New York Motion Practice Handbook and Forms 2018

  • ID: 4367919
  • Book
  • Region: United States
  • 1020 Pages
  • ALM Media, LLC
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New York Motion Practice Handbook & Forms identifies the statutory provisions governing various types of motions and the key decisions that interpret them. The book addresses some topics that do not generally receive discussion in a CPLR treatise, such as the main substantive provisions of the Statute of Frauds, common law tolling  doctrines, and grounds to disqualify counsel or for recusal of a judge. The book includes discussions of: Motion to Dismiss, Disclosure Motions, Provisional Remedies,  Motions Concerning Parties, Miscellaneous Pretrial Motions, Summary Dispositions, Trial Motions, and Motions to the Appellate Courts. Cohen not only describes the mechanics of making the motions, but the legal grounds underpinning them as well.

Included are 80+ forms and sample documents on CD.  

This new edition contains a new chapter on special proceedings.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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CHAPTER 1                         Introduction to Motion Practice
1-1          WHAT IS A MOTION?
1-2          SOURCES OF RULES THAT GOVERN NEW YORK MOTION PRACTICE
1-2:1      CPLR
1-2:2      Uniform Rules
1-2:3      Rules of the Commercial Division
1-2:4      Rules of Individual Courts
1:2-5      Judges’ Rules
1-3          TYPES OF MOTIONS
1-3:1      Motions Made by Notice of Motion
1-3:2      Motions by Order to Show Cause
1-3:3      Ex Parte Motions
1-3:4      Oral Motions
1-4          WHERE ARE MOTIONS MADE?
1-4:1      Motions Made by Notice of Motion
1-4:2      Motions to Change Venue
1-4:3      Motions Made by Order to Show Cause
1-4:4      Ex parte Motions
1-4:5      Motions in County Court
1-5          PRIOR JUDICIAL REVIEWAND PRE-MOTION CONFERENCES
1-6          MOTIONS GRANTED ONDEFAULT
1-7          WITHDRAWING A MOTION
1-8          FORM OF MOTION PAPERS
1-9          PAGE LIMITS
1-10       DECISIONS, ORDERS AND APPEALABLE PAPER
 
CHAPTER 2                          How to Make a Motion
2-1          CHOOSING A RETURNDATE
2-1:1      Return Date Must Be a Proper Motion Date
2-1:2      Return Date Must Give Other Parties Sufficient Time to Respond
2-1:3      Additional Time for Service by Overnight or Regular Mail
2-1:4      Adjournments
2-2          COMPUTING THE DATEFOR ANSWERS AND REPLIES
2-2:1      Time for Serving Opposition and Reply Papers
2-2:2      Additional Time Based on Method of Service
2-2:3      Weekends and Holidays
2-2:4      Papers Served Out of Time
2-3          THE PAPERS THAT CONSTITUTE A MOTION
2-3:1      Notice of Motion
2-3:2      Affidavits and Affirmations
2-3:2.1  Affidavits from Out-of-State or Foreign Witnesses
2-3:2.2  Foreign Language Affidavits
2-3:2.3  Affirmations
2-3:3      Briefs
2-3:4      Request for Judicial Intervention in Initial Motion
2-3:5      Request for Oral Argument
2-4          CROSS-MOTIONS
2-4:1      Advantages and Disadvantages of Cross-Motions
2-4:2      How to Make a Cross-Motion
2-4:3      Time to Serve Cross-Motion
2-5          REPLY PAPERS
2-5:1      New Arguments Cannot Be Made for First Time on Reply
2-5:2      No Sur-Replies Without Leave of Court
2-6          SERVICE OF PAPERS
2-6:1      Methods of Service
2:6-2      Proof of Service
2-6:3      Importance of Proper Service
2-7          FILING OF PAPERS
2-7:1      Electronic Filing
2-8          EX PARTE MOTIONS AND ORDERS TO SHOW CAUSE
2-8:1      When to Proceed by Order to Show Cause
2-8:2      Required Statement Regarding Prior Applications
2-8:3      Required Statement for Temporary Injunctive Relief
2-8:4      Local Procedures for ExParte Motions and Orders to Show Cause
 
CHAPTER 3                          Motion to Dismiss
3-1          PROCEDURE FOR MOTION TO DISMISS
3-1:1      When a Motion to Dismiss May Be Made
3-1:1.1  Motion to Dismiss in Lieu of Responsive Pleading
3-1:1.2  Post-Answer Motion to Dismiss Based on Lack of Service
3-1:1.3  Motions to Dismiss After Service of Responsive Pleading
3-1:2      The Single Motion Rule and Its Exceptions
3-1:3      Waiver of Objections
3-1:3.1  Waiver of Non-Jurisdictional Defenses
3-1:3.2  Waiver of Jurisdictional Defenses
3-1:3.3  Effect of Amended Pleading on Pending Motion
3-1:4      Automatic Stay of Disclosure
3-1:5      Continuance of Motion Pending Additional Disclosure
3-1:6      Immediate Trial or Inquest
3-2          DEFENSE FOUNDED ONDOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE
3-3          LACK OF SUBJECTMATTER JURISDICTION
3-3:1      Objection Is Non-Waivable and Can Be Raised at Any Time
3-3:2      Dismissal of Claim Brought in Wrong Court
3-3:3      Suits Against Foreign Corporations
3-3:4      Justiciability and Standing
3-3:5      Other Grounds for Dismissal
3-4          LACK OF CAPACITY TO SUE
3-5          ANOTHER PENDING ACTION
3-5:1      Difference in Parties or Relief Sought
3-5:2      First-in-Time Rule and Exceptions
3-6          ARBITRATION AND AWARD
3-7          Collateral Estoppel
3-8          RES JUDICATA
3-8:1      Proceedings Giving Rise to Res Judicata
3-8:2      Effect of Failure to Assert Counterclaim in Prior Proceeding
3-9          DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY
3-10       INFACY OR DISABILITY OF MOVING PARTY
3-11       PAYMENT OR RELEASE
3-12       STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS
3-12:1    Essence of the Claim Controls the Statute of Limitations
3-12:2    Borrowing Statute
3-12:3    Accrual
3-12:3.1 Fraud Discovery Rule
3-12:3.2                Foreign Body Discovery Rule
3-12:4    Tolling
3-12:4.1                General Considerations
3-12:4.2                Tolling of Professional Malpractice Claims
3-12:4.3                FiduciaryToll
3-12:4.4                Stay of Commencement by Court or Statutory Prohibition
3-12:4.5                Arbitration
3-12:4.6                Dismissal of Prior Action
3-12:4.7                Equitable Tolling
3-12:4.8                Undue Influence and Duress
3-12:4.9                Other Statutory Tolls
3-12:4.10              Tolling Agreements
3-13       STATUTE OF FRAUDS
3-13:1    Types of Agreements That Are Subject to Statute of Frauds
3-13:2    Requirement That Performance Within One Year Is Not Possible
3-13:3    Unsigned Documents and Multiple Writings
3-13:4    Electronic Signatures and Emails
3-13:5    Part Performance
3-13:6    Promissory Estoppel     
3-14       IMPROPER IMPOSITION OFA COUNTERCLAIM
3-15       FAILURE TO STATE A CAUSE OF ACTION
3-16       INSUFFICIENCY OFPROCESS
3-16:1    Time to Assert Objection to Service of Process
3-16:2    The 120-Day Period toServe Process
3-16:3    Proof of Service
3-16:3.1                The Contents of the Proof of Service
3-16:3.2                When Proof of Service Must Be Filed
3-16:4    Procedure for Contesting Service of Process
3-17       LACK OF PERSONALJURISDICTION
3-17:1    Presence Within the State
3-17:1.1                In-State Service and Transient Jurisdiction
3-17:1.2                Domicile Within the State
3-17:1.3                Corporation Doing Business Within the State
3-17:2    Contractual Consent to Jurisdiction
3-17:3    Long-Arm Jurisdiction
3-17:3.1                Statute Has Narrower Reach than Constitutional Due Process
3-17:3.2                Long-Arm Jurisdiction Over Executors and Administrators
3-17:3.3                Transacting Business or Making Contract in Forum
3-17:3.4                Defamation
3-17:3.5                Extraterritorial Act Causing Injury Within the State
3-17:3.6                Jurisdiction Arising from Internet Activity
3-17:3.7                Corporate Officers and Directors
3-17:3.8                Declaratory Relief Concerning Foreign Libel Judgments
3-17:4    Constitutional Due Process
3-17:4.1                Minimum Contacts
3-17:4.2                Fair Play
3-17:4.3                ProductsLiability and Stream of Commerce
3:17-5    Effect of Counterclaim on Personal Jurisdiction Defense
3:17-6    Participation in Discovery Proceedings and Conferences
3:17-7    Standards Governing Pre-Answer Motion to Dismiss
3-18       LACK OF IN REMJURISDICTION
3-18:1    Marital Proceedings
3-18:2    In Rem Jurisdiction Over Real and Personal Property
3-18:3    Quasi In RemJ urisdiction
3-19       FAILURE TO JOIN A NECESSARY PARTY
3-20       QUALIFIED STATUTORY IMMUNITY
3-21       MOTION TO DISMISS DEFENSE
3-22       LACK OF PARTICULARITY
3-22:1    Libel or Slander
3-22:2    Fraud, Mistake, Willful Default, Breach of Trust, Undue Influence
3-22:3 Separation or Divorce
3-22:4    Satisfaction of Judgment in Suit Against Judgment Debtor or Co-Obligor
3-22:5    Law of a Foreign Country
3-22:6 Sale and Delivery of Goods or Performance of Labor or Services
3-22:7    Serious Injury in Automobile Accidents
3-22:8    Culpable Conduct by Officer, Director or Trustee of Non-Profit Corporation
3-23       INCONVENIENT FORUM
3-23:1    Forum Selection Clauses
3-23:2    Relevant Factors in the Absence of Forum Selection Clause
3-23:3 Non-Dismissability of Disputes Governed by GOL 5-1402
 
CHAPTER 4                          Disclosure Motions
4-1          SCOPE OF DISCOVERY
4-1:1      Broad Standard of Relevance
4-1:2      Third-Party Discovery
4-1:3      Authorizations
4-1:4      Electronic Discovery
4-1:4.1  Duty to Preserve ESI
4-1:4.2  Allocation of Costs ofProduction
4-1:5      Duty to Supplement
4-1:6      Pre-Action Disclosure
4-2          PRIVILEGED MATTER
4-2:1      Immunity of Privileged Matter from Disclosure
4-2:2      Scope of Attorney-Client Privilege
4-2:3      Common Interest Privilege
4-2:4      Effect of Disclosure to Third Party
4-2:5      Employee’s Use of Company Email
4-2:6      At-Issue Waiver
4-2:7      Waiver During Litigation
4-3          ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT
4-3:1      Underlying Factual Material Not Protected
4-3:2      Waiver
4-4          TRIAL PREPARATION MATERIALS
4-4:1      Materials Prepared Before Litigation Commences
4-4:2      Materials Prepared Without Attorney Supervision
4-4:3      Witness Statements
4-4:4      Expert and Consultant Reports
4-4:5      Company Accident Reports
4-4:6      Reports Made by or for Insurers
4-4:7      Showing Needed to Obtain Disclosure
4-4:8      Protection Against Disclosure of Mental Impressions
4-4:9      Waiver
4-5          OBJECTIONS TO DOCUMENT REQUESTS AND INTERROGATORIES
4-5:1      General Objections
4-5:2      Requirement of Privilege Log for Withheld Documents
4:5-3      Confidential Settlement Information
4-5:4      Tax Returns
4-5:5      Waiver of Objections
4-6          OBJECTIONS RELATING TO DEPOSITIONS
4-6:1      Objections to Deposition Questions
4-6:2      Objections to Location of Deposition
4-6:3      Limitation on CombinedUse of Interrogatories and Depositions
4-6:4      Waiver of Protectionfor Documents Used to Refresh Recollection
4-7          OBJECTIONS TO REQUEST FOR ADMISSION
4-8          OBJECTIONS RELATING TO REQUESTS FOR EXAMINATION
4-9          OBJECTIONS TO DEMAND FOR BILL OF PARTICULARS
4-9:1      Grounds for Objection
4-9:2      Amendment and Supplementation
4-9:3      Variance Between Bill of Particulars and Proof at Trial
4-9:4      Limitation on Combined Use of Interrogatories and Bills of Particulars
4-10       MOTIONS TO COMPEL DISCLOSURE      
4-10:1    Place Where Motion Is To Be Made
4-10:2    Affirmation of Good Faith
4-10:3    Affidavit Concerning Privilege, Work Product or Trial Preparation
4-11       MOTION FOR PROTECTIVE ORDER
4-11:1    Confidential Materials
4-11:2    Stay of Discovery
4-12       MOTION FOR SANCTIONS
4-12:1    Affirmation of Good Faith
4-12:2    Types of Sanctions Available
4-12:3    Enforcement of Conditional Orders
4-12:4    Sanctions for Failure to Appear at Deposition
4-12:5    Sanctions in Absence of Prior Discovery Order
4-13       PERSONAL INJURY AND WRONGFUL DEATH CASES
4-14       EXPERT DISCLOSURE
4-14:1    Scope of Expert Disclosure
4-14:2    Expert Depositions
4-14:2.1                By Consent
4-14:2.2                By Court Order
4-14:3    Time to Make Expert Disclosure
4-14:4    Expert First Disclosed in Summary Judgment Papers
4-14:5    Expert Testimony Regarding Scientific Evidence
CHAPTER 5                          Provisional Remedies
5-1          GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
5-1:1      Affidavit Concerning Prior Relief
5-1:2      Election of Remedies
5-1:3      Provisional Relief for Counterclaimant or Cross-Claimant
5-2          PREJUDGMENT ATTACHMENT
5-2:1      Grounds of Attachment
5-2:1.1                  Non-Domiciliaries and Foreign Corporations
5-2:1.2  Domiciliary or Resident Who Cannot Be Served Personally
5-2:1.3                  Defendant Who Secretes Assets
5-2:1.4                  Victim of Crime Seeking Restitution From Criminal
5-2:1.5                  Action in Aid of Foreign Judgment
5-2:2      Property Subject to Attachment
5-2:2.1                  Tangible Property
5-2:2.2                  Certificated Stock and Negotiable Instruments
5-2:2.3                  Intangible Interests
5-2:2.4                  Bank Accounts
5-2:3      Motion for Order of Attachment or to Confirm Order
5-2:3.1                  Content of Papers
5-2:3.2                  Statement Concerning Prior Relief Sought or Obtained
5-2:3.3                  Mandatory Undertaking
5-2:3.4                  Filing of Papers
5-2:3.5                  Demand for Papers
5-2:3.6                  Contentof Order of Attachment
5-2:3.7                  Ex Parte Order of Attachment
5-2:3.8                  Pre-Summons Order of Attachment
5-2:3.9                  Ex Parte TRO Pending Attachment
5-2:3.10                Disclosure Concerning Attachment
5-2:3.11                Discharge of Attachment by Defendant
5-2:3.12                Vacatingor Modifying Order of Attachment
5-2:3.13                Annulment of Attachment
5-2:4      Levy by Sheriff
5-2:4.1                  Levy upon Personal Property by Service of Order
5-2:4.2                  Duties of Garnishee
5-2:4.3                  Perfectinga Levy Made by Service of Order
5-2:4.4                  Special Proceeding to Compel Delivery or Payment
5-2:4.5                  Levy upon Personal Property by Seizure
5-2:4.6                  Levy upon Real Property
5-2:4.7                  Priority of Attachment Lien
5-2:4.8                  Sheriff’s Duties After Levy
5-2:4.9                 Return, Release or Inventory of Levied Property
5-2:4.10                Sheriff’s Fees
5-2:5      Proceedings to Determine Adverse Claims
5-2:6      Damages for Wrongful Attachment
5-2:6.1                  Liability to Defendant
5-2:6.2                  Liability to Other Interested Persons
5-2:6.3                  Requirement of an Actual Attachment
5-2:6.4                  DismissalNot on the Merits Supports Damages
5-2:6.5  Liability to Innocent Owners in Case of Joint Representation
5-2:6.6                  Recovery of Legal Expense
5-2:6.7                  Other Damages
5-2:6.8                  Interest
5-2:7      Attachment in Aid of Arbitration
5-2:8      Attachment As Basis for Quasi in Rem Jurisdiction
5-3          TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDERS
5-3:1      Motion for TRO
5-3:1.1                  Ex Parte TRO
5-3:1.2                  Service of TRO
5-3:1.3                  Discretionary Undertaking
5-3:1.4                  Duration of TRO
5-3:2      Vacating or Modifying TRO
5-3:3      Damages Sustained by Reason of TRO
5-3:4      Contempt
5-4          PRELIMINARY INJUNCTIONS
5-4:1      Motion for Preliminary Injunction
5-4:1.1                  Notice Requirement
5-4:1.2                  Mandatory and Prohibitory Injunctions
5-4:1.3                  Required Showing
5-4:1.4                  Irreparable Harm
5-4:1.5                  Statement Concerning Prior Relief Sought or Obtained
5-4:1.6                  Mandatory Undertaking
5-4:1.7                  Hearing
5-4:2      Vacating or Modifying Preliminary Injunction
5-4:3      Damages Caused by Preliminary Injunction
5-4:4      Contempt
5-5          TEMPORARY RECEIVERSHIP
5-5:1      Motion for Appointment of Temporary Receiver
5-5:2      Powers of Temporary Receiver
5-5:3      Receiver’s Fees
5-5:4      Undertaking
5-5:5      Duration of Receivership
5-5:6      Extension of Receivership
5-5:7      Receivership Accounts
5-5:8      Removal of Receiver
5-5:9      Liability of Temporary Receiver
5-6          NOTICE OF PENDENCY
5-6:1      Actions in Which Notice of Pendency May Be Filed
5-6:2      Establishing a Notice of Pendency
5-6:2.1                  Filing the Notice of Pendency
5-6:2.2                  Content of Notice
5-6:2.3                  Indexing the Notice
5-6:2.4                  Amendment of Notice
5-6:2.5                  Requirement of Filing a Facially Sufficient Complaint
5-6:3      Effect of Notice
5-6:4      Service of Summons
5-6:5      Duration of Notice of Pendency
5-6:6      Motion to Cancel Notice of Pendency
5-6:6.1                  Standingto Make Motion
5-6:6.2                  Mandatory Cancellation
5-6:6.3                  Discretionary Cancellation
5-6:6.4                  Costs and Expenses
5-6:6.5                  Voluntary Cancellation
5-6:7      Undertaking
5-6:8      Successive Notices of Pendency
 
CHAPTER 6                          Motions Concerning Parties
6-1          JOINDER OF NEW PARTIES
6-1:1      Amended Summons and Complaint
6-1:2      Tolling of Statute of Limitations
6-1:3      Effect of Intervening Legislation
6-2          INTERPLEADER
6-2:1      Nature of Action
6-2:2      Procedure for Commencing Interpleader Action
6-2:3      Multiple Actions or Claims Involving Stakeholder
6-2:4      Discharge of Stakeholder
6-2:4.1                  Procedure for Discharge
6-2:4.2                  Grounds to Deny Interpleader Relief
6-2:4.3                  Stakeholder’s Fees and Expenses
6-2:4.4                  Interest to Claimant
6-2:5      Deposit Into Court as Basis of Jurisdiction
6-3          IMPLEADER
6-3:1      Grounds for Impleader
6-3:1.1                  Subrogation Claims
6-3:1.2                  Impleader Unavailable in Court of Claims
6-3:1.3                  Third-Party Claim May Exceed Plaintiff’s Demand
6-3:2      Procedure for Joining Third Party
6-3:3      Answer of Third-Party Defendant
6-3:3.1                  Defenses Asserted by Third-Party Defendant
6-3:3.2                  Claims Asserted by Third-Party Defendant
6-3:4      Claim by Plaintiff Against Third-Party Defendant
6-3:5      Dismissal or Separate Trial of Third-Party Complaint
6-4          INTERVENTION
6-4:1      Mandatory Intervention
6-4:1.1                  Right Conferred by Statute
6-4:1.2                  Persons Who May be Bound by Judgment
6-4:1.3                  Action Affecting Property
6-4:1.4                  Constitutional Challenges
6-4:1.5                  Notice to the State Comptroller
6-4:2      Permissive Intervention
6-4:2.1                  Prejudice as Ground for Denial
6-4:2.2                  Restriction on Adding New Issues
6-4:3      Time to Make Motion
6-4:4      Intervention Pleading
6-5          SUBSTITUTION OF PARTIES
6-5:1      Effect of Death of a Party
6-5:2      Motion for Substitution
 
CHAPTER 7                          Miscellaneous Pretrial Motions
7-1          MOTION TO CHANGE VENUE
7-1:1      Rules of Venue
7-1:1.1 Plaintiff’s Initial Choice of Venue
7-1:1.2 Contractual Forum Clauses
7-1:1.3 Venue Based on Residence
7-1:1.4 Municipalities, Public Authorities and Public Officers
7-1:1.5 Real or Personal Property
7-1:1.6 Conflicting Venue Provisions
7-1:2      Motion to Change Venue Based on Improper Venue
7-1:2.1 Time to Make Motion
7-1:2.2 Procedure for Making Motion
7-1:2.3 Where to Make Motion
7-1:3      Other Grounds to Change Venue
7-1:3.1 Inability to Obtain Impartial Trial
7-1:3.2 Convenience of Witnesses and Interests of Justice
7-2          CONSOLIDATION AND SEVERANCE
7-2:1      Grounds for Consolidation or Joint Trial
7-2:2      Distinction Between Consolidation and Joint Trial
7-2:3      Consolidation of Cases Pending in Different Courts
7-2:4      Severance of Claims
7-2:5      Bifurcated Trials
7-3          MOTION TO STAY PROCEEDINGS
7-3:1      Distinguished From Other Grounds for Stay
7-3:2      Stay Distinguished from Injunction
7-3:3      Stay of Related Proceeding
7-3:4      Stay of Trial Pending Appeal
7-3:5      Stay Pending Criminal Proceedings
7-3:6      Stay of Execution
7-3:7      Vacating Stay
7-4          MOTION FOR LEAVE TO REARGUE
7-4:1      Grounds for Motion
7-4:2      Procedural Requirements
7-4:3      Time to Make Motion
7-4:4      Appeal Issues
7-5          MOTION FOR LEAVE TO RENEW
7-5:1      Grounds for Motion
7-5:2      Procedural Requirements
7-5:3      Time to Make Motion
7-5:4      Combined Motion to Reargue and Renew
7-5:5      Appeal Issues
7-6          RESPONSE TO SUMMONS WITH NOTICE
7-7          MOTION FOR LEAVE TO AMEND
7-7:1      Liberal Amendment Rules
7-7:2      Statute of Limitations Issues
7-7:3      Costs and Continuances
7-7:4      Amendment to Conform to the Evidence
7-8          MOTION TO DISQUALIFY COUNSEL
7-8:1      Disqualification of Lawyer-Witness
7-8:1.1 Advocate-Witness Rule
7-8:1.2 Adverse Witness Rule
7-8:2      Current Clients with Conflicting Interests
7-8:3      Former Client
7-8:3.1 Representation Adverse to Former Client
7-8:3.2 Representation Adverse to Client of Former Firm
7-8:3.3 Imputation of Conflict and Screening
7-8:3.4 Representation Adverse to Departing Attorney’s Client
7-9          MOTION TO RECUSE
 
CHAPTER 8                          Summary Dispositions
8-1          SUMMARY JUDGMENT
8-1:1      Time to Make Motion
8-1:2      Time to Make Cross-Motion for Summary Judgment
8-1:3      Burden of Moving Party
8-1:4      Affidavits
8-1:4.1                  Personal Knowledge
8-1:4.2                  Permissible Uses of Attorney Affidavit
8-1:4.3                  Expert Affidavit
8-1:4.4                  Oath and Notarization
8-1:5      Copy of Pleadings
8-1:6      Admissible Evidence
8-1:7      Statement of Undisputed Facts
8-1:8      Burden of Non-Moving Party
8-1:9      Use of Hearsay by Non-Moving Party
8-1:10    Facts Unavailable to Non-Moving Party
8-1:11    Statement of Disputed Facts by Non-Moving Party
8-1:12    Partial Summary Judgment
8-1:13    Immediate Trial or Inquest
8-2          SUMMARY JUDGMENT IN LIEU OF COMPLAINT
8-2:1      Action Upon Instrument for the Payment of Money Only
8-2:2      Action on a Judgment
8-2:2.1                  Judgment of Another State
8-2:2.2                  Foreign Country Judgment
8-2:2.3                  Personal Jurisdiction over Defendant Not Required
8-2:3      Notice
8-2:3.1                  Minimum Notice Required
8-2:3.2                  Service of Opposition in Advance of Motion Date
8-2:3.3                  Consequence of Insufficient Time for Response
8-2:4      Late Service of Opposition
8-2:5      Counterclaim
8-2:6      Conversion to Ordinary If Motion Is Denied
8-2:7      Automatic Stay
8-3          MOTION FOR DEFAULT
8-3:1      Grounds for Default
8-3:1.1                  Failure to Respond to Summons or Pleading
8-3:1.2                  Failure to Appear at Trial or Conference
8-3:2      Proof Required for Default
8-3:2.1                  Proof of Service
8-3:2.2                  Proof of Claim
8-3:2.3                  Motion for Default Based on a Summons with Notice
8-3:2.4                  Affidavit of Additional Mailing
8-3:2.5                  Jurisdiction by Attachment
8-3:2.6                  Affidavit of Nonmilitary Service
8-3:3      Motion to Extend Time to Answer
8-3:4      Clerk’s Judgment for Sum Certain
8-3:5      Inquest on Damages
8-3:6      One-Year Limit to Take Proceedings for Default Judgment
8-3:7      Default Against Less than All Defendants
8-3:8      Notice Requirements
8-3:9      Motion to Vacate Default
8-3:10    Clerk’s Judgment Where Counterclaim Is Interposed
8-4          WANT OF PROSECUTION
8-4:1      Grounds for Dismissal Based Upon Want of Prosecution
8-4:1.1  Requirement that One Year Elapse After Joinder of Issue
8-4:1.2                  Requirement of Proper 90-Day Demand
8-4:1.3                  Other Facial Requirements
8-4:1.4                  Service Requirements
8-4:2      Action by Court, not Clerk, Is Required for Dismissal
8-4:3      Standing to Move for Dismissal
8-4:4      Compliance Within 90 Days of Demand Bars Dismissal
8-4:5      Effect of 90-Day Demand on Defendant’s Right to Discovery
8-4:6      Party Who Cannot Comply Must Move to Vacate Demand or Seek Extension
8-4:7      Showing Required to Avoid Dismissal
8-4:7.1                  Justifiable Excuse for Delay
8-4:7.2                  Meritorious Cause of Action
8-4:8      Post-Note of Issue Delay
8-4:9      Effect of Dismissal on Recommencement of Action
8-4:10    Dismissal Does not Bar Defense of Counterclaim
8-5          VOLUNTARY DISCONTINUANCE
8-5:1      Discontinuance by Notice
8-5:1.1                  Cross-Claim
8-5:1.2                 Summons With Notice
8-5:1.3                  Discontinuance After Motion to Dismiss
8-5:2      Discontinuance by Stipulation
8-5:3      Tax Delinquent Parcel of Land
8-5:4      Class Actions
8-5:5      Discontinuance by Order of Court
8-5:6      Effect of Voluntary Discontinuance
8-5:7      Vacatur of Discontinuance
8-6          CONFESSION OF JUDGMENT
8-6:1      Due Execution of Affidavit
8-6:2      Recitation of Facts Underlying Debt
8-6:3      County in Which Affidavit May Be Filed
8-6:4      Debt to Attorney
8-6:5      Three-Year Period for Entry of Judgment
8-6:5      Attack on Confession of Judgment
8-6:6      Execution Where Judgment Is Not All Due
8-6:7      Joint Debt
8-6:8      Cognovit Judgment of Sister State
8-7          DISMISSAL OF ABANDONED CASE          
8-7:1      Grounds for Dismissal
8-7:2      Application Limited to Cases on Trial Calendar
8-7:3      Restoration to Trial Calendar as of Right
8-7:4      Showing Required After Dismissal
 
CHAPTER 9                          Trial Motions
9-1          MOTION FOR JUDGMENT DURING TRIAL
9-1:1      Legal Standard
9-1:2      Time to Make Motion
9-1:3      Effect on Appellate Review of Failure to Make Motion for Directed Verdict
9-2          DIRECTED VERDICT IN INFORMED CONSENT CASE
9-3          MOTION FOR CONTINUANCE OR MISTRIAL
9-4          REPORT OF REFEREE OR ADVISORY JURY
9-5          POST-TRIAL MOTIONS FOR JUDGMENT AND NEW TRIAL
9-5:1      Time to Make Motion
9-5:2      Single Motion Rule
9-5:3      Judgment Not withstanding the Verdict
9-5:3.1                  Legal Standard
9-5:3.2                  General Verdicts and Multiple Theories of Liability
9-5:4      Verdict Against the Weight of the Evidence
9-5:5      Excessive or Insufficient Damages
9-5:6      New Trial in the Interest of Justice
9-5:7      Inconsistent or Compromise Verdict
9-5:8      Jury Deadlock
 
CHAPTER 10       Motions to the Appellate Courts
10-1       GENERAL MOTION PROCEDURES
10-2       MOTIONS TO ENLARGE TIME TO PERFECT APPEAL
10-2:1    Time to Take or Move for Permission to Appeal
10-2:2    Time to Perfect Appeal
10-2:3    Enlarging Time to Appeal
10-3       MOTION FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL?APPELLATE DIVISION
10-3:1    Requirement of Appealable Paper
10-3:2    Orders Appealable As of Right
10-3:2.1                Appeals From Supreme Court and County Court
10-3:2.2                Appeals From Other Courts
10-3:3    Supreme Court and County Court Orders Appealable by Permission
10-4       Appellate Review of ExParte Orders
10-5       MOTION FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL?COURT OF APPEALS
10-5:1    Appeal As of Right
10-5:2    Appeal by Permission
10-5:2.1                Permission of Either Appellate Division or Court of Appeals
10-5:2.2                Permission of Appellate Division Only
10-5:3    When an Appellate Order Is Deemed Final
10-6       MANDAMUS
10-7       MOTION FOR STAY PENDING APPEAL
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Daniel A. Cohen is counsel to the Kagen Law Firm in New York City. Before joining the Kagen Law Firm, Cohen was a partner at Kornstein Veisz Wexler & Pollard, LLP.  Cohen has extensive litigation experience in the state and federal courts of New York, in both the trial courts and the appellate courts. His practice areas include contract disputes, corporate governance, employment, securities fraud, RICO, insurance coverage, and judgment enforcement.  Cohen is a member of the Board of ALM’s on-line publication, New York Smart Litigator and is a frequent contributor of Ask the Expert columns for that publication. He publishes regularly on matters relating to civil procedure. Cohen is a former chair of the New York County Lawyers Association committee on insurance, where he remains an active member.  Cohen graduated from Princeton University in 1986. He received graduate degrees in philosophy from Oxford University and the University of Michigan before graduating from the University of Michigan Law School in 1994, where he was an Articles Editor of the Law Review. After law school, Cohen clerked for the Hon. J. Edward Lumbard on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals before entering private practice.
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