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The Ethics Toolkit. A Compendium of Ethical Concepts and Methods. Edition No. 1

  • ID: 5226659
  • Book
  • August 2007
  • 276 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The Ethics Toolkit provides an accessible and engaging compendium of concepts, theories, and strategies that encourage students and advanced readers to think critically about ethics so that they can engage intelligently in ethical study, thought, and debate.
  • Written by the authors of the popular The Philosophers’ Toolkit (Blackwell, 2001); Baggini is also a renowned print and broadcast journalist, and a prolific author of popular philosophy books
  • Uses clear and accessible language appropriate for use both inside and beyond the classroom
  • Enlivened through the use of real-world and hypothetical examples
  • Cross-referencing of entries helps to connect and contrast ideas
  • Features lists of prominent ethics organizations and useful websites
  • Encourages readers to think critically about ethics and teaches them how to engage intelligently in ethical study, thought, and debate
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Acknowledgements.

INTRODUCTION.

I The Grounds of Ethics.

1.1 Aesthetics.

1.2 Agency.

1.3 Authority.

1.4 Autonomy.

1.5 Care.

1.6 Character.

1.7 Conscience.

1.8 Evolution.

1.9 Finitude.

1.10 Flourishing.

1.11 Harmony.

1.12 Interest.

1.13 Intuition.

1.14 Merit.

1.15 Natural Law.

1.16 Need.

1.17 Pain and pleasure.

1.18 Revelation.

1.19 Rights.

1.20 Sympathy.

1.21 Tradition and history.

II Frameworks for Ethics.

2.1 Consequentialism.

2.2 Contractarianism.

2.3 Cultural critique.

2.4 Deontological ethics.

2.5 Discourse Ethics.

2.6 Divine command.

2.7 Egoism.

2.8 Hedonism.

2.9 Naturalism.

2.10 Particularism.

2.11 Perfectionism.

2.12 Pragmatism.

2.13 Rationalism.

2.14 Relativism.

2.15 Subjectivism.

2.16 Virtue ethics.

III Central Concepts in Ethics.

3.1 Absolute/Relative.

3.2 Act/Rule.

3.3 Bad/evil.

3.4 Beneficence/non-maleficence.

3.5 Cause/reason.

3.6 Cognitivism/non-cognitivism.

3.7 Commission/omission.

3.8 Consent.

3.9 Facts/values.

3.10 The Golden Mean.

3.11 Honour/shame.

3.12 Individual/collective.

3.13 Injury.

3.14 Intentions/consequences.

3.15 Internalism/externalism.

3.16 Intrinsic/instrumental Value.

3.17 Legal/moral.

3.18 Liberation/oppression.

3.19 Means/ends.

3.20 Metaethics/normative ethics.

3.21 Moral subjects/moral agents.

3.22 Prudence.

3.23 Public and private.

3.24 Stoic cosmopolitanism.

IV Assessment, Judgement & Critique.

4.1 Alienation.

4.2 Authenticity.

4.3 Consistency.

4.4 Counterexamples.

4.5 Fairness.

4.6 Fallacies.

4.7 Impartiality and Objectivity.

4.8 The ‘is/ought’ gap.

4.9 Justice and lawfulness.

4.10 Just war theory.

4.11 Paternalism.

4.12 Proportionality.

4.13 Reflective equilibrium.

4.14 Restoration.

4.15 Sex and gender.

4.16 Speciesism.

4.17 Thought Experiments.

4.18 Universalisability.

V The Limits of Ethics.

5.1 Akrasia.

5.2 Amoralism.

5.3 Bad faith and self-deception.

5.4 Casuistry and Rationalisation.

5.5 Fallenness.

5.6 False consciousness.

5.7 Free Will and Determinism.

5.8 Moral Luck.

5.9 Nihilism.

5.10 Pluralism.

5.11 Power.

5.12 Radical particularity.

5.13 Scepticism.

5.14 The Separateness of Persons.

5.15 Standpoint.

5.16 Supererogation.

5.17 Tragedy

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Peter S. Fosl Transylvania University, USA.

Julian Baggini The Philosophers' Magazine.
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