+353-1-416-8900REST OF WORLD
+44-20-3973-8888REST OF WORLD
1-917-300-0470EAST COAST U.S
1-800-526-8630U.S. (TOLL FREE)

PRINTER FRIENDLY

Textural Characteristics of World Foods. Edition No. 1

  • ID: 5224760
  • Book
  • February 2020
  • Region: Global
  • 424 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd

A complete guide to the textural characteristics of an international array of traditional and special foods

It is widely recognized that texture has an intrinsic relationship to food preference. A full understanding of its functions and qualities is, therefore, of crucial importance to food technologists and product developers, as well as those working towards the treatment of dysphagia. 

Textural Characteristics of World Foods is the first book to apply a detailed set of criteria and characteristics to the textures of traditional and popular foods from across the globe. Structuring chapters by region, its authors chart a journey through the textural landscapes of each continent’s cuisines, exploring the complex and symbiotic relationships that exist between texture, aroma, and taste. This innovative text:

  • Provides an overview of the textural characteristics of a wide range of foods
  • Includes descriptions of textures and key points of flavor release
  • Examines the relationships between the texture, taste, and aroma of each food presented
  • Is structured by geographic region

Rich with essential insights and important research, Textural Characteristics of World Foods offers all those working in food science and development a better picture of texture and the multifaceted role it can play.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

List of Contributors xix

Preface xxiii

Foreword xxv

Introduction

I.1 Why/How/What Do we Eat? xxvii

I.2 Terms for Texture/Taste/Aroma Related to Diverse Foods/Recipes xxviii

I.3 Universality and Diversity xxix

I.4 Wonderful Diversity of World Foods xxx

I.5 Some Pitfalls in Texture Studies xxxii

I.6 About This Book xxxiii

References xxxiv

1 Food Texture – Sensory Evaluation and Instrumental Measurement 1
Kaoru Kohyama

1.1 Introduction: History of Food Texture Studies 1

1.2 Three Methods of Texture Evaluation 3

1.3 Methodologies in Sensory Evaluation of Texture 4

1.4 Instrumental Measurements of Food Texture 6

1.5 Sound Effects 8

1.6 Visual Cues and Flavor Release 9

1.7 Concluding Remarks 9

References 10

Part I North America 15

2 Food Textures in the United States of America 17
Alina Surmacka Szczesniak

2.1 Introduction 17

2.2 Texture and the American Consumer 17

2.3 Role of Texture in Food Quality and Acceptance 18

2.4 Factors Shaping Attitudes to and Acceptance of Texture 18

2.5 Liked and Disliked Textural Characteristics 20

2.6 Textural Contrast 23

2.7 Contemporary Trends 23

References 25

3 Texture Characteristics of US Foods: Pioneers, Protocols, and Attributes ‐ Tribute to Alina 27
Gail Vance Civille, Amy Trail, Annlyse Retiveau Krogmann, and Ellen Thomas

3.1 The Protocols for Developing a Texture Lexicon 27

3.2 Texture Profiles and Evaluation Protocols for Selected US Foods 30

3.3 Potato Chip Texture Example 31

3.3.1 Serving Protocol 31

3.3.2 Tasting Protocol 31

3.3.3 Potato Chip Texture Summary 31

3.4 Bacon Texture Example 32

3.4.1 Serving Protocol 32

3.4.2 Tasting Protocol 32

3.4.3 Bacon Texture Summary 33

3.5 Peanut Butter Texture Example 34

3.5.1 Serving Protocol 34

3.5.2 Tasting Protocol 34

3.5.3 Peanut Butter Texture Summary 34

References 35

4 Textural Characteristics of Canadian Foods: Influences and Properties of Poutine Cheese and Maple Products 37
Laurie‐Eve Rioux, Veronique Perreault, and Sylvie L. Turgeon

4.1 Introduction 37

4.2 Some Historical Perspectives 37

4.3 Canadian Eating Habits 38

4.4 Poutine 39

4.4.1 History of Canadian Cheese Making 40

4.4.2 Manufacture of Cheddar Cheese 41

4.4.3 Cheddar Cheese Composition and Textural Properties 42

4.5 Maple Products 43

4.5.1 History of Making Canadian Maple Products 43

4.5.2 Manufacture of Maple Products 44

4.5.2.1 Transforming Sap into Syrup 44

4.5.2.2 Transforming Syrup into Delights of Various Textures 45

4.5.3 Maple Products Composition and Textural Properties 47

4.5.3.1 Maple Syrup 47

4.5.3.2 Maple Taffy 47

4.5.3.3 Maple Butter 47

4.5.3.4 Maple Sugar Products 48

4.5.3.5 Other Maple Products 49

4.6 Conclusion 49

References 49

Part II Middle and South America 53

5 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Mexican Foods 55
Alberto Tecante

5.1 Introduction 55

5.2 Tortillas 55

5.2.1 Corn Tortillas 56

5.2.2 Wheat Tortillas 56

5.2.3 Mechanical Tests 57

5.2.3.1 Rollability 57

5.2.3.2 Bending 59

5.2.3.3 Stress Relaxation in Uniaxial Tension 60

5.2.3.4 Tensile Strength 60

5.2.3.5 Penetration or Puncture 61

5.2.3.6 Kramer Cell 61

5.3 Alegria (Amaranth Seed Sweet) 62

5.4 Ate (Fruit Paste) 62

5.5 Pan de Muerto (Bread of the Dead) 64

5.6 Queso Cotija (Cotija Cheese) 64

5.7 Conclusions 66

References 66

6 Textural Characteristics of Brazilian Foods 69
Angelita da Silveira Moreira and Patricia Diaz de Oliveira

6.1 Formation of Food Habits in Brazil 69

6.1.1 Indigenous Influence 70

6.1.2 Portuguese Influence 70

6.1.3 African Influence 70

6.2 Main Raw Materials and Derived Foods 71

6.2.1 Cassava 71

6.2.1.1 Cassava Flours, Puba Mass, Manipueira, and Tucupi (ABIAP 2018) 72

6.2.2 Amylaceous Derivatives – Sweet Cassava Starch, Tapioca, Tapioca Flour, and Artificial Sago 75

6.2.3 Rice 76

6.2.4 Beans 78

6.3 Trends in Dietary Restrictions 82

References 83

7 Textural Characteristics and Viscoelastic Behavior of Traditional Argentinian Foods 89
Gabriel Lorenzo, Natalia Ranalli, Silvina Andres, Noemi Zaritzky, and Alicia Califano

7.1 Introduction 89

7.2 Empanadas 90

7.2.1 Viscoelastic Behavior of Commercial Wheat Dough for Empanadas 91

7.2.2 Gluten Replacement in Empanadas: A Complex Task to Cover a Larger Population 93

7.2.3 Final Remarks on Empanadas Dough 97

7.3 Dulce de Leche 98

7.3.1 Commercial Varieties of Dulce de Leche 99

7.3.2 Dulce de Leche Texture 99

7.3.3 Dulce de Leche‐like Product Enriched with Emulsified Pecan Oil 101

References 103

Part III Asia 107

8 Textural Characteristics of Japanese Foods 109
Katsuyoshi Nishinari and Tooru Ooizumi

8.1 Rice 111

8.2 Tofu 113

8.3 Gomatofu (Sesame Tofu) 114

8.4 Some Foods with Mucilaginous Texture 115

8.5 Food for Persons with Mastication Difficulty 115

8.6 Seafood in Japan 115

8.6.1 Sashimi and Marinated Products 117

8.6.2 Surimi Seafood Products 118

8.6.3 Dried Products 121

References 121

9 Textural Characteristics of Chinese Foods 125
Long Huang

9.1 Regional Cuisine/Foods in China 125

9.1.1 Shandong Cuisine (Lu Cuisine) 125

9.1.2 Canton/Guangdong Cuisine (Yue Cuisine) 125

9.1.3 Szechwan/Sichuan Cuisine (Chuan Cuisine) 126

9.1.4 Hunan Cuisine (Xiang Cuisine) 126

9.1.5 Jiangsu Cuisine (Su Cuisine) 127

9.1.6 Zhejiang Cuisine (Zhe Cuisine) 127

9.1.7 Fujian Cuisine (Min Cuisine) 127

9.1.8 Anhui Cuisine (Hui Cuisine) 127

9.1.9 Cuisines in Autonomous Regions of Tibet and Xinjiang‐Uyghur 127

9.2 Texture Descriptive Terms in Chinese 128

9.3 Textural Characteristics of Typical Chinese Foods 128

9.3.1 Crust of Mooncake (Yue Bing, Geppei) 128

9.3.2 Chinese Dumpling (Jiaozi, Gyoza, Shao‐Mai, Shumai) 130

9.3.3 Texture Modification to Flour‐Based Chinese Foods, Especially Noodle and Glutinous Dumpling 133

References 136

10 Textural Characteristics of Indonesian Foods 137
Oni Yuliarti

10.1 Geographical 137

10.2 Characteristic of Indonesian Diets 138

10.3 Textural Properties of Indonesian Foods 139

10.3.1 Gel‐Like Foods – Green Jelly Leaves 139

10.3.1.1 Botanical 139

10.3.1.2 Rheological Properties of the Gel 140

10.3.1.3 The Production of the Gel 143

10.3.2 Gel‐Like Foods – Seaweeds 143

10.3.2.1 Botanical 143

10.3.2.2 Gelation and Rheology of Pudding Rumput Laut 144

10.3.2.3 Production of Pudding Rumput Laut 146

10.3.3 Soy‐Based Foods – Tempeh (Fermented Soybeans) 146

10.3.3.1 Texture Properties of Tempeh 148

References 149

11 Textural Characteristics of Thai Foods 151
Rungnaphar Pongsawatmanit

11.1 Introduction 151

11.2 Historical and Geographical Background of Thai Food 152

11.3 Selected Food Samples with Sensory Evaluation and Instrumental Measurement 156

11.4 Health Benefit of Thai Food 160

References 163

12 Textural Characteristics of Malaysian Foods: Quality and Stability of Malaysian Laksa Noodles 167
Lai Hoong Cheng, Yan Kitt Low, A’firah Mohd Sakri, Jia Shin Tai, and Abd Karim Alias

12.1 Introduction 167

12.2 Chemical Composition 168

12.3 Organoleptic Quality 168

12.4 Textural Quality 169

12.5 Factors Affecting Textural Quality of Laksa Noodles 170

12.5.1 Rice Grain 175

12.5.2 Aged Rice 175

12.5.3 Milling Method 175

12.5.4 Particle Size of Rice Flour 175

12.5.5 Steaming Process 176

12.5.6 Blending of Other Starch/Starches 176

12.5.7 Extrusion and Boiling 176

12.5.8 Washing 176

12.6 Storage Stability 176

12.7 Nutritional Quality 178

12.7.1 Gluten Free 178

12.7.2 Low‐Fat Carbohydrate Choice 178

12.8 Conclusion 178

Acknowledgments 178

References 179

Part IV Oceania 181

13 Textural Characteristics of Australian Foods 183
Andrew Halmos, Lita Katopo, and Stefan Kasapis

13.1 Introduction 183

13.2 Importance of Mouthfeel and Its Recognition 184

13.3 Developments in Mouthfeel and Texture Terms 184

13.4 Typical Meals with Descriptors for the Australian Palate 185

13.5 Breakfast 186

13.5.1 Toasted Bread 186

13.5.2 Cereals with Milk 186

13.5.3 Coffee 187

13.5.4 Fried Tomatoes 188

13.5.5 Steak, Sausages, or Chops 188

13.5.6 Eggs 188

13.5.7 Bacon 188

13.5.8 Spreads 188

13.6 Lunch or Mid‐Day Meal 189

13.6.1 Sandwiches with Fillings 189

13.6.2 Pie, Sausage Roll, or Pastry 189

13.6.3 Potato Products 189

13.6.4 Boiled or Steamed Vegetables 189

13.6.5 Vegetables with Roux 189

13.6.6 Salads and Dressings 190

13.6.7 Meat 190

13.7 Dinner 190

13.7.1 Soup 190

13.7.2 Meat in the Form of Chops or Steak 190

13.7.3 Seafood 190

13.7.4 Fish 191

13.7.5 Rice 191

13.7.6 Vegetables 191

13.7.7 Chinese‐Style Food 191

13.7.8 Cheeses 192

13.7.9 Sweets 192

13.7.10 Ice Cream 193

13.7.11 Snacks 193

13.8 Conclusions 193

References 193

Part V Central Asia Middle East 197

14 Textural Characteristics of Indian Foods: A Comparative Analysis 199
Amardeep Singh Virdi and Narpinder Singh

14.1 Introduction 199

14.2 Chapati 201

14.3 Gluten‐Free Chapatis 205

14.4 Biscuits and Cookies 205

14.5 Gluten‐Free Cookies and Biscuits 207

14.6 Noodles 208

14.7 Gluten‐Free Noodles 210

14.8 Bread 211

14.9 Gluten‐Free Bread 212

14.10 Muffins and Cakes 213

14.11 Gluten‐Free Muffins and Cakes 214

14.12 Conclusion 215

Acknowledgments 216

References 216

15 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Turkish Foods 223
Mahmut Doğan, Duygu Aslan, and Fatima Tahseen Miano

15.1 Introduction 223

15.2 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Turkish Meat‐Based Food Products 224

15.2.1 Sucuk (Turkish‐Type Fermented Sausage) 224

15.2.2 Pastırma (A Traditional Dry‐Cured Meat Product) 225

15.3 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Turkish Cheeses 227

15.4 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Turkish Desserts 231

15.4.1 Turkish Delight (Lokum) 231

15.4.2 Helva 232

References 234

16 Textural Characteristics of Iranian Foods: Cuisine Signifies Old Historical Identities 237
Bahareh Emadzadeh and Behrouz Ghorani

16.1 Iran Geography at a Glance 237

16.2 The Impact of Geography and History 237

16.3 Distinctive Features of Persian Cuisine 239

16.4 Bread 239

16.4.1 Sangak 240

16.4.2 Barbari 240

16.4.3 Taftoon 241

16.4.4 Lavash 241

16.5 Rice 242

16.5.1 Rice‐Based Foods 242

16.5.2 Rice Cooking 242

16.5.2.1 Stewing of Rice by Steam 243

16.5.3 Rice‐Based Sweets and Desserts 243

16.6 Kebabs 243

16.7 Lighvan Cheese 244

16.8 Gaz: A Well‐Known Confectionary 245

16.9 Doogh: A Fermented Dairy‐Based Drink 246

16.10 Conclusion 246

References 247

Part VI Russia 251

17 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Russian Foods 253
Nataliia Ptichkina and Nataliia Nepovinnykh

17.1 Introduction 253

17.2 Formation History of Russian Cuisine 253

17.3 Textural Characteristics of Some Traditional Products 255

17.4 Bread from Rye Flour 255

17.5 Jellies from Meat and from Fish (Kholodets) 257

17.6 Soup‐Puree Based on Pumpkin Powder 258

17.7 Sauces 259

17.8 Curd Cheese Dishes 261

17.9 Kissels and Jellied Desserts 262

17.10 Aerated Desserts 263

Acknowledgments 265

References 265

Part VII Europe 269

18 Textural Characteristics of Italian Foods 271
Rossella Di Monaco, Nicoletta Antonella Miele, Sharon Puleo, Paolo Masi, and Silvana Cavella

18.1 Introduction 271

18.2 Cheese 271

18.2.1 Pasta Filata Cheese 274

18.2.2 Cooked Curd Cheeses 275

18.2.3 Other Italian Cheeses 277

18.3 Salumi 277

18.3.1 Italian Dry‐Cured Ham 278

18.3.2 Salami 281

18.3.3 Mortadella 282

18.4 Bread 282

18.5 Conclusions 285

References 286

19 Textural Characteristics of Greek Foods 293
Stefan Kasapis

19.1 Background 293

19.1.1 Olive Oil 293

19.2 Traditional Greek Cheeses 296

19.2.1 Feta 297

19.3 Health Conscious Feta Manufacturing 298

19.3.1 Texture Profile Analysis of Feta 298

19.3.2 Full and Low Fat Greek Yogurts 299

19.4 Popular Emulsion‐Type Meat Products 300

19.5 Conclusions 301

References 301

20 Textural Characteristics of British Foods 305
Andrew J. Rosenthal and Tim J. Foster

20.1 Introduction – What Are British Foods? 305

20.2 Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding 306

20.2.1 Culinary Background to the Dish 306

20.2.2 Nature of the Raw Materials 306

20.2.3 Textural Considerations 307

20.3 Fish and Chips 307

20.3.1 Culinary Background to the Dish 307

20.3.2 Nature of the Raw Materials 308

20.3.3 Textural Considerations 309

20.4 Conclusions 310

References 311

21 Textural Characteristics of Traditional French Foods 313
Bernard Launay

21.1 Introduction 313

21.2 Change in Texture Awareness: What and Why? 314

21.2.1 The “New Cuisine” Style 314

21.2.2 Restaurants of Foreign Cuisine 314

21.2.3 Fast‐Food Restaurants 314

21.2.4 Changes Attributable to the Development of Industrial Food Products 315

21.2.5 Texture Measurement in Industry and Research Labs 315

Acknowledgment 318

References 318

22 Textural Characteristics of Spanish Foods: Dry‐Cured Ham 319
Susana Fiszman and Amparo Tarrega

22.1 Introduction 319

22.2 Production of Dry‐Cured Ham 320

22.2.1 Salting/Post‐Salting 320

22.2.2 Ripening 321

22.3 Sensory Quality of Dry‐Cured Ham 321

22.4 Sensory Assessment of Dry‐Cured Ham 322

22.4.1 Texture Attributes 323

22.4.2 Appearance Attributes 324

22.4.2.1 Color 324

22.4.2.2 Odor and Flavor Attributes 325

22.4.3 Other Sensory Techniques 325

22.4.4 Factors Affecting the Sensory Features of Dry‐Cured Ham 325

22.5 Instrumental Texture Techniques for Dry‐Cured Ham 326

22.5.1 Instrumental TPA 326

22.5.2 Warner‐Bratzler Test 327

22.5.3 Other Instrumental Methods for Measuring Texture Features 327

22.6 Instrumental Methods for Determining Sensory Features Other than Texture 328

22.7 Health‐Related Aspects of Dry‐Cured Ham 328

22.8 Final Remarks 330

Acknowledgments 330

References 330

23 Textural Characteristics of German Foods: The German Wurstchen 335
Norbert Raak, Klaus Durrschmid, and Harald Rohm

23.1 Introduction 335

23.2 Basic Technologies of Sausage Manufacture 336

23.2.1 Rohwurst 336

23.2.2 Bruhwurst 337

23.2.3 Kochwurst 337

23.3 Sausage‐Related Culture, Stories, and Recent Trends 337

23.4 Evaluation of Texture and Rheological Properties of Sausages 342

23.5 Typical Sausage Side Dishes and Condiments 346

References 348

24 Textural Characteristics of Traditional Finnish Foods 353
Liisa Lahteenmaki and Karin Autio

24.1 Introduction 353

24.2 Rye Bread 354

24.2.1 Sensory Attributes 354

24.2.2 Textural Measurements 354

24.2.3 The Effect of Ingredients and Processing Conditions on Structural Properties 356

24.3 Oat β‐Glucan 356

24.3.1 Sensory Attributes 356

24.3.2 Rheological Properties 357

References 358

Part VIII Africa 361

25 Textural Characteristics of Nigerian Foods 363
Matthew Olusola Oluwamukomi and Olaide Samuel Lawal

25.1 Introduction 363

25.2 Classification of Foods Based on Their Rheological/Textural Characteristics 364

25.3 Foods That Flow and Do Not Require Any Chewing During Oral Processing (Newtonian and Non‐Newtonian Fluids) 364

25.3.1 Newtonian Fluids 364

25.3.1.1 Palm Wine 365

25.3.1.2 Pito 365

25.3.1.3 Kunun from Cereal 365

25.3.1.4 Nunu from Milk 365

25.3.1.5 Otika 366

25.3.1.6 Burukutu 366

25.3.2 Non‐Newtonian Fluids 366

25.3.2.1 Ketchup 366

25.3.2.2 Draw Soups: (Ogbono, okra, ewedu) 366

25.4 Semisolid Foods That Are Processed in the Mouth by Squeezing the Tongue and Palate 367

25.4.1 Pasting Properties of Starch Pastes (Ogi, Tuwo, Amala, Lafun, or Pupuru) 367

25.4.1.1 Ogi/Akamu Porridge/Agidi from Maize 369

25.4.1.2 Tuwo from Maize 370

25.4.1.3 Gari / Eba from Cassava 370

25.4.1.4 Pounded Yam (iyan) or Yam Fufu from Yam 372

25.4.1.5 Amala (Amala isu) from Yam 372

25.5 Soft‐Solid Foods That Require Chewing but Do Not Have “Crispy”Attributes 373

25.5.1 Akara from Cowpeas 373

25.5.2 Warankasi from Milk 375

25.6 Hard‐Solid Foods Are Crispy and Associated with a Crunchiness 375

25.6.1 Ipekere Agbado (Maize Fritters) 376

25.6.2 Maize Kokoro 376

25.7 Conclusion 377

References 377

Index 385

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Katsuyoshi Nishinari
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll