Insect Pheromones 2017

  • ID: 4330569
  • Report
  • Region: Global
  • 187 pages
  • Agrow
1 of 5

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • A.G. Biosystems
  • BASF
  • Biobest Group
  • Isagro
  • Laboratorios Agrochem
  • PHEROBANK
  • MORE
The significant increase in world population demands more food production and, consequently, key inputs such as fertilisers and pesticides, particularly in developing countries.

Environmentally-sustainable technologies for pest management means greater semiochemical use, which currently shows a compound annual growth rate higher than 15%.

This report cogently explains how increased semiochemical use is being driven by more restrictive regulatory legislation for conventional pesticides, by consumer demand, and as a result of a meaningful increase in pesticide resistance.

The sector is limited by political (reduction in government funding), societal (cost and lack of understanding), and regulatory factors. However, on a positive note, governments are encouraging more sustainable agricultural policies including less complicated and faster regulatory procedures.

Consumers want to eat residue-free foods and are resistant to conventional insecticides. They are also eating more organic foods and believe in sustainable agriculture.

Technological trends include improvements in pheromone manufacture resulting in lower costs.

With the creation of a substantial biopesticide industry, and the investment of large crop protection companies, the pheromone market will likely see consolidation and mergers in the near future.

Key features include:
  • The regulatory and political factors influencing the market
  • Consumer behaviour and its effect on the industry
  • Market shares and values
  • Trends and technological advances shaping the market
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 5

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • A.G. Biosystems
  • BASF
  • Biobest Group
  • Isagro
  • Laboratorios Agrochem
  • PHEROBANK
  • MORE
Executive summary

1. Introduction

2. Insect pest management
2.1 Summary - Insect pest management
2.2 Introduction
2.3 How IPM works
2.3.1 Prevention
2.3.2 Monitoring
2.3.3 Intervention
2.4 IPM strategies and tools
2.4.1 Establishing an economic threshold
2.4.2 Protecting natural enemies
2.4.3 Product selection
2.4.4 Responsible product use
2.4.5 Managing pest resistance
2.4.6 Pros and cons of IPM tools
2.4.7 Stewardship and training
2.5 Benefits of IPM
2.6 Advantages and disadvantages of pheromones compared to insecticides

3. Semiochemicals
3.1 Summary - Semiochemicals
3.2 Introduction
3.3. Classification of semiochemicals
3.4 Pherobase
3.5 Insect taste and smell
3.5.1 Taste
3.5.2 Smell
3.6 Insect pheromones
3.6.1 Alarm or dispersal pheromones
3.6.2 Trail pheromones
3.6.3 Honey bee pheromones
3.6.4 Sex Attractants
3.6.5 Aggregation and anti-aggregation pheromones
3.6.6 Marking pheromones
3.6.7 Stigmergy
3.6.8 Chemical characteristics of lepidoptera pheromones

4. Pheromone discovery
4.1 Summary - Phermone discovery
4.2 Introduction
4.3 First steps
4.4 Solving problems
4.5 New technology
4.6 A chemical language
4.7 Mating disruption
4.8 Trapping
4.9 Future research

5. Pheromones in IPM - Monitoring
5.1 Summary - Pheromones in IPM - Monitoring
5.2 Introduction
5.3 Modes of use in monitoring and detection
5.4 Types of lures
5.5 Pest monitoring with pheromone traps
5.5.1 Costan Rican army worm
5.5.2 Emerald ash borer
5.5.3 Citrus fruit borer
5.5.4 Tomato leaf miner
5.5.5 Brazilian apple leafroller
5.5.6 Pink bollworm
5.5.7 European corn borer
5.5.8 Stored product pests

6. Pheromones in IPM - Mass trapping
6.1 Summary - Pheromones in IPM - Mass trapping
6.2 Introduction
6.3 Case studies of mass trapping
6.3.1 Tephritid fruit flies
6.3.2 Asiatic rice borer
6.3.3 Tomato leafminer
6.3.3.1 Recommendations for mass trapping
6.3.4 Cotton boll weevil
6.3.5 Bark beetles
6.3.6 Palm weevils
6.3.7 Sweet potato weevil
6.3.8 Black banana weevil

7. Pheromones in IPM - Mating disruption
7.1 Summary - Pheromones in IPM - Mating disruption
7.2 Introduction
7.3 Factors affecting the mating disruption technique
7.3.1 Pheromone dispensers
7.3.2 Pheromone field concentration
7.3.3 Application aspects
7.3.4 Some conclusions for mating disruption
7.4 Case studies of mating disruption
7.4.1 Codling moths
7.4.2 Tomato pinworm
7.4.3 Brazilian leaf apple roller
7.4.4 Pink bollworm
7.4.5 Oriental fruit moth
7.5 Attract and Kill

8. The regulatory situation
8.1 Summary - The regulatory situation
8.2 Introduction
8.3 New Zealand
8.4 Europe
8.5 USA

9. The insect pheromone market and future tendencies
9.1 Summary - The insect pheromone market and future growth trends
9.2 The insect pheromone market
9.3 Future tendencies
9.3.1 Limiting factors and threats
9.4.1 Promotional factors and trends

10. Company profiles and product lines
10.1 Summary
10.2 A.G. Biosystems
10.2.1 Product profile
10.2.2 R&D
10.3 Agrisense, UK
10.3.1 Product portfolio
10.4 Andermatt Biocontrol
10.4.1 Product portfolio
10.5 ATGC Biotech
10.5.1 Product portfolio
10.6 BASF
10.6.1 BASF launches pheromone in Latin America
10.7 Bedoukian Research
10.8 Biagro
10.9 Biobest Group
10.9.1 Product lines
10.10 BioChemTech
10.11 BIO CONTROLE
10.11.1 Product line
10.12 Central Plantation Crops Research Institute (CPCRI)
10.13 ChemTica International (CTI)
10.14 Hercon Environmental
10.14.1 Product portfolio
10.14.2 New capability to control bark beetles
10.15 Horizon Biosciences
10.16 International Pheromone Systems (IPS)
10.17 International Biocontrol Manufacturers Association (IBMA)
10.18 Isagro
10.18.1 Ecodian range of pheromones
10.19 ISCA Tecnologias, Brazil
10.20 ISCA Technologies Inc., USA
10.21 Kenogard
10.21.1 Pheromone products
10.22 KOPPERT
10.23 Laboratorios Agrochem
10.24 NOVAGRICA
10.25 OpenNatur
10.26 Pacific Biocontrol Corporation (PBC)
10.26.1 Product portfolio
10.27 PCI (Pest Control India)
10.28 PHEROBANK
10.28.1 Product portfolio
10.29 RUSSELL IPM
10.30 Scentry Biologicals
10.30.1 Product portfolio
10.31 SEDQ
10.32 SHIN-ETSU
10.33 SUTERRA
10.33.1 Product portfolio
10.34 Trécé Incorporated
10.35 TRIFOLIO
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
3 of 5

Loading
LOADING...

4 of 5
  • A.G. Biosystems
  • ATGC Biotech
  • Agrisense, UK
  • Andermatt Biocontrol
  • BASF
  • BIO CONTROLE
  • Bedoukian Research
  • Biagro
  • BioChemTech
  • Biobest Group
  • Central Plantation Crops Research Institute (CPCRI)
  • ChemTica International (CTI)
  • Hercon Environmental
  • Horizon Biosciences
  • ISCA Technologies Inc., USA
  • ISCA Tecnologias, Brazil
  • International Biocontrol Manufacturers Association (IBMA)
  • International Pheromone Systems (IPS)
  • Isagro
  • KOPPERT
  • Kenogard
  • Laboratorios Agrochem
  • NOVAGRICA
  • OpenNatur
  • PCI (Pest Control India)
  • PHEROBANK
  • Pacific Biocontrol Corporation (PBC)
  • RUSSELL IPM
  • SEDQ
  • SHIN-ETSU
  • SUTERRA
  • Scentry Biologicals
  • TRIFOLIO
  • Trécé Incorporated
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
5 of 5
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll