2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Community Health Partnerships - Product Image

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Community Health Partnerships

  • ID: 4434755
  • Report
  • 50 pages
  • Healthcare Intelligence Network
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95% of 2017 Survey Respondents Participate in Community Health Partnerships

Increasingly, healthcare organizations are forging community partnerships to bridge care gaps and improve population health status. This alignment of care and resources ranges from providing transportation to doctors' appointments to scheduling EMT visits to visit the homebound elderly following their hospitalization. Working in tandem with community groups addresses social determinants of health (SDOH) and produces clinical and financial benefits that are recognized and rewarded by today's value-based healthcare reimbursement models.

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Community Health Partnerships documents the efforts of 81 healthcare organizations to align clinical interventions with neighborhood collaborations to improve health, wellness and socioeconomic factors in the populations they serve. These metrics are compiled from responses to the October 2017 Community Health Partnerships survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

This 50-page report, which compiles hundreds of metrics on community health partnerships by hospitals, health systems, disease management organizations, health plans, behavioral health providers and other respondents, encompasses the following data points:

  • Prevalence of community health partnerships to improve population health;
  • Primary drivers of community health partnerships;
  • Strategies to identify areas for development of community health partnerships;
  • Populations targeted for community health partnerships;
  • Priority program areas for current and desired community health partnerships, including housing, transportation, nutrition and obesity, and behavioral health;
  • Typical community health partners, including schools, service- and faith-based organizations, public health departments and local businesses;
  • Management, storage and access of community resource data;
  • Technologies or processes to link individuals to services provided through these partnerships;
  • Funding for services provided through community health partnerships;
  • Primary responsibility for community health partnerships;
  • Ability of patients and clients to self-refer to community services;
  • Most successful community health partnerships and their impact on population health;
  • Challenges encountered while building community health partnerships;
  • Examples of the ways in which patients or clients have benefited from a particular partnership;
  • Impact of community health partnerships on key metrics, including healthcare quality, social determinants of health, clinical outcomes, hospital readmissions, value-based reimbursement, and total spend;
  • The complete October 2017 Community Health Partnerships survey tool;

and much more.

This benchmark report is designed to meet the business and planning needs of health systems, health plans, population health and health coaching organizations, physician organizations, case management and managed care organizations, and others by providing critical benchmarks in community health partnerships.

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About the Author

Executive Summary
Survey Highlights

Key Findings
Program Components
Results and ROI
Successful Community Health Partnerships

About the Survey
Respondent Demographics
Using This Report

Responses by Sector
The Hospital/Health System Perspective
The Disease Management/Health Coaching Perspective

Respondents in Their Own Words
Most Successful Community Health Partnerships
Storage and Access of Community Services Database
Tools to Link individuals to Partnership-Provided Services
Memorable Impacts from Community Health Partnerships

Conclusion
Responses to Questions

List of Figures
Figure 1: All - Current Community Health Partnerships
Figure 2: All - Future Community Health Partnerships
Figure 3: All - Primary Purpose of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 4: All - Identifying Need for Community Health Partnerships
Figure 5: All - Priority Populations for Community Health Partnerships
Figure 6: All - Current Focus of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 7: All - Desired Focus of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 8: All - Partnering Organizations
Figure 9: All - Funding for Partnership-Provided Services
Figure 10: All - Primary Responsibility for Community Health Partnerships
Figure 11: All - Self-Referral to Partnership Services
Figure 12: All - Greatest Challenge of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 13: All - Impact of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 14: All - Partnership ROI
Figure 15: All - Biggest Barrier to Community Health Partnerships
Figure 16: All - Organization Type
Figure 17: Hospitals - Current Community Health Partnerships
Figure 18: Hospitals - Future Community Health Partnerships
Figure 19: Hospitals - Primary Purpose of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 20: Hospitals - Identifying Need for Community Health Partnerships
Figure 21: Hospitals - Priority Populations for Community Health Partnerships
Figure 22: Hospitals - Current Focus of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 23: Hospitals - Desired Focus of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 24: Hospitals - Partnering Organizations
Figure 25: Hospitals - Funding for Partnership-Provided Services
Figure 26: Hospitals - Primary Responsibility for Community Health Partnerships   
Figure 27: Hospitals - Self-Referral to Partnership Services
Figure 28: Hospitals - Greatest Challenge of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 29: Hospitals - Impact of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 30: Hospitals - Partnership ROI
Figure 31: Hospitals - Biggest Barrier to Community Health Partnership
Figure 32: DM/Coaching - Current Community Health Partnerships
Figure 33: DM/Coaching - Future Community Health Partnerships
Figure 34: DM/Coaching -  Primary Purpose of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 35: DM/Coaching - Identifying Need for Community Health Partnerships 
Figure 36: DM/Coaching - Priority Populations for Community Partnerships
Figure 37: DM/Coaching - Current Focus of Community Health Partnershipss
Figure 38: DM/Coaching - Desired Focus of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 39: DM/Coaching - Partnering Organizations
Figure 40: DM/Coaching - Funding for Partnership-Provided Services
Figure 41: DM/Coaching - Primary Responsibility for Community Partnerships
Figure 42: DM/Coaching - Self-Referral to Partnership Services
Figure 43: DM/Coaching - Greatest Challenge of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 44: DM/Coaching - Impact of Community Health Partnerships
Figure 45: DM/Coaching - Partnership ROI
Figure 46: DM/Coaching - Biggest Barrier to Community Health Partnerships
Appendix A: 2017 Community Health Partnerships Survey Tool

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Motivated to improve population health, healthcare organizations are joining forces with community organizations to bridge care gaps and deliver needed services. The majority of community health partnerships are designed to improve access to healthcare, say 70 percent of respondents to a survey on   Community Health Partnerships by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.   

Eighty-one organizations shared details on community health partnerships, which range from collaborating with a local food bank to educate food pantries on diabetes to teaming up with local government to address unmet social health determinants in the community such as transportation, nutrition or housing.  “Social determinants are more important than ever to managing care. Community health partnerships make a big impact when it comes to rounding out care,” noted one respondent.

Conducting a community health needs assessment (CHNA) is the primary method for identifying potential areas for local health partnerships, say 71 percent of respondents. Priority candidates for 36 percent of these partnerships are high-risk populations, defined as those having two or more chronic medical conditions.

Overall, the survey found that 95 percent of respondents have initiated community health partnerships, with half of remaining organizations preparing to launch partnerships in the coming year. Respondents’ databases of available services are largely electronic, although a few exist in paper or binder format. Apps, call lines and case management software are used to connect individuals to needed services and supports. “We could not survive without community partnerships. Our patients thrive because of them. They are critical to help change the culture of poverty that remains in our community,” concluded a respondent.    

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“So far, the most successful partnerships have been with health systems to - provide community-based programs for older adults and/or pre-chronic and - chronic disease population groups.”
 Hospital/Health System

“Our elder abuse program resulted in increased advocacy among healthcare employees and awareness among clients and the community.”
 Disease Management/Health Coaching

[An example of patient benefit was] utilizing the Federally Qualified Community Health Centers (FQHCs) for residually unfunded patients and utilizing mid-level providers to screen our local homeless population.”
 Hospital/Health System

“[In an example of patient benefit], a woman living with type 2 diabetes for over 50 years never had any guidance on how to manage the disease. Through referrals to other partners and diabetes education, the participant was able to better manage her diabetes and continues to live a healthy lifestyle.”
 Disease Management/Health Coaching

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