+353-1-416-8900REST OF WORLD
+44-20-3973-8888REST OF WORLD
1-917-300-0470EAST COAST U.S
1-800-526-8630U.S. (TOLL FREE)

PRINTER FRIENDLY

Dealing with the Weingarten Ruling (Interviewing Public Sector and Private Sector Union Employees) + legal perspective - Webinar

  • ID: 4278134
  • Webinar
  • 90 Minutes
  • Online Compliance Panel
1 of 3
This training program will explore the rationale behind the Weingarten Decision and other similar court decisions. It will also examine the union employee's responsibilities when subject to an investigative interview and the union representative's role in an investigative interview, along with sanctions and remedies for violation of Weingarten Rights.

Objectives of the Presentation:

- The Weingarten Decision and its rationale
- Other court decisions
- Management's obligation when conducting investigative interviews of union employees
- How to effectively conduct an investigative interview when Weingarten Rights have been asserted
- The union employee's responsibilities when subject to an investigative interview
- The union representative's role in an investigative interview
- Sanctions and remedies for violation of Weingarten Right

Why Should you Attend?

If you are a management employee in an organization, whether public sector or private sector, that employs union workers, it is imperative that you are aware of and understand the ramifications of the Weingarten ruling. If you conduct any type of investigation that could lead to discipline of a union worker, either as a human resource professional, attorney, investigator, auditor, claims representative, or other position, you need to understand Weingarten.

In addition, by attending this webinar, attendees will learn how to conduct effective interviews of union employees that achieve an interview objective of obtaining truthful information. You will learn effective techniques to gain the cooperation of the interviewee.

Topic Background

In 2015, the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 14.8 million workers were members of a union. This represented around 11.1 percent of all workers. Public sector workers had a union membership rate of around 35.2 percent, representing 7.2 million workers. Private sector union membership was at around 6.7 percent, representing 7.6 million workers. Even though it has dwindled over the years, union membership is still a force to be aware of when conducting internal investigations.

In 1935 Congress enacted the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to protect the rights of employees and employers. The NLRA created the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) as an independent federal agency vested with the power to safeguard employees' rights to organize and to determine whether to have unions as their bargaining representative (National Labor Relations Act). The federal equivalent to the NLRB is the Federal Labor Relations Authority (FLRA), created by the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978.

In 1975 the United States Supreme Court in the case of NLRB v. J. Weingarten, Inc. 420 U.S. 251 (1975) upheld a NLRB decision that employees have a right to union representation at investigatory interviews. These rights have become known as the Weingarten Rights. There are processes that management, including management hired investigators must be aware of and follow when conducting investigative interviews of union employees.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 3

Loading
LOADING...

3 of 3
  • John E Grimes John E Grimes,


Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
4 of 3
  • Managers
  • Investigators
  • Auditors
  • Claims Professionals
  • Loss Prevention Professionals
  • Fraud Examiners
  • Attorneys
  • Labor Relations Professionals
  • Human Resource Professionals
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll