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Digitalization of Society and Socio-political Issues 1. Digital, Communication, and Culture. Edition No. 1

  • ID: 5186321
  • Book
  • January 2020
  • 280 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Digitalization is a long and constant sociohistoric process in which all areas of societyÂs activities are reconfigured. Digitalization of Society and Socio-political Issues 1 examines the transformations linked to the development of digital platforms and social media, which affect the cultural and communicational industries. It analyzes the formation of Big Data, their algorithmic processing and the societal changes which result (social monitoring and control in particular). Through critical views, it equally presents the various ways in which technology participates in relations of power and domination, and contributes to possible emancipatory practices.
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Acknowledgments xiii
Éric GEORGE

Introduction xv
Éric GEORGE

Part 1. Digital Technology, Big Data and Societal Transformations 1

Chapter 1. For an Archaeology of the Cult of the Number 3
Armand MATTELART

1.1. Governing by numbers: an old and a new figure 4

1.2. The invention of the calculable individual 5

1.3. Control as a mass phenomenon 6

1.4. The techno-security paradigm 8

1.5. The fascination for Big Data 10

1.6. The shadows of the number cult 12

1.7. References 13

Chapter 2. Big Data as a Device for Generalized Decoding of the Social Field 15
Fabien RICHERT

2.1. Coding, decoding and axiomatization 16

2.2. The role of Big Data 20

2.3. Semiocapitalism 21

2.4. Digital labor 22

2.5. Conclusion 23

2.6. References 25

Chapter 3. Algorithmic Management, Organizational Changes and the Digitalization of HR Practices: A Critical Perspective 27
Yanita ANDONOVA

3.1 Digital transformations and business developments 28

3.2. Digitalization of the HR function: practices and tools 31

3.3. Which communication approach for studying these phenomena and their social consequences? 33

3.4. References 36

Chapter 4. Nanotargeting and Automation of Political Discourse 39
Samuel COSSETTE

4.1. On nanotargeting 39

4.1.1. Segmentation 39

4.1.2. Microtargeting 40

4.1.3. Nanotargeting 41

4.2. On algorithmic governance 43

4.3. Public space and communicative capitalism 44

4.4. On the automation of political discourse 46

4.5. References 47

Chapter 5. Digital Practices, Cultural Practices, Under Surveillance 51
Robert PANICO and Geneviève VIDAL

5.1. Social acceptability of the digital injunction, monitoring devices and digital control 51

5.2. Dilution of cultural practices in digital technology 54

5.3. Conclusion 56

5.4. References 57

Chapter 6. The Hypothesis of the Privacy of Ancients and Moderns 61
Julien ROSSI

6.1. Privacy under discussion 62

6.2. The invention of the right to privacy 63

6.3. The emergence of informational self-determination and the privacy of the Modern 65

6.4. Conclusion 66

6.5. References 67

Chapter 7. Very Precious Memories: Digital Memories and Data Valorization 71
Rémi ROUGE

7.1. The high dependency of start-ups 73

7.1.1. Capturing dormant content 74

7.1.2. Confirming their value 75

7.2. Tagging traffic: the response of dominant platforms 75

7.2.1. Limiting external traffic 75

7.2.2. Introducing new types of data circulation 77

7.3. Conclusion 78

7.4. References 78

Part 2. Digital Technology and Changes in Cultural and Communication Industries 81

Chapter 8. Capital as Power: Facebook and the Symbolic Monopoly Rent 83
Maxime OUELLET

8.1. The debate on value production in social media: digital labor versus affective labor 84

8.2. Capital as power: accumulation through symbolic monopoly rent 85

8.3. The institutional transformations of advanced capitalism: the financialization of the economy and the commodification of knowledge 86

8.3.1. Accumulation on intangible assets and patents 87

8.3.2. Control of communication risks 88

8.3.3. Facebook and the imperial expansion logic of the knowledge monopoly 89

8.4. Conclusion: Facebook and the contradictions of capitalism in the digital age 90

8.5. References 91

Chapter 9. On the “Platformization” of the Culture and Communication Industries 95
Jacob MATTHEWS

9.1. Towards a dilution of the specificities of the culture and communication industries? 96

9.2. The notion of uses of digital intermediation platforms 97

9.3. Strategies of digital intermediation platforms 98

9.4. Conclusion 104

9.5. References 105

Chapter 10. Digital Audiovisual Platforms, Between Transnational Flows and National Frameworks 107
Philippe BOUQUILLION

10.1. Industrial strategies: a trend towards the weakening of national historical audiovisual actors 108

10.2. Public policies: between transnational logic and national policy development 112

10.3. Conclusion 114

10.4. References 114

Chapter 11. Scientific Publishing: Coexistence Between New Entrants and Traditional Players 117
Édith LAVIEC

11.1. Questioning, hypotheses and methodology 118

11.2. Scientific publishing and new entrants in the Rhône-Alpes region 119

11.2.1. Elements of definition 119

11.2.2. About new entrants 120

11.2.3. Some examples of new entrants 120

11.3. Legitimacy and interactions with traditional players in Rhône-Alpes 122

11.3.1. Tendency to circumvent new entrants 122

11.3.2. Legitimacy and collaboration 123

11.3.3. Particularity of GAFA 125

11.4. Conclusion 125

11.5. References 126

Chapter 12. A Digital Redefinition of the Pornography Industries 129
Arnaud ANCIAUX

12.1. Socio-economics of pornography markets and industries: a brief review of the scientific literature 130

12.2. Mobilizing discourse analysis and socio-economic analysis to understand markets and industries 132

12.2.1. Cross-questioning to be carried out 132

12.2.2. An example of deployment: the erased construction of a sexcam industry 133

12.3. Conclusion 135

12.4. References 135

Chapter 13. Cultural Policies 2.0: Rebuilding the Intervention of Public Authorities 139
Maud BOISNARD, Destiny TCHÉHOUALI and Michèle RIOUX

13.1. The transformation of cultural industries; regulatory challenges 140

13.2. Priority issues and possible solutions 142

13.2.1. Financing culture 142

13.2.2. Digital taxation 142

13.2.3. Telecommunications regulation and net neutrality 143

13.2.4. Competition regulation, anti-competitive practices and dominant positions 144

13.2.5. The importance of data: algorithms, metadata and discoverability in support of the diversity of cultural expressions 145

13.3. Conclusion 146

13.4. References 147

Chapter 14. The Digitalization of Cultural Policies in France 149
Anne BELLON

14.1. Digital technology at the Ministry of Culture: a perspective 150

14.2. Opposing coalitions 152

14.3. An industry policy instead of a user policy 154

14.4. Conclusion 155

14.5. References 155

Part 3. Digital Technology and Cultural and Communicational Practices 157

Chapter 15. The Digitalization of Society and a New Form of Connected Sociability in Tunisia 159
Alma BETBOUT

15.1. Research purpose, hypotheses and working methodology 160

15.2. Research results 160

15.2.1. Forms of online sociability among adolescents 161

15.2.2. Sociability around hybrid writing 164

15.3. Conclusion 166

15.4. References 167

Chapter 16. Digitalization and Knowledge at University: Study of Collaborative Student Practices 169
Marie DAVID

16.1. Knowledge as a result of collective work 169

16.2. The survey on the knowledge taught and learned at university 170

16.3. The discovery of digital student practices 170

16.4. Digital uses and collective work of knowledge 171

16.5. Digital exchanges, one dimension among others of students’ collective activity 174

16.6. Conclusion 177

16.7. References 177

Chapter 17. Towards a Generalization of Digital Technology in Education? 179
Cathia PAPI

17.1. The place of technology in education: an old issue that is still relevant today 180

17.2. Field and survey methodology 181

17.3. Towards techno-pedagogical evolutions but not without limits 183

17.4. The development of active pedagogies that integrate digital technologies 183

17.5. Non-generalized practices 185

17.6. Barriers and levers to the widespread use of digital technology in education 186

17.7. Conclusion 187

17.8. References 188

Chapter 18. French Pensioners Facing the Digitalization of Society 191
Lucie DELIAS

18.1. Contemporary digital culture and its implications for the identity and social integration of retired people 192

18.1.1. Digital culture, seniors and “successful aging” 192

18.1.2. The identity dimension of the use of connected computing: getting started and staying involved 194

18.2. E-government: a de facto obligation to use digital tools 196

18.2.1. Outlines of the dematerialization of administrative services 196

18.2.2. Working class pensioners and digital dependency 197

18.3. Conclusion 199

18.4. References 199

Chapter 19. From the Digitalization of Society to the Production of a Biomedicalized Food Culture 201
Myriam DUROCHER

19.1. The biomedicalization of society 202

19.2. The emergence of a biomedicalized food culture 203

19.3. References 207

Conclusion 209
Éric GEORGE

List of Authors 215

Index 217

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Éric George
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