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Achieving Sustainable Production of Milk Volume 3

  • ID: 4832895
  • Book
  • 606 pages
  • Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing
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In meeting rising demand, more intensive dairying systems face a range of challenges such as maintaining high standards of safety in the face of the continuing threat from zoonoses entering the food chain, whilst sustaining nutritional and sensory quality. At the same time farms need to become more efficient and sustainable. Finally, farming must also meet higher standards of animal health and welfare. Drawing on an international range of expertise, this book reviews research addressing the welfare, nutrition and health of dairy cattle. Part 1 begins by discussing key issues in welfare followed by topics such as genetic selection and welfare, housing and transportation. Part 2 looks at nutrition with chapters on rumen microbiology, feed evaluation and formulation, feed supplements and feed safety. The final part of the book covers aspects of health such as control of diseases and other disorders such as lameness as well as dairy herd health management. Achieving sustainable production of milk Volume 3: Dairy herd management and welfare will be a standard reference for animal and dairy scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in beef production. It is accompanied by two other volumes which review milk composition, genetics and breeding as well as safety, quality and sustainability.
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Part 1 Welfare of dairy cattle
1. Understanding the behaviour of dairy cattle: C. J. C. Phillips, University of Queensland, Australia;
2. Key issues in the welfare of dairy cattle: Jan Hultgren, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden;
3. Housing and the welfare of dairy cattle: Jeffrey Rushen, University of British Columbia, Canada;
4. Genetic selection for dairy cow welfare and resilience to climate change: Jennie E. Pryce, Agriculture Victoria and La Trobe University, Australia; and Yvette de Haas, Wageningen UR, The Netherlands;
5. Ensuring the welfare of culled dairy cows during transport and slaughter: Carmen Gallo and Ana Strappini, Animal Welfare Programme, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Universidad Austral de Chile, Chile;
6. Ensuring the health and welfare of dairy calves and heifers: Emily Miller-Cushon, University of Florida, USA; Ken Leslie and Trevor DeVries, University of Guelph, Canada;

Part 2 Nutrition of dairy cattle
7. The rumen microbiota and its role in dairy cow production and health: Anusha Bulumulla, Mi Zhou and Le Luo Guan, University of Alberta, Canada;
8. Biochemical and physiological determinants of feed efficiency in dairy cattle: John McNamara, Washington State University, USA;
9. Feed evaluation and formulation to maximise nutritional efficiency in dairy cattle: Pekka Huhtanen, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden;
10. Sustainable nutrition management of dairy cattle in intensive systems: Michel A. Wattiaux, Matias A. Aguerre and Sanjeewa D. Ranathunga, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA;
11. Nutrition management of grazing dairy cows in temperate environments: J. R. Roche, DairyNZ, New Zealand;
12. The use and abuse of cereals, legumes and crop residues in rations for dairy cattle: Michael Blümmel, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Ethiopia; A. Muller, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), and ETH Zürich Switzerland; C. Schader, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland; M. Herrero, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia; and M. R. Garg, National Dairy Development Board (NDDB), India;
13. Feed supplements for dairy cattle: C. Jamie Newbold, Aberystwyth University, UK;

Part 3 Health of dairy cattle
14. Disorder of digestion and metabolism in dairy cattle: the case of subacute rumen acidosis: Gregory B. Penner, University of Saskatchewan, Canada;
15. Management of dairy cows in transition and at calving: Kenneth Nordlund, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA;
16. Causes, prevention and management of infertility in dairy cows: Alexander C. O. Evans, University College Dublin, Ireland; and Shenming Zeng,"China Agriculture University, China;
17. Aetiology, diagnosis and control of mastitis in dairy herds P. Moroni, Cornell University, USA and Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy; F. Welcome, Cornell University, USA; and M.F. Addis, Porto Conte Ricerche, Italy
18. Preventing and managing lameness in dairy cows: Nick Bell, The Royal Veterinary College, UK;
19. Control of infectious diseases in dairy cattle: Wendela Wapenaar, Simon Archer and John Remnant, University of Nottingham, UK; and Alan Murphy, Minster Veterinary Practice, UK;
20. Prevention and control of parasitic helminths in dairy cattle: key issues and challenges: Jacqueline B. Matthews, Moredun Research Institute, UK;
21. Genetic variation in immunity and disease resistance in dairy cows and other livestock: Michael Stear, Karen Fairlie-Clarke, and Nicholas Jonsson, University of Glasgow, UK; Bonnie Mallard, University of Guelph, Canada; and David Groth, Curtin University, Australia;
22. Responsible and sustainable use of medicines in dairy herd health: David C. Barrett, Kristen K. Reyher, Andrea Turner and David A. Tisdall, University of Bristol, UK;
23. Dairy herd health management: an overview: Jonathan Statham, Bishopton Veterinary Group and RAFT Solutions Ltd., UK;
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