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Metal 3D Printing Services: Service Revenues, Printer Purchases and Materials Consumption - 2018 to 2027

  • ID: 4661697
  • Report
  • 135 pages
  • SmarTech Markets Publishing LLC
1 of 5

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • 3D Hubs (The Netherlands)
  • citim XJet
  • FIT (Germany)
  • Hoganas (Sweden)
  • Materialise (Belgium)
  • Sculpteo (France)
  • MORE

This report analyzes the opportunities and value propositions for metal 3D printing services from the perspective of the service bureaus (including specialty metal service bureaus) themselves and of printer makers, materials firms and the end user community.

The coverage of this report includes:

New directions and strategies for service bureaus.
Metal printing is challenging and expertise in this area may protect service bureau from losing business to end users who buy their own printers. Some service bureaus believe additive manufacturing is a tool that can take market share from traditional metal working firms. Will the new desktop metal printing technology create new opportunities for service bureaus?

Metal powder firm strategies for the service bureau sector.
These strategies include both increasing sales of metal powders to service bureau and growing metal powder businesses by entering the service bureau directly

Service bureau opportunities for traditional third-party suppliers - hybrid manufacturing strategies.
Some traditional machine shops have become early adopters of metal additive manufacturing. Metal 3D printing processes are increasingly used by third-party parts and prototype firms, leading to hybrid manufacturing arrangements incorporating 3D printing along with established processes such as casting

The future of 3D printer makers in the metal service bureau industry.
Selling more metal machines to service bureaus, while strengthening their own metal service offerings

This report provides ten-year forecasts of service provider revenues, broken out by type of service provider; along with the projections of printers, processes and the types of metals used by service providers of different types. In addition, we analyze the future goals and strategies of leading firms – including printer makers - who make metal 3DP services a major part of their business activities.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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FEATURED COMPANIES

  • 3D Hubs (The Netherlands)
  • citim XJet
  • FIT (Germany)
  • Hoganas (Sweden)
  • Materialise (Belgium)
  • Sculpteo (France)
  • MORE

Executive Summary   

E.1 Service Bureaus and the Metals Additive Manufacturing Boom
E.2 Emerging Strategies for Metal Service Provider Evolution
E.2.1 3D Metals Printing: What’s Next in the Metals Shop?
E.2.2 Playing the Quality Card in the 3D Metals Service Bureau
E.2.3 Marketing to the Fore: HP, GE and Value Added
E.2.4 Software to the Fore: Metal Service Provider Networks
E.2.5 One Metal to Rule them All: MTI
E.2.6 Service Bureaus Give End Users the Opportunity to Try Out Printers Before Buying: Service Bureaus But Not for Their Own Sake
E.3 Summary of Ten-year Forecasts Contained in this Report
E.3.1 Forecasts of Service Revenue by Type of End User
E.3.2 Forecast of Service Revenue by Type of Process Used
E.3.3 Forecast by Types of Metal Used

Chapter One: Introduction   
1.1 Background to this Report
1.1.1 Current Drivers for Metals Printing in the Service Provider Environment
1.1.2 Metals-oriented Service Providers: Four Types of Metal-Oriented Service Provider
1.2 Goal and Scope of this Report
1.3 Methodology of this Report
1.4 Plan of this Report

Chapter Two: Business Characteristics of Metal-Printing Service Bureau
2.1 Market Drivers, Profitability and Marketing
2.2 Adding Value with Design, Marketing and Advice
2.3 Cloud- and Hub-Based Services: Service Bureaus as an IT play
2.4 Conventional Metal Services Bureau: Marketing and Hybrid Manufacturing
2.4.1 Hybrid Metals Manufacturing: Additive Manufacturing plus Traditional Methods
2.4.2 Role of Desktop Metal Printing at Service Bureaus
2.5 Summary of Key Points in this Chapter

Chapter Three: Markets, Demand Patterns and Ten-year Forecasts
3.1 Metal AM Service Providers: Demand Structure
3.2 Demand for Metal Service Providers from the Aerospace Sector
3.2.1 Service Bureaus as Risk Avoidance in the Aerospace Industry
3.2.2 Role of Metal AM Service Bureaus and Third-Party Metals Manufacturers in the Aerospace Industry
3.2.3 Success Factors for AM Metal Services in the Aerospace Industry
3.2.4 Parts Manufactured and Companies Served
3.2.5 Ten-year Forecast of Metals Service Bureau Revenues and Expenditures
3.3 Demand for Metal Service Providers from the Automotive Sector
3.3.1 Metal Service Bureaus for the Automotive Industry
3.3.2 Auto Parts Manufactured by Service Bureaus
3.3.3 Metal AM Materials and Machines Used in Automotive
3.3.4 Ten-year Forecast of Metals Service Bureau Revenues and Expenditures
3.4 Oil and Gas Industry
3.4.1 Value of AM in the Oil and Gas Industry: Parts Printed
3.4.2 Components for Gas Processing and Refinery Operations
3.4.3 Impact of Non-Specialist Service Bureaus
3.4.4 Impact of Specialist Oil and Gas Service Bureaus
3.4.5 Special Considerations for AM Materials in the Oil and Gas Industry
3.4.6 Ten-year Forecast of Metals Service Bureau Revenues and Expenditures
3.5 Medical and Healthcare
3.5.1 Implants
3.5.2 Metal Hearing Aids
3.5.3 Service Providers in the Medical AM Market
3.5.4 Ten-year Forecast of Metals Service Bureau Revenues and Expenditures
3.6 Dental Industry
3.6.1 Additive vs. Subtractive in Digital Dentistry
3.6.2 International Differences
3.6.3 Metal Printing Technology Development Considerations
3.6.4 Printing Companies Active in 3D Printing for Milling Centers
3.6.5 Dental Metal Powder: International Distribution
3.6.6 Ten-year Forecast of Metals Service Bureau Revenues and Expenditures
3.7 AM Metal Service Bureaus in Other Industrial Markets
3.7.1 Ten-year Forecast of Metals Service Bureau Revenues and Expenditures
3.8 Key Points from this Chapter

Chapter Four: Strategic Analysis of Leading 3D Printing Services
4.1 3D Systems (United States)
4.1.1 On-Demand Metal Printing Services
4.1.2 Financial Implications of 3D Systems’ Service Bureau Offerings
4.1.3 Author’s Perspective on 3D Systems in the Metal Service Provider Business
4.2 BeamIT (Italy)
4.2.1 Metals Orientation
4.2.2 Author’s Perspective on BeamIT in the Metal Service Business
4.3 Burloak Technologies (Canada)
4.3.1 Services Offered by Burloak
4.3.2 Role of Burloaks’ Additive Manufacturing Center of Excellence
4.3.3 Important Burloak’s Alliances
4.3.4 Author’s Perspective on Burloak in the Metal Service Business
4.4 Carpenter/CalRAM (United States)
4.4.1 Acquisition of CalRAM
4.4.2 Other Service Provider-related Developments
4.4.3 Author’s Perspective on Carpenter in the Metal Services Business
4.5 DM3D (United States)
4.5.1 DMD Resources
4.5.2 Author’s Perspective on DM3D in the Metal Service Business
4.6 ExOne (United States)
4.6.1 Services
4.6.2 Author’s Perspective on ExOne in the Metal Services Business
4.7 FIT (Germany)
4.7.1 Manufacturing Sites
4.7.2 Medical Services
4.7.3 Perspective on FIT in the Metal Service Business
4.8 GE Additive
4.8.1 AddWorks
4.8.2 GE Manufacturing Partner Network
4.8.3 Supply of Machines to Service Providers
4.8.4 Perspective on GE Additive in the Metal Service Business
4.9 Hoganas (Sweden)
4.9.1 Author’s Take on Hoganas in the Metal Service Business
4.10 HP (United States)
4.10.1 HP Enters the Metal Service Bureau Business
4.10.2 Author’s Perspective on HP in the Metal Service Business
4.11 i3DMFG (United States)
4.11.1 Author’s Perspective on i3DMFG in the Metal Service Business
4.12 Materialise (Belgium)
4.12.1 ACTech Acquisition
4.12.2 Automotive Services
4.12.3 Author’s Perspective on Materialise in the Metal Services Business
4.13 MTI (Metal Technology Incorporated)
4.13.1 Move into Motor Sports
4.13.2 Author’s Perspective on MTI in Metal Services
4.14 Oerlikon/citim (Switzerland)
4.14.1 Oerlikon End-user Focus
4.14.2 citim
4.14.3 Alliance with XJet
4.14.4 Oerlikon Print Facilities
14.4.5 Author’s Perspective on Oerlikon in the Metal Services Business
4.15 Protolabs (United States)
4.15.1 3D Printing Business
4.15.2 Author’s Perspective on ProtoLabs in the Metals Services Business
4.16 Renishaw (United Kingdom)
4.16.1 Renishaw Solutions Centres
4.16.2 Alliance with Infosys
4.16.3 Author’s Perspective on Renishaw in the Metals Services Business
4.17 Sculpteo (France)
4.17.1 Software Strategies
4.17.2 Author’s Perspective on Sculpteo in the Metal Service Bureau
4.18 Sintavia (United States)
4.18.1 Machines Owned: Installed Base
4.18.2 Alliances with Other Companies
4.18.3 Author’s Perspective on Sintavia in the Metal Service Business
4.19 Siemens/Material Solutions (Germany/U.K.)
4.19.1 Metals, Customers and Products
4.19.2 AM Machines Used
4.19.3 Author’s Perspective on Materials Solutions in the Metal Service Business
4.20 Stratasys Direct Manufacturing (United States/Israel)
4.20.1 Author’s Perspective on SDM in the Metal Service Business
4.21 voestalpine (Austria)
4.21.1 Global AM Center Expansion at voestalpine
4.21.2 Author’s Perspective on voestalpine in the Metal Service Business
4.22 Metal Service Provider Networks
4.22.1 3D Hubs (The Netherlands)
4.22.2 Hitch3DPrint (Singapore)
4.22.3 Xometry (United States)

About the Analyst
Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report

List of Exhibits
Exhibit E-1: Drivers for Metal Service Bureaus
Exhibit E-2: Ten-year Forecasts of Metal Service Bureau Revenues by End-User Segment ($ Millions)
Exhibit E-3: Ten-year Forecasts by Type of Machine/Process Used by Service Bureaus ($ Millions)
Exhibit E-4: Ten-year Forecasts of Materials Consumed by Metal Service Bureaus ($ Millions)
Exhibit 1-1: Metal Service Providers by Type and Motivation
Exhibit 3-1: Service Revenues from Printing Metal Parts for the Aerospace Industry: By Print Technology ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-2: Market for Metals Used in Printing Parts for the Aerospace Industry
Exhibit 3-3: Market for Machines Used in Printing Parts for the Aerospace Industry
Exhibit 3-4: Aggregate Revenue from 3D Printing of Aerospace Parts by Geography ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-5: Metal Parts Printed by Service Bureaus for the Aerospace Industry
Exhibit 3-6: Comparison Between Types of Metal Units Produced by External AM Services and Suppliers 2017 vs 2028
Exhibit 3-7: Service Revenues from Printing Metal Parts for the Automotive Industry: By Print Technology ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-8: Market for Metals Used in Printing Parts for the Automotive Industry
Exhibit 3-9: Market for Machines Used in Printing Parts for the Automotive Industry
Exhibit 3-10: Aggregate Revenue from 3D Printing of Automotive Parts by Geography ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-11: Metal Parts Printed by Service Bureau for the Automotive Industry
Exhibit 3-12: Service Revenues from Printing Metal Parts for the Oil and Gas Industry: By Print Technology ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-13: Market for Metals Used in Printing Parts for the Oil and Gas Industry
Exhibit 3-14: Market for Machines Used in Printing Parts for the Oil and Gas Industry
Exhibit 3-15: Aggregate Revenue from 3D Printing of Oil and Gas Parts by Geography ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-16: Metal Parts Printed by Service Bureau for the Oil and Gas Industry
Exhibit 3-17: Service Revenues from Printing Metal Parts for the Medical Sector: By Print Technology ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-18: Market for Metals Used in Printing Parts for the Medical Sector
Exhibit 3-19: Market for Machines Used in Printing Parts for the Medical Sector
Exhibit 3-20: Aggregate Revenue from 3D Printing of Medical Parts by Geography ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-21: Service Revenues from Printing Metal Parts for the Dental Sector: By Print Technology ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-22: Market for Metals Used in Printing Parts for the Dental Sector
Exhibit 3-23: Market for Machines Used in Printing Parts for the Dental Sector
Exhibit 3-24: Aggregate Revenue from 3D Printing of Dental Parts by Geography ($ Millions)
Exhibit 3-25: Ten-year Forecasts of Other Revenues Generated by Metal Service Bureau ($ Millions)
Exhibit 4-1: Materialise – Installed Base of Metals Printers

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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FEATURED COMPANIES

  • 3D Hubs (The Netherlands)
  • citim XJet
  • FIT (Germany)
  • Hoganas (Sweden)
  • Materialise (Belgium)
  • Sculpteo (France)
  • MORE

Five Reasons Why Companies Are Turning to Service Bureaus

Additive manufacturing of metal is popular, but some end-user companies are reticent about in-house printing of metals parts. This is, we believe, a powerful factor creating opportunities for metal AM service bureaus. This article defines five factors that have some service bureaus planning for a doubling the number of metal machines this year (2019).

#1 Metals Printing Can be Trouble

In the future service bureaus are likely to lose business to in-house 3D printer deployments for polymer printing, but their metals business may increase. Additive manufacturing with polymers is more user-friendly than metals printing making the capital and expertise easier for end users to move the process in-house. There are more process parameters and knowledge involved with metal printing. And, on the materials side, new metals may require special techniques and expertise that are not easily or quickly achieved in-house. This “tribal” knowledge will help service bureaus keep their competitive advantage longer as metal AM becomes more cost-effective and user-friendly.

Metal 3D printers will reduce in cost in the next few years – we have already seen how this could happen from the latest HP and Desktop Metal products. Nonetheless, the researcher believes that the combination service provider knowledge, supply chain efficiencies, and the high-capital cost will keep metal service bureaus competitive for the foreseeable future.

#2 The “Hot Topic Effect”

The current high level of publicity being afforded to metal printing automatically enhances the prospects for metal service bureaus. Hot topics are, by definition, of immediate importance, but they tend to cool down relatively quickly. It is to be expected that metal additive manufacturing will eventually become less hot as it matures and becomes just another process in the engineering toolbox. Yet, less attention doesn’t necessarily mean that market growth would stop, just that investors’ enthusiasm might shrink.

#3 Lack of User Capital and Low ROI

A classic driver for companies to not 3D print in-house is that some companies just don’t have the capital. The impact of this market driver in metal AM is likely to intensify in the future as more end-user firms find they have a need for metal AM but cannot justify the capex.

Service bureaus also offer a way for companies to dip their toes in the AM metals business without having to invest heavily in the equipment, expertise, or time associated with bringing the process in-house. Some companies may even have the capital, but due to fluctuations and volumes, the return on investment (ROI) of in-house metal AM is too low to make it viable. Offering metal 3D printing won’t tie down a service bureau, and a company can test the market to verify a parts value before investing the capital to move production in-house.

#4 Size, Complexity and Service Bureaus

Service bureaus may be able to handle large and complex parts more effectively and efficiently than in-house printing can. Being able to process large parts will give a service bureau additional value. Bringing metal printing in-house is already difficult enough, adding larger more expensive equipment adds complexity.

Finally, understanding different materials, process capabilities, and how complex features can change a design will be the experience service bureaus should have that will prevent or delay companies from moving in-house. Simple design concepts, post processing, and even part orientation can help produce a better product.

#5 Industry Focus Helps

Expertise in a particular industry provides a competitive advantage for service bureaus. It enables a service bureau to better understand its customers and for both customers and service bureaus to interact in a more effective way. As a result, some service bureaus are specializing in customers from the aerospace industry or the medical sector. Specialized automotive service bureaus are also expected to appear in the near future.

These comments apply to polymer AM as well as metals AM, but we note that specialist aerospace and automotive bureaus both have a strong metals orientation. Metals service bureaus that understand the needs, operations and traditions of big metal-using industry sectors are in a better position to win customers than those who don’t.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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  • 3D Hubs (The Netherlands)
  • ACTech Acquisition
  • BeamIT (Italy)
  • Burloak Technologies (Canada)
  • Carpenter/CalRAM (United States)
  • citim XJet
  • DM3D (United States)
  • ExOne (United States)
  • FIT (Germany)
  • GE Additive
  • HP (United States)
  • Hitch3DPrint (Singapore)
  • Hoganas (Sweden)
  • i3DMFG (United States)
  • MTI (Metal Technology Incorporated)
  • Materialise (Belgium)
  • Metal Service Provider Networks
  • Oerlikon/citim (Switzerland)
  • Protolabs (United States)
  • Renishaw (United Kingdom)
  • Sculpteo (France)
  • Siemens/Material Solutions (Germany/U.K.)
  • Sintavia (United States)
  • Stratasys Direct Manufacturing (United States/Israel)
  • Xometry (United States)
  • voestalpine (Austria)
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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