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Handbook of Web Surveys. Edition No. 2. Wiley Handbooks in Survey Methodology

  • ID: 5203774
  • Book
  • June 2021
  • 528 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd

Handbook of Web Surveys, Second Edition provides a theoretical yet practical approach to creating and conducting web surveys. This revised edition contains new and expanded topical coverage. Major new features of this edition include actualization of the context in which web surveys are taking place, consideration of new methods and results, and new sections on mobile survey and adaptive survey design. This book also includes an extended revision of coverage of web panels, R-indicators, and the framework of the survey process. The introduction contains a new description of the environment in which web surveys are administered and problems and opportunities arising from the recent trends in the digital context. Next is a thorough coverage of web surveys, followed by a chapter on a framework for steps and errors in web surveys. Sampling for web surveys is discussed, followed by coverage of errors in web surveys. Web surveys and other modes of data collection are examined.  Next is a chapter on designing a web survey questionnaire. Other topics covered include adaptive and responsive design, mixed-mode surveys, the problem of undercoverage, and weighting adjustment techniques. The book concludes with a discussion on the use of response propensities and web panels. Each chapter includes updated examples and exercises that incorporate real survey data. This book is appropriate for academics and practitioners in the fields of business, government, economics, and the social sciences who apply survey methods or construct, conduct, or analyze data from surveys in their everyday work.

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1 THE ROAD TO WEB SURVEYS 

.1. Introduction

.2.n Theory

1.2.1 Everlasting Demand for Statistical Information

1.2.2 The Dawn of Sampling Theory

1.2.3 Traditional Data Collection:

1.2.4 The Era of Computer-Assisted Interviewiing

1.2.5 The Conquest of Web

1.2.6 Toward integration of web sources or to web-multisources

1.3 Application

1.4 Summary

Key Terms

Execises

References

2.  ABOUT WEB SURVEYS 

2.1 introduction

2.2. Theory

2.2.1 Typical Survey Situation

2.2.2 Why On line Data Collection?

2.2.3 Areas of Application

2.2.4 Trends in Web Surveys

2.3 Application

  2.4 Summary

Key Terms

Execises

References

2.            A FRAMEWORK FOR STEPS AND ERRORS IN WEB SURVEYS

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Theory

3.2.1  Steps

3.2.2. Steps

3.2.3 Steps

3.2.4 Comments for an expanded framework

3.3 Application

3.4 Summary

Key Terms

Execises

References

4 SAMPLING FOR WEB SURVEYS  

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Theory

4.2.1 Target Population

4.2.2 Sampling Frames

4.2.3 Basic Concepts of Sampling

4.2.4 Simple Random Sampling

4.2.5 Determining the Sample Size

4.2.6 Some Other Sampling Designs

4.2.7 Estimation Procedures

4.3 Application

4.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

5 ERRORS IN WEB SURVEYS 

4.1 Introduction,

4.2 Theory

4.2.1 Measurement Errors

4.2.2 Nonresponse

4.3 Application

4.3.1 The Safety Monitor

4.3.2 Measurement Errors

4.3.3 Nonresponse

4.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

6 WEB SURVEYS AND OTHER MODES OF DATA COLLECTION

6.1 Introduction

6.1.1 Modes of Data Collection

6.1.2 The Choice of the Modes of Data Collection

6.2 Theory

6.2.1 Face-To-Face Surveys

6.2.2 Telephone surveys

6.2.3 Mail Surveys

6.2.4 Web surveys

6.2.5 Mobile surveys

6.3 Application

5.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

7 DESIGNING A WEB SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Theory

7.2.1 The Road Map Toward a Web Questionnaire

7.2.2 The Language of Questions

7.2.3 Basic Concepts of Visualization

7.2.4 Aswers types (response format)

7.2.5 Web Questionnaires and Paradata

7.2.6 Trends in Web Questionnaire Design and Visualization

7.3 Application

7.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

8 ADAPTIVE AND RESPONSIVE DESIGN 

8.1 Introduction,

8.2 Theory

8.2.1 Terminology and rationale

8.2.2  Quality and costs functions

8.2.3  Strategy allocation and optimization

8.3 Application

8.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References 

9 MIXED-MODE SURVEYS 

9.1 Introduction,

9.2 Theory

9.2.1 Types of Mixed Mode designs

9.2.2  Mode and device effect

9.2.3 Preventing mode effects through questionnaire design

9.2.4 Avoiding mode effects b data collection design

9.2.5 Adjusting for mode effects

9.3 Application

9.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

10 THE PROBLEM OF UNDER-COVERAGE

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Theory

10.2.1 The Internet Population

10.2.2 A Random Sample From the Internet Population

10.2.3 Reducing the Noncoverage Bias

10.2.4 Mixed-Mode Data Collection

10.3 Application

10.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

11 THE PROBLEM OF SELF-SELECTION

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Theory,

11.2.1 Basic Sampling Theory

11.2.2 A Self-Selection Sample from the Internet Population

11.2.3 Reducing the Self-Selection Bias

11.3 Application

11.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

12 WEIGHTING ADJUSTMENT TECHNIQUES 

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Theory

12.2.1 The Concept of Representativity

12.2.2 Poststratification

12.2.3 Generalized Regression Estimation

12.2.4 Raking Ratio Estimation

12.2.5 Calibration Estimation

12.2.6 Constraining the Values of Weights

12.2.7 Correction Using a Reference Survey

12.3 Application

12.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References  

13 USE OF RESPONSE PROPENSITIES

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Theory

13.2.1 A Simple Random Sample with Nonresponse

13.2.2 A Self-Selection Sample

13.2.3 The Response Propensity Definition

13.2.4 Models for Response Propensities

13.2.5 Correction Methods Based on Response Propensities

13.3 Application

13.3.1 Generation of the Population

13.3.2 Generation of Response Probabilities

13.3.3 Generation of the Sample

13.3.4 Computation of Response Propensities

13.3.5 Matching Response Propensities

13.3.6 Estimation of Population Characteristics

13.3.7 Evaluating the Results

13.3.8 Model Sensitivity

13.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References 

14 WEB PANELS 

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Theory

14.2.1 Web Panel Definition and Recruitment

14.2.2 Use of Web Panels

14.2.3 Web Panel Management

14.2.4 Response Rates

14.2.5 Representativity

14.3 Application

14.4 Summary

Key Terms

Exercises

References

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Jelke Bethlehem Statistics Netherlands.

Silvia Biffignandi
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