years. It also presents current household income statistics by age of householder, race and Hispanic origin of householder, type of household, and other important demographic characteristics.
  2. Men’s Income Trends
    Chapter 1 examines trends in household income over the past 14 years. It also presents current household income statistics by age of householder, race and Hispanic origin of householder, type of household, and other important demographic characteristics.
  3. Women’s Income
    Chapter 3 examines trends and the current status of women’s income, which has become increasingly important to family economic well-being.
  4. Wealth
    The statistics shown in Chapter 4, from the Federal Reserve Board’s Survey of Consumer Finances, provide a comprehensive portrait of the assets, debts, and net worth of American households by a variety of demographic characteristics. This chapter also examines the 2007-to-2013 trends in wealth.
  5. Poverty
    This chapter shows how poverty has grown and reveals the demographic characteristics of those who are falling behind.

You can gain more insight into the economic well-being of Americans by thumbing (or scrolling) through the pages of American Incomes than you could by spending all afternoon surfing databases on the Internet. By having it on your bookshelf or computer desktop, you can get the answers to your questions even faster than you can online.

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Chapter 1.  Household Income 

  • Household Income Trends.
  • Richest 20 Percent of Households Control Most Household Income.
  • Many Households Have Incomes of $100,000 or More
  • Median Household Income Has Not Recovered from the Great Recession
  • Every Household Type Has Lost Ground
  • Every Racial and Ethnic Group Has Lost Ground
  • Even College Graduates Are Losing Ground
  • Incomes Fell in Households Large and Small
  • Regardless of the Number of Earners, Median Household Income Has Stagnated
  • Families Have Been Losing Ground
  • Working Wives Are Still Keeping Families Afloat
  • Median Household Income Has Declined in Every Region
  • State Gainers and Losers
  • Household Income, 2014
  • Dual-Earner Couples Dominate the Affluent
  • Married Couples Have the Highest Incomes
  • Household Income Peaks in the 35-to-54 Age Group
  • Among Couples, the Middle Aged Have the Highest Incomes
  • Incomes of Female-Headed Families Are below Average
  • Male-Headed Families Have Average Incomes
  • Women Who Live Alone Have the Lowest Incomes
  • Incomes Are Low for Men Who Live Alone
  • Two-Earner Households Have Above-Average Incomes
  • Married Couples with School-Aged Children Have the Highest Incomes
  • Dual Earners Are the Majority of Married Couples
  • Female-Headed Families without Children Have Higher Incomes
  • Male-Headed Families with Children Have Below-Average Incomes
  • Household Income Rises with Education
  • Household Incomes Are Highest in New England
  • Among Blacks, Household Incomes Are Highest in the Northeast
  • Suburban Households Have the Highest Incomes

Chapter 2.  Men’s Income 

  • Men’s Income Trends.
  • Incomes Have Plummeted among Men under Age 65
  • Regardless of Race or Hispanic Origin, Men Have Lost Ground
  • In Every Region, Men Have Lost Ground
  • Men’s Earnings Fell between 2000 and 2014
  • Even College Graduates Have Lost Ground
  • Men’s Income, 2014
  • Income Peaks among Men Aged 45 to 54
  • Men in the South Have the Lowest Incomes
  • Men in the Suburbs Have the Highest Incomes
  • Most Men Have Modest Earnings
  • Men’s Earnings Rise with Education
  • Education Boosts Earnings of Asian, Black, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Men
  • Men’s Earnings Vary Widely by Occupation
  • Most Men Receive Wage or Salary Income

Chapter 3.  Women’s Income

  • Women’s Income Trends
  • Women’s Median Income Has Stopped Growing .
  • Regardless of Race or Hispanic Origin, Women Lost Ground between 2007 and 2014
  • Women in Every Region Have Lost Ground since the Great Recession
  • Among Women Who Work Full-Time, Earnings Have Been Stable since 2007
  • Education Does Not Guarantee Earnings Growth
  • Women’s Earnings Have Been Stable since 2007
  • Nine Million Wives Earn More than Their Husbands
  • Women’s Income, 2014
  • Women’s Income Barely Peaks in Middle Age
  • Among Women Who Work Full-Time, Incomes Are Highest in the Northeast
  • Women in Nonmetropolitan Areas Have Lower Incomes
  • Women Earn Little from Part-Time Work
  • Women with Professional Degrees Earn the Most
  • Education Boosts Earnings in Every Race and Hispanic Origin Group
  • Among Women, Lawyers Earn the Most
  • Nearly Two-Thirds of Women Receive Wage or Salary Income

Chapter 4.  Wealth 

  • Net Worth Continues to Decline.
  • Financial Asset Values Fell between 2010 and 2013
  • Non Financial Assets Are the Foundation of Household Wealth.
  • Most Households Are in Debt

Chapter 5.  Poverty 

  • Poverty Trends
  • Women Head More than Half of the Nation’s Poor Families
  • Family Poverty Has Increased
  • Among Families with Children, Poverty Rate Has Grown.
  • Poverty Rate Has Increased since 2007
  • A Growing Share of the Poor Are Aged 18 to 64
  • Non-Hispanic Whites Are a Minority of the Poor
  • Poverty Has Grown in Every Region
  • Naturalized Citizens Have the Lowest Poverty Rate
  • Poverty Rate Has Increased in Most States since 2007
  • A Growing Share of the Poor Lives in the Suburbs
  • Many of the Poor Have Jobs
  • Poverty, 2014
  • Few Households with Two Earners Are Poor
  • Poverty Rate Is Highest among Families in the South
  • Poverty Rate Is Highest in Central Cities
  • Non-Hispanic Whites Dominate the Elderly Poor
  • Poverty Rate Is Highest among Children
  • Poverty Rate Varies by Family Status and Age
  • Few College Graduates Are Poor
  • Many Young-Adult Workers Are Poor
  • Many of the Nonworking Poor are Ill or Disabled
  • Poverty Is Highest in the South
  • Poverty Is Relatively High in Nonmetropolitan Areas .
  • More than One-Third of Nation’s Poor Live in Four States
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography

Index 

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American Incomes does an admirable job of interpreting what the census data demonstrate in terms that are easily understandable to the average researcher, while also attending to the needs of business researchers and public policymakers who will find this easily accessible source of demographic information invaluable. . . this reference work will be of great use to those in search of a quick and easy alternative to the drudgery and confusion inherent in combing through reams of census data.- American Reference Books Annual

“Recommended for all types of libraries.” - CHOICE

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