2017 Digital Storage for Media and Entertainment Report

  • ID: 4440107
  • Report
  • Region: Global
  • 248 Pages
  • Coughlin Associates
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From 2016 To 2022 Entertainment and Media Digital Storage TAM will Increase by about 2.2X from $3.3B to $7.2B

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Aberdeen
  • CalDigit
  • EVS
  • IEEI TV
  • others
  • Scale Logic
  • MORE

This report is the fifteenth report on data storage and emerging applications and the thirteenth report on data storage in the entertainment and media market.

Data storage is a key element in the digital transformation of content creation, editing, distribution and reception. Data capacity and communication speed increases, changing form factors, lowered product prices and the growing familiarity with digital editing, digital intermediates and various forms of digital distribution are key components in the continued growth and development of entertainment.

Because of the large file sizes required for high resolution and multi-camera images there is increasing demand for high capacity storage devices. The entire content value chain of content creation, editing, archiving, distribution as well as consumer electronics content reception devices, provide an accelerating feedforward mechanism. This drives growth in data storage for all entertainment content applications.

For many archiving and distribution applications where content is relatively static low cost/high capacity SATA HDD storage, optical discs and tape-based storage libraries will predominate. Hard disk drives as well as enterprise SSDs are also used in high performance storage applications where storage cost factors must be combined with performance requirements.

For applications requiring rugged field use or fast playback response flash memory either as cards or solid-state drives (SSDs) are becoming more popular.
 
Due to input form from industry groups, SMPTE, HPA, EBU (and other media and entertainment workers) survey results and discussions with industry end users and equipment providers we have adjusted many of our models for current storage estimates as well as future growth in 2017. We have made modifications to the 2015 assumptions to better model current market conditions, in particular for content acquisition, post production, video on demand and media. This has resulted in significant increases in capacity assumptions, including for content archiving than earlier editions of this report. In addition, we have updated our storage cost estimates.

We list some key points of the report in the following list.

Key Points:

  • Creation, Distribution & Conversion of video content creates a huge demand driver for storage device and systems manufacturers
  • As image resolution increases and as stereoscopic VR video becomes more common, storage requirements explode
  • The development of 4K TV and other high-resolution venues in the home and in mobile devices will drive the demand for digital content (especially enabled by high HEVC (H.265) compression.
  • HDD areal density increases are slower but flash memory growth has increased. This might cause more applications to use flash memory
  • Activity to create capture and display devices for 8K X 4K content is occurring with planned implementation in common media systems by the next decade
  • Active archiving will drive increased use of HDD storage for “archiving” applications, supplementing tape for long term archives
  • Optical storage developments for higher capacity write-once Blu-ray optical cartridges will create higher capacity discs and this may help slow the reduction in optical disc archiving
  • Flash memory dominates cameras and will find wider use in post production and content distribution systems
  • From 2016 to 2022 entertainment and media digital storage TAM (without archiving and preservation) will increase by about 2.2X to from $3.3 B to $7.2 B
  • The growth in storage capacities will result in a total media and entertainment storage revenue growth of about 2.0 X between 2016 and 2022 (from $5.6 B to $11.1 B)
  • Overall annual storage capacity demand for non-archival applications is expected to increase over the period from 2016 to 2022 by 10X from 7.6 EB to 51.1 EB (about 6.7 X)
  • Between 2016 and 2022 media and entertainment storage revenue is expected to grow about 2.0 X between 2016 and 2022 (from $5.6 B to $11.1 B)
  • In 2016 archiving and preservation is estimated to have been 41% of total storage revenue followed by content distribution (29%), postproduction (22%) and content acquisition (8%)
  • In 2022 the projected revenue distribution is 33% content distribution, 35% archiving and preservation, 28% post production and 4% content acquisition
  • Between 2016 and 2022 we expect about a 3.5 X increase in the required digital storage capacity used in the entertainment industry and about a 3.7 X increase in storage capacity shipped per year (from 42,568 PB to 156,739 PB
  • The greatest storage capacity demand in 2016 is for digital conversion and preservation as well as archiving of new content (about 82%). Content acquisition follows at 6.3% with post production at 7.2% and content distribution at 4.3%
  • By 2022 we expect about 71% of archived content to be in near-line and object storage, up from 56% in 2016
  • in 2016 we estimate that 68.2% of the total storage media capacity shipped for all the digital entertainment content segments was in HDDs with digital tape at 23.6%, 5.1% optical discs and flash at 3.1%
  • By 2022 tape has been reduced to 14.7%, HDDs shipped capacity is 79.1%, optical disc capacity is down to about 1.3% and flash capacity percentage is at 4.8%
  • Media revenue is expected to increase about 1.8 X from 2016 to 2022 ($2.2 B to $3.9 B).
  • The single biggest application (by storage capacity) for digital storage in the next several years as well as one of the most challenging is the digital conversion of film, video tape and other analog formats
  • Over 106 Exabytes of new digital storage will be used for digital archiving and content conversion and preservation by 2022
  • Storage in remote “clouds” is playing an important role in enabling collaborative workflows and in archiving
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Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Aberdeen
  • CalDigit
  • EVS
  • IEEI TV
  • others
  • Scale Logic
  • MORE

1. Acknowledgements

2. The Author

3. Executive Summary

  • Key Points

4. Introduction

5. Cinema and Video Formats

6. Media and Entertainment Professional Storage Survey

7. Content Creation and Acquisition

  • Feature Film Acquisition
  • TV Production
  • Film Scanning
  • Storage Capacity Projections for Digital Content Acquisition

8. Post Production including Editing and Special Effects

  • Non-Linear Editing (NLE)
  • Special Effects and Other Post Production
  • Summary Post-Production Digital Storage Capacity Demand
  • Storage Capacity and Storage Revenue Projections for NLE, Special Effects and Other Post Production Activities

9. Media and Entertainment Content Distribution

  • Lower Bandwidth Richer Media Distribution Technology
  • Local Broadcast
    • Cable Distribution
    • Satellite Headend
    • TV Networks
  • Digital Cinema

10. Hard Disk Drives Used in Digital Cinema

  • Professional Media and Entertainment Internet Distribution
  • Video on Demand (VOD)

11. Summary of Non-Archive Entertainment and Media Storage

12. Archiving and Digital Preservation

  • Hard Disk Drives
  • Magnetic Tape
  • Optical Discs
  • Cloud and Object Archive Storage
  • Survey Archive Results
  • Digital Conversion of Older Analog Content
  • Costs of Digital Conversion
  • Costs of Long Term Storage
  • Archiving of Digital Created Content
  • Total Archive and Preservation Storage Projections
  • Archiving Storage: Off-line, Near-Line, in the Cloud
  • Uses of Archived Content-Making an Archive ROI
  • Migration of Content to Avoid Format Obsolescence

13. Capacity Requirements by Market Segment

14. Storage Revenue Estimates by Market Segment

15. Storage Media Projections

  • Touch Rate Versus Response Time
    • Response time definition
    • Touch rate definition
    • Touch rate vs. response time
    • Technology regions
    • IO Object size curve
  • Media Projections for Media and Entertainment

16. Conclusions

17. Some Media and Entertainment Market Companies

18. Newsletter Subscriptions

Table of Figures
Figure 1. Digital Entertainment Content Value Chain (An Accelerating Positive Feedback Loop)
Figure 2. Digital Entertainment Content Workflow
Figure 3. Hybrid Motion Picture Production and Post-Production using Digital Intermediates
Figure 4. Size Comparison of Raw Camera and Digital Intermediary Files
Figure 5. Video Resolution Comparisons
Figure 6. Content is made up of Essence plus Metadata
Figure 7. Uses and Flow of Metadata in the Entertainment Content Process
Figure 8. Sphericam VR Video Camera Setup
Figure 9. Jaunt One Video Camera Rig
Figure 10. Spherical Image Display
Figure 11. ARRI ALEXI Stereoscopic Video Camera Setup
Figure 12. Canon C300 DSLR Used for Professional Video
Figure 13. For-A Super Slo-Mo Camera
Figure 14. BBC Image of an HNK Super Hi-Vision Camera
Figure 15. Sharp 8K X 4K LCD Display at 2012 CES
Figure 16. NHK 8K SHV Field Camera
Figure 17. Percentage of Various Recording Media in Professional Video Cameras
Figure 18. FOR-A Video Archive Recorder
Figure 19. Content Shot for an Hour of Completed Work
Figure 20. Panasonic Micro P2 Flash Module and Adapter
Figure 21. Panasonic P2 and Sony SxS Flash Memory Camcorder Module
Figure 22. Sony External SSD Video Recording SSD
Figure 23. SanDisk CFast Compact Flash Card
Figure 24. Lexar microSD U3 Card for Media Content Captur
Figure 25. Atmos Master Caddy
Figure 26. Maxell iVDR Storage Module on a Sony Professional Camera
Figure 27. LaCie 2big Dock Thunderbo Drive
Figure 28. NHK Super High Vision Equipment Roadmap
Figure 29. Percentage Scanned into Different Digital Resolutions
Figure 30. Digital Content Generation Capacity Projection
Figure 31. Annual Storage System Capacity Growth for Digital Content Acquisition
Figure 32. Professional Non-Linear Editing Model System
Figure 33. DAS vs. Shared Storage and Number of People in a Post Facility (2016 survey)
Figure 34. AWS Snowball Data Transport Solution
Figure 35. Example Render Farm Layout
Figure 36. Pixar Render Farm
Figure 37. Physical Distribution Media for Proxies or Completed Post Work
Figure 38. Post Production Storage Capacity Annual Demand (TB)
Figure 39. Projections for Post Production, CGI/FX New Storage Requirements

Figure 40. Price of Storage/GB for Facility Niche
Figure 41. Toshiba On-Air Max Flash
Figure 42. Bit Rate Reduction Curve Showing Big-Rate Savings between H.264 and HEVC (Horizontal Axis indicates Quality Target Resolution)
Figure 43. Local Broadcaster Content Distribution Storage Capacity Analys
Figure 44. Estimate of Local Broadcaster Distribution Network Storage TAMM)
Figure 45. Cable Head End Distribution Storage Capacity Analysis
Figure 46. Estimate of Cable Head End Network Storage TAMM)
Figure 47. Satellite Head End Distribution Storage Capacity Analysis
Figure 48. Estimate of Satellite Headend Network Storage TAMM)
Figure 49. TV Network Delivery Storage Capacity Analysis
Figure 50. Estimate of TV Networks Local Near-Line and Cloud Storage Capacity (TB)
Figure 51. Estimate of TV Networks Network Storage TAMM)
Figure 52. USB Hard Drive for Movie Distribution to Theatre (Mercado Theatre in Santa Clara, CA)
Figure 53. Schematic of a Play-To-Screen Server with Functional Blocks (Thompson Grass Valley)
Figure 54. Digital Cinema Projector
Figure 55. Schematic Digital Projector Showing IMB Containing Content Storage (a) and with content storage external to the IMB (b)
Figure 56. Integrated Media Block Containing HDDs
Figure 57. Annual New Storage Capacity for Digital Cinema
Figure 58. Estimate of Digital Cinema Storage TAMM)
Figure 59. Internet Content Distribution System (CDN
Figure 60. Level 3’s Content Delivery Network
Figure 61. Internet Content Delivery Storage Capacity Analysis
Figure 62. Estimate of Internet Content Delivery Network Storage TAMM)
Figure 63. IBM Flash-based Content-Delivery Servers
Figure 64. Video on Demand Total Storage Capacity Model
Figure 65. Annual Growth in Video on Demand Storage Capacity
Figure 66. Estimate of VOD Storage TAM by CategoryM)
Figure 67. Estimate of Cloud and Conventional VOD Storage Capacity
Figure 68. Non-Archive Media and Entertainment Annual Network Storage TAM Estimate
Figure 69. Non-Archive On-Line Network Annual Storage TAM Estimate
Figure 70. Non-Archive Near-Line Network Annual Storage TAM Estimate
Figure 71. Non-Archive Object Storage Annual TAM Estimate
Figure 72. Non-Archive Direct Attached and Local Storage Annual TAM Estimate
Figure 73. Total Non-Archive Storage Annual TAM Estimate
Figure 74. Non-Archive Network Storage Capacity Annual Demand Estima
Figure 75. Non-Archive On-Line Network Storage Capacity Annual Demand Estimate
Figure 76. Non-Archive Near-Line Network Storage Capacity Annual Demand Estimate
Figure 77. Non-Archive Object Storage Capacity Annual Demand Estimate
Figure 78. Non-Archive Direct Attached Storage and Local Storage Capacity Annual Demand Estimate
Figure 79. Non-Archive Total Storage Capacity Annual Demand Estimate
Figure 80. HDD Cartridge Products (iVDR and RDX)
Figure 81. Spectra Logic SMR HDD Archive Storage System
Figure 82. ATSC HDD Technology Roadmap
Figure 83. LTO Projected Tape Generations
Figure 84. LTO-7 Tape Cartridge
Figure 85. Uses for LTFS Tape in Media and Entertainment Workflows
Figure 86. Sony/Panasonic Optical Archive Roadmap
Figure 87. Sony Blu-Ray Optical Disc Cartridge and Driv
Figure 88. XenData Tape and Optical Disc LIbrary
Figure 89. Elements in an AXF Object Wrapper
Figure 90. Percentage of Digital Long-Term Archives on Various Medi
Figure 91. Percentage of Tape Formats Used in Digital Archiving
Figure 92. Example Workflow for Analog to Digital Video Conversion
Figure 93. Total Annual Digital Storage Demand Projections for Archiving and Digital Content Conversion & Preservation
Figure 94. Annual Near-Line and Off-Line Digital Storage for Content Archiving
Figure 95. Annual Archive Object Storage for Content Archiving
Figure 96. Cloud vs. Local Archive Storage
Figure 97. Relationship Between Archive Content and Multiple Real-Time and Non-Real-Time Distribution Content
Figure 98. Media and Entertainment Cloud Storage Capacity Projections
Figure 99. Media and Entertainment Object Storage Capacity Projections
Figure 100. Media and Entertainment Cloud Storage Revenue Projections
Figure 101. Media and Entertainment Object Storage Revenue Projection
Figure 102. Touch rate versus response time indicating various types of us
Figure 103. Digital storage technologies regions overlaid on the Touch Rate/Response Time chart
Figure 104. Touch/Y and response time for 100% random IO in TB capacity HDD
Figure 105. Touch/Y and response time for TB capacity HDD, LTO Tape and Blu-ray Discs
Figure 106. Media Annual Revenue Estimate SummaryM)
Figure 107. Tape Cartridge Annual Unit Shipment Projections
Figure 108. Optical Disk Unit Annual Unit Shipment Projections
Figure 109. HDD & Flash Annual Unit Shipment Projections
Figure 110. Distribution of Storage Capacity for Entertainment Creation, Archiving, and Distribution Segments (2016)
Figure 111. Distribution of Storage Capacity for Entertainment Creation, Archiving, and Distribution Segments (2022)
Figure 112. Media and Entertainment Market Storage Revenue Share by Segment (2016)
Figure 113. Media and Entertainment Market Storage Revenue Share by Segment (2022)
Figure 114. Market Share of Storage Media by Storage Capacity Shipped (2016) Figure 115. Market Share of Storage Media by Storage Capacity Shipped (2022)

List of Tables:
Table 1. Example Resolution, Data Rates and Storage Capacity Requirements for Professional Media Content (assumes no chroma subsampling)
Table 2. Some 4K and Beyond Camera Codecs
Table 3. Feature Film Metrics (24 fps, 10-bit color, 4K Bayer Format)
Table 4. Percentage of Survey Participants in Content Market Segment
Table 5. Survey Participant Location
Table 6. Uncompressed Format Assumptions for 1 Hour of Full Resolution Raw Content
Table 7. Comparison of Professional Video Camera Media Trends
Table 8. Survey Question: What % of your Content is Born Digital
Table 9. Comparison of 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 Hours Shot for an Hour of Completed Content
Table 10. Comparison of 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 Scanned Resolutions
Table 11. Feature Film Projection Assumptions
Table 12. TV Broadcast Assumptions
Table 13. TV Episodic Assumptions
Table 14. General Assumptions for Movie & TV Content
Table 15. Feature Film Scanning Digital Storage Requirements
Table 16. Assumptions for Film Scanning Projections
Table 17. Assumptions for Storage Systems Capacity Projections
Table 18. Professional NLE Bandwidth Requirements
Table 19. Proxy Distribution Media Trends
Table 20. Professional Post-Production Storage Assumptions
Table 21. Professional Post Production Storage Projections (High End)
Table 22. Special Effects and Other Special Production Activities Storage Projections
Table 23. World-Wide Post Facilities Capacity Growth Estimates (On-Line, Near- Line and DAS/Local)
Table 24. Post-Production Facility Spending Assumptions
Table 25. World-Wide HE/MR NLE Facilities Network Storage Spending Estimates
Table 26. Content Percentage on Physical Media for Content Distributio
Table 27. Comparison of Costs for Streaming Content with HDDs and SSDs
Table 28. Additional Assumptions on Local Broadcast Content
Table 29. Estimate of WW Local Broadcast Storage Capacity Requirements and Spending
Table 30. Cable Head End Assumptions
Table 31. Estimate of WW Cable Head End Storage Spending
Table 32. Satellite Headend Assumptions
Table 33. Estimate of WW Satellite Head End Storage Spending
Table 34. TV Master Network Assumptions
Table 35. Estimate of WW TV Master Network Storage Spending
Table 36. Comparison of Costs for Distribution with Various Optical Media as well as Hard Disk Drives
Table 37. Digital Cinema Expected Cost Reductions
Table 38. Digital Cinema Storage Estimate Assumptions
Table 39. Digital Cinema Storage Estimate
Table 40. Internet Content Delivery Assumptions
Table 41. Estimate of WW Internet Content Delivery Storage Spending
Table 42. VOD Capacity Model Assumptions
Table 43. Video on Demand Storage Capacity Model (TB)
Table 44. Percentage Growth Rate of Archival Media Types
Table 45. 2006 Estimated Costs for Archiving Motion Picture Materials on HDD Arrays and a Tape Library for Year 1 (1 TB)29
Table 46. Assumptions for Archiving and Digital Preservation
Table 47. Archiving and Digital Conversion and Preservation Storage Projections
Table 48. Annual New Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 49. Annual New Direct Attached and Local Storage Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 50. Annual New Total Networked Storage Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 51. Annual New On-Line Networked Storage Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 52. Annual New Near-Line Networked Storage Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 53. Annual New Object Storage Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 54. Annual Cloud Storage Capacity Projections by Media and Entertainment Market (Petabytes)
Table 55. Total Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 56. Direct Attached and Local Storage Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 57. Total Network Storage Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 58. On-Line Network Storage Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 59. Near-Line Network Storage Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 60. Object Storage Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 61. Off-Line Storage Entertainment and Media Storage Revenue EstimateM)
Table 62. Media Unit Storage Capacity and Price Assumption
Table 63. Detailed Annual New Media Unit Breakdown by Application
Table 64. Annual New Media Unit Summary

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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Archiving:

  • Archiware
  • ASACA
  • BDT Products
  • Falconstor
  • Fujifilm
  • GPL Technologies
  • HGST,Hitachi LG
  • Hollywood Vaults
  • IBM
  • Imagine Communications
  • Imation
  • Iron Mountain,Masstech
  • MediaDB
  • Memnon
  • Optical Vaults
  • Oracle/Sun
  • Proservica
  • Qualstar
  • Quantum,Panasonic
  • SGL
  • Seagate
  • SolaraTec
  • Sony
  • Spectra Logic
  • StorageDNA
  • Xendata
  • other Optical Jukebox and Tape System suppliers

CloudStorage:

  • Aframe
  • Amazon Web Services
  • Avere
  • BridgeStor,Cleversafe (part of IBM) Cloud Sigma
  • Cleversafe
  • DDN
  • Deluxe
  • Dternity
  • Google,GPL Technologies
  • GRUS
  • MediaSilo
  • NTT
  • Oracle
  • Permivault
  • Preservica
  • Quantum,Scality
  • Storiant
  • Sagecloud
  • Sony
  • T3Media (formerly Thought Equity Motion)
  • Zadara

Digital Cameras:

  • ARRI
  • Black Magic
  • Canon
  • Grass Valley
  • Ikegami
  • Panasonic
  • Sony

Digital Distribution:

  • Aframe
  • Aspera (part of IBM)
  • BitSpeed
  • Bright Systems
  • Broadbus
  • Concurrent
  • Data Direct
  • EMC/Isilon
  • EVS
  • Exelis,Fusion-io
  • Grass Valley
  • Harmonic
  • IBM
  • Maximum Throughput
  • Mediacloud
  • Oracle,Quantel
  • Scayl
  • SeaChange
  • SGI
  • Sony
  • USL Inc
  • others

Digital Editing:

  • Apple
  • Autodesk
  • Avid
  • Adobe
  • EditShare
  • Sony

Direct Attached Storage:

  • Advanced Industrial Computer (AIC)
  • Akitio
  • Anhsin Technology
  • Atmos
  • ATTO,Avid
  • Buffalo
  • CalDigit
  • Ciphertex
  • Codex
  • Dot Hill (part of Seagate)
  • Elgato
  • Facilis,Fast Forward Video
  • G-Tech (Hitachi GST)
  • Huawei
  • JMR
  • LaCie/Seagate
  • One StopSystems
  • OWC
  • Promax
  • Promise
  • Samsung
  • Sonnet
  • Tiger Tech
  • Transcend
  • WesternDigital
  • Xstore
  • Violin Memory
  • many others

Ingest and Transcoding:

  • Adtec
  • Ardendo
  • Avere
  • Cintel
  • DigitalRapids
  • Electric Pictures
  • Front Porch Digital (part of Oracle)
  • Grass Valley,IBM
  • Qube
  • Tolis Group
  • Virage

Near line and On-line Storage:

  • Aberdeen
  • Accusys
  • AIC
  • Apace
  • ATTO
  • Avere
  • Avid,Bit Central
  • Bright Systems
  • Ciphertex
  • Chenbro
  • Commandsoft
  • DataDirectNetworks
  • DDP
  • DotHill (part of Seagate)
  • DVS Digital
  • EchoStreams
  • EditShare
  • EMC/Isilon
  • EVS
  • Facilis
  • FilmLight
  • Fujifilm
  • GB Labs
  • GPL Technologies
  • Grass Valley
  • Harmonic
  • Harris
  • HDS
  • HGST/WD
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • Infortrend
  • JMR
  • LSI Logic
  • NetApp
  • NexSan
  • Nexenta
  • Nexto
  • NTT
  • Oracle/Sun
  • Panasas
  • Proavio
  • Promax
  • Promise
  • Pure Storage
  • Qnap
  • Qumulo,Quantum
  • RAIDIX
  • Raidundant
  • Rohde and Schwarz
  • Ross Video
  • Sanbolic
  • SanDisk
  • SANSolutions
  • Scale Logic
  • Seagate Technologies
  • SGI
  • SNS
  • Sonnet
  • Tiger Tech
  • Virident,XOR
  • Zadara
  • many other storage companies

Rendering:

  • Avere
  • Google
  • Panasas

Storage Media:

  • Dulce
  • Fuji Film
  • Fujitsu
  • Iomega
  • Maxell
  • Panasonic
  • Samsung
  • SanDisk,Seagate
  • Sony
  • Toshiba
  • Western Digital

VARs and Integrators:

  • Cloud Options
  • CloudMediaHub
  • Grass Valley
  • Harris
  • IEEI TV
  • IBM
  • IMT
  • Marquis,Miranda
  • MBX Systems
  • ReelData
  • Rorke Data
  • SGI
  • Sony
  • many others
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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