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Image Beyond the Screen. Projection Mapping. Edition No. 1

  • ID: 5186391
  • Book
  • February 2020
  • 270 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Videomapping with its use of digital images is an audiovisual format that has gained traction with the creative industries. It consists of projecting images onto diverse surfaces, according to their geometric characteristics. It is also synonymous with spatial augmented reality, projection mapping and spatial correspondence.

Image Beyond the Screen lays the foundations for a field of interdisciplinary study, encompassing the audiovisual, humanities, and digital creation and technologies. It brings together contributions from researchers, and testimonials from some of the creators, technicians and organizers who now make up the many-faceted community of videomapping.

Live entertainment, museum, urban or event planning, cultural heritage, marketing, industry and the medical field are just a few examples of the applications of this media.
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Foreword xiii

Introduction xvii

Part 1. History and Identity 1

Chapter 1. The Origins of Projection Mapping 3
Ludovic BURCZYKOWSKI

1.1. Introduction 3

1.2. Let’s moonwalk! A short crossing through time 4

1.2.1. The emergence of the expressions “video mapping”, “projection mapping”, “spatial augmented reality” and “spatial correspondence” between the beginning of the 21st Century and the end of the 20th Century 4

1.2.2. From 17th Century magic lanterns to ancient camera obscura 5

1.2.3. The screen as a material considered as a void: projection mapping in negative from the 15th Century onwards 6

1.2.4. How far back in history can we go? 7

1.3. Immersion in hallucinated worlds 8

1.3.1. Some films on the theme of nested or fallacious realities in line with the first digital projection mapping installations 8

1.3.2. Some philosophies of illusion 9

1.4. Examples of visual devices 10

1.4.1. Two visual instruments: anamorphoses and X-rays 11

1.4.2. Immersive panoramas 11

1.4.3. Augmented reality and low-tech virtual reality 12

1.4.4. Some visual sequences spatialized since Antiquity 13

1.5. The agencies 14

1.5.1. The arts of memory 14

1.5.2. Feedback, or the chicken and the egg problem 15

1.5.3. Some practical uses of the magic lantern 16

1.6. A figure of transgression and juxtaposition with a beyond 17

1.6.1. Unconditionality 17

1.6.2. Magic image imagery 18

1.6.3. Anima 20

1.6.4. See from a distance 20

1.7. The invention of an “empty box” as an image container 21

1.7.1. Any precursors? 22

1.7.2. Alberti and the invention of the screen 22

1.7.3. The humanistic context of the disruptive object-subject disconnect reified in and through the image 23

1.7.4. A hypothetical starting point 24

1.8. Modern inflexions: obsolescence of old visual devices and tacit challenges to the Albertian model 25

1.8.1. Obsolescence 25

1.8.2. Challenges 26

1.9. Parastatic scenography 28

1.9.1. For the eyes: the uncomplicated image 28

1.9.2. Living presences and images 29

1.9.3. From the screen to film 30

1.10. From expedition to investigation 32

1.10.1. Resilience 32

1.10.2. Ongoing investigation 33

1.11. Conclusion 34

1.12. References 34

Chapter 2. The “Spatialization” of the Gaze with the Projection Mapping Dispositive 37
Justyna Weronika ŁABĄDŹ

2.1. Introduction 37

2.2. The release of the “cinematographic cocoon” 38

2.3. Changing the projection mapping dispositive 41

2.4. The spatialization of the gaze or the perception of the projection mapping spectator 44

2.5. “Attractions set-up” or real content? 48

2.6. References 49

Chapter 3. Projection Mapping: A New Symbolic Form? 51
Martina STELLA

3.1. Introduction 51

3.1.1. Symbolic form and apparatus 51

3.1.2. Apparatus and projection mapping 53

3.2. A shifting tool 54

3.3. The surface 56

3.3.1. The environment/projection ratio 56

3.3.2. The volume 57

3.3.3. The projection plane: the substrate 59

3.4. The projection 60

3.4.1. The haptic image 60

3.4.2. The point of view or the projector 61

3.5. Conclusion 63

3.6. References 66

Chapter 4. Points of View: Origins, History and Limits of Projection Mapping 69
Ludovic BURCZYKOWSKI and Marine THÉBAULT

4.1. The origins of a movement towards alternative forms according to Romain Tardy 69

4.1.1. Origins and VJing 69

4.1.2. Transformation and continuity 70

4.1.3. Projection mapping and the screen 71

4.1.4. Projection mapping of yesterday, today and tomorrow 72

4.2. A short history of projection mapping according to Dominique Moulon 73

4.2.1. Projection mapping in the history of light 73

4.2.2. The invention of the video projector 74

4.2.3. The feeling of immersion with different applications of projection mapping 75

4.2.4. The role of ICTs today and tomorrow 77

4.3. Projection mapping and its limits according to Christiane Paul 78

4.3.1. The New Aesthetic 78

4.3.2. Projection mapping as a technology 79

4.3.3. Projection mapping as an experience connecting the physical and the virtual 80

4.3.4. Projection mapping and museums or art institutions 81

Part 2. Texts and Techniques 83

Chapter 5. Listening to Creators in Residence 85
Marine THÉBAULT and Daniel SCHMITT

5.1. Creators, a residence and a festival 85

5.2. Capturing the genesis of a work 86

5.3. REMIND: a method to capture the dynamics of the situated creative experience 87

5.4. Space, tool and solitude 88

5.4.1. The instrumental space 89

5.4.2. The dynamics of the emotional states of the creators in situ 97

5.4.3. Work, emotions and troubles 99

5.5. New residence arrangements 100

5.5.1. Limitations and contributions of this type of survey 100

5.5.2. Towards a design of space and experience 100

5.5.3. The creator profession 101

5.6. Prospects for the future 102

5.7. Increased attention to the place of creators in digital arts 103

5.8. Acknowledgements 104

5.9. References 104

Chapter 6. Projection Mapping and Automatic Calibration: Beyond a Technique 107
Sofia KOURKOULAKOU

6.1. Introduction 107

6.2. Towards a new projection dynamic 107

6.3. Automatic calibration 108

6.4. Automatic geometric calibration 109

6.4.1. Procams methods 109

6.4.2. Zhang method (Zhang 1998, 1999) 109

6.5. Projector calibration using one or more pre-calibrated cameras 109

6.5.1. Fringe Pattern/Structured Light DMD (Digital Micromirror Device) 110

6.6. Automatic calibration applied 111

6.7. Automatic calibration in France 112

6.8. Conclusion 112

6.9. References 113

Chapter 7. Projection Mapping Gaming 115
Julian ALVAREZ

7.1. Introduction 115

7.2. Specifying the scope of the projection mapping game 118

7.3. The indoor projection mapping game 119

7.4. The outdoor projection mapping game 123

7.5. Conclusion 125

7.6. References 126

Chapter 8. Projection Mapping and Photogrammetry: Interest, Contribution, Current Limitations and Future Perspectives 127
Nicolas LISSARRAGUE

8.1. Introduction 127

8.2. State of the art 127

8.3. Photogrammetry for projection mapping 129

8.4. Contribution: an automated imaging device for object photogrammetry 130

8.5. Current limitations and future prospects 137

8.6. References 139

Chapter 9. Points of View: Sound, Projection and Interaction 141
Jérémy OURY, Ludovic BURCZYKOWSKI and Marine THÉBAULT

9.1. Sound creation projection mapping, a real composition of sound 141

9.1.1. Introduction 141

9.1.2. The place of sound 142

9.1.3. Analysis of works of art 146

9.1.4. Conclusion 149

9.2. Projectionist: a profession according to Pascal Leroy 150

9.2.1. History 150

9.2.2. Identity and tastes 151

9.2.3. Art and technology 151

9.2.4. Limitations 152

9.2.5. Projection mapping and cinema 152

9.3. Interactive projection mapping by Anne-Laure George-Molland 153

9.3.1. Enter interactivity to make it exist 153

9.3.2. Small interactivity and projection mapping 155

9.3.3. The future of interactivity in projection mapping 156

9.4. References 157

Part 3. Production and Dissemination 159

Chapter 10. The Factory of the Future, Augmented Reality and Projection Mapping 161
Pascal LEVEL

10.1. Introduction 161

10.2. The factory of the future 161

10.2.1. The process 161

10.2.2. The technological challenges of the plant of the future 163

10.2.3. A digital and connected factory 164

10.3. Augmented reality 165

10.3.1. Simple definition 165

10.3.2. Some chronological references for augmented reality 166

10.4. Factory of the future and augmented reality 169

10.5. Augmented reality and projection mapping 170

10.6. Future plant and projection mapping 171

10.6.1. Some preliminary considerations 171

10.6.2. Some examples of projection mapping in manufacturing 172

10.7. Conclusion 175

Chapter 11. Heritage Mediation through Projection Mapping 177
Alexandra GEORGESCU PAQUIN

11.1. Introduction 177

11.2. The symbolic value of heritage 179

11.3. Projection mapping as a means of cultural heritage mediation 180

11.3.1. Transcending mediation 181

11.3.2. Combined mediation 186

11.3.3. Self-reflective mediation 189

11.4. Conclusion: monumentalize the monumental 194

11.5. References 196

Chapter 12. Projection Mapping: A Mediation Tool for Heritage Resilience? 199
Hafida BOULEKBACHE and Douniazed CHIBANE

12.1. Introduction 199

12.2. Architecture, a heritage trace and an art to be preserved 200

12.3. The architectural heritage between preservation and mediation issues 203

12.4. Meeting between architectural heritage and projection mapping 203

12.5. Classification of architectural projection mapping 205

12.5.1. Communication issue 205

12.5.2. Information issue 208

12.6. Meeting between architecture and projection mapping 209

12.7. Conclusion 210

12.8. References 211

Chapter 13. Architectural Projection Mapping Contests: An Opportunity for Experimentation and Discovery 213
Jérémy OURY

13.1. Introduction 213

13.2. Different projection mapping projection contexts 214

13.2.1. Limitation of projection mapping orders 214

13.2.2. Contests, platforms of creative freedom 215

13.3. Interests and functioning of the contests 216

13.3.1. The organizers’ point of view 216

13.3.2. Functioning of the contests 217

13.4. Analysis of the 2018 season 220

13.4.1. Perspective of the artists 220

13.4.2. Results of the 2018 contests 223

13.5. Conclusion 226

Chapter 14. Points of View: Supporting and Highlighting Projection Mapping 229
Marine THÉBAULT and Ludovic BURCZYKOWSKI

14.1. Video Mapping European Center according to Antoine Manier 229

14.2. Lighting design and sustainable projection mapping installations according to Alain Grisval 231

14.2.1. Lighting designer 231

14.2.2. Durable devices 232

14.2.3. Economy 232

14.2.4. Legal aspect 233

14.2.5. Identity and taste 233

14.2.6. Interaction for all audiences 234

List of Authors 235

Index 237

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Daniel Schmitt Polytechnic University of Hauts-de-France, France.

Marine Thébault Polytechnic University of Hauts-de-France, France.

Ludovic Burczykowski
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