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The Global Market for Biocomposites 2023-2033

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    Report

  • 355 Pages
  • March 2023
  • Region: Global
  • Future Markets, Inc
  • ID: 5647970

Biobased composites (Biocomposites) are generally referred to as composites with either reinforcement or matrix derived from natural sources, or encompassing both (full biocomposites). Biocomposites  are produced from naturally-renewable and abundant precursor feedstocks, and possess properties equivalent, on a weight basis, to their synthetic counterparts.Issues with recycling and the underlying environmental concerns regarding synthetic based composites is driving growing interest in biocomposites. 

The most commonly used types of biocomposites are Wood-Plastic Composites (WPC) and Natural Fibre Composites (NFC). Natural and wood fibers are combined with petrochemical or bio-based polymers to achieve enhanced mechanical and lightweight properties. Thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers are also increasingly being developed from bio-based chemicals and natural materials such as mycelium and alginate. 

Report includes:

  • In-depth analysis of the global biocomposites market
  • Global biocomposites market trends and drivers
  • Market demand  for biocomposites, by end user market, forecast to 2033
  • Market segmentation and applications analysis. Markets covered include:
    • Rigid Packaging
    • Flexible Packaging
    • Automotive
    • Building & Construction
    • Electronics
    • Aerospace
    • Sports & Leisure Equipment
  • Advantages of biocomposites over synthetic composites
  • Profiles of 181 companies in biocomposites. Companies profiled include Cruz Foam, Ecovative Design LLC, Bcomp Ltd., Ecovative, INCA Renewtech,,  Lingrove, Inc., MOGU S.r.l., Natural Fiber Welding, Inc., Norwegian Mycelium AS (NoMy), OrganoClick, Plafco Fibertech and Seevix Material Sciences Ltd. 


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Table of Contents

1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1 Synthetic and bio-based composites
1.2 Wood and natural fiber biocomposites
1.3 Market trends and drivers
1.4 Markets and applications for biocomposites
1.5 Global production capacities of biobased and sustainable plastics
1.6 Global market demand 2019-2033
1.7 Challenges for biocomposites

2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3 BIOCOMPOSITE MATERIALS
3.1 Natural Fibers
3.1.1 Plant
3.1.2 Animal
3.1.3 Mineral
3.2 Matrices
3.2.1 Thermoplastic polymers
3.2.2 Thermosetting polymers

4 BIO-BASED POLYMERS AND RESINS
4.1 Polyamides (Bio-PA)
4.1.1 Market analysis
4.1.2 Polyamide biocomposites
4.1.3 Producers and production capacities
4.2 Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (Bio-PBAT)- Aliphatic aromatic copolyesters
4.2.1 Market analysis
4.2.2 PBAT biocomposites
4.2.3 Producers and production capacities
4.3 Polybutylene succinate (PBS) and copolymers
4.3.1 Market analysis
4.3.2 Poly(Butylene Succinate) biocomposites
4.3.3 Producers and production capacities
4.4 Polyethylene (Bio-PE)
4.4.1 Market analysis
4.4.2 Bio-Polyethylene biocomposites
4.4.3 Producers and production capacities
4.5 Polypropylene (Bio-PP)
4.5.1 Market analysis
4.5.2 Bio-Polypropylene biocomposites
4.5.3 Producers and production capacities
4.6 Polylactic acid (Bio-PLA)
4.6.1 Market analysis
4.6.2 Polylactic Acid (PLA) Biocomposites
4.6.3 Producers and production capacities, current and planned
4.6.3.1 Lactic acid producers and production capacities
4.6.3.2 PLA producers and production capacities
4.7 Lignin
4.7.1 Lignin structure
4.7.2 Types of lignin
4.7.2.1 Sulfur containing lignin
4.7.2.2 Sulfur-free lignin from biorefinery process
4.7.3 Properties
4.7.4 Phenol and phenolic resins
4.7.5 Lignin composites
4.7.6 Automotive composites
4.8 Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC)
4.8.1 Market analysis
4.8.2 Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) biocomposites
4.8.3 Producers
4.9 Cellulose nanocrystals
4.9.1 Market analysis
4.9.2 Cellulose nanocrystals biocomposites
4.9.3 Producers
4.10 Cellulose nanofibers
4.10.1 Market analysis
4.10.2 Cellulose nanofibers biocomposites
4.10.2.1 Construction composites
4.10.2.2 Automotive composites
4.10.2.3 Aerospace composites
4.10.3 Producers
4.11 Bacterial Nanocellulose, Biocellulose (BNC)
4.11.1 Properties
4.11.2 BNC biocomposites
4.12 Starch
4.12.1 Thermoplastic starch (TPS) biocomposites
4.12.2 Producers
4.13 Mycelium
4.13.1 Mycelium biocomposites
4.14 Chitosan
4.14.1 Chitosan biocomposites
4.15 Alginate
4.15.1 Alginate biocomposites
4.16 Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA)
4.16.1 Technology description
4.16.2 Types
4.16.2.1 PHB
4.16.2.2 PHBV
4.16.3 Synthesis and production processes
4.16.4 Market analysis
4.16.5 Commercially available PHAs
4.16.6 Producers and production capacities
4.16.7 PHA biocomposites

5 NATURAL FIBER BIOCOMPOSITE MATERIALS
5.1 Manufacturing method, matrix materials and applications of natural fibers
5.2 Advantages of natural fibers
5.3 Chemical Treatment of Natural Fibers
5.4 Plants (cellulose, lignocellulose)
5.4.1 Seed fibers
5.4.1.1 Luffa
5.4.1.2 Banana
5.4.1.3 Bast fibers
5.4.1.4 Hemp
5.4.1.5 Flax
5.4.1.6 Kenaf
5.4.2 Leaf fibers
5.4.2.1 Sisal
5.4.2.2 Abaca
5.4.3 Fruit fibers
5.4.3.1 Coir
5.4.3.2 Pineapple
5.4.4 Stalk fibers from agricultural residues
5.4.4.1 Rice fiber
5.4.4.2 Corn
5.4.5 Cane, grasses and reed
5.4.5.1 Switch grass
5.4.5.2 Sugarcane (agricultural residues)
5.4.5.3 Bamboo
5.4.5.4 Fresh grass (green biorefinery)

6 BIOCOMPOSITE MARKETS
6.1 Natural Fiber Composites
6.1.1 Applications
6.1.2 Natural fiber injection moulding compounds
6.1.2.1 Properties
6.1.2.2 Applications
6.1.3 Non-woven natural fiber mat composites
6.1.3.1 Automotive
6.1.3.2 Applications
6.1.4 Aligned natural fiber-reinforced composites
6.1.5 Natural fiber biobased polymer compounds
6.1.6 Natural fiber biobased polymer non-woven mats
6.1.6.1 Flax
6.1.6.2 Kenaf
6.1.7 Natural fiber thermoset bioresin composites
6.2 Packaging
6.2.1 Flexible packaging
6.2.1.1 Market overview
6.2.1.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.2.2 Rigid packaging
6.2.2.1 Market overview
6.2.2.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.3 Automotive
6.3.1 Market overview
6.3.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.4 Building & construction
6.4.1 Market overview
6.4.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.5 Electronics
6.5.1 Market overview
6.5.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.6 Aerospace
6.6.1 Market overview
6.6.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.7 Sports and leisure equipment
6.7.1 Market overview
6.7.2 Global market demand 2019-2033
6.8 Biomedicine
6.8.1 Market overview

7 COMPANY PROFILES (181 company profiles)

8 REFERENCES

List of Tables
Table 1. Mechanical properties of natural and synthetic fibers.
Table 2. Types of natural fibers, properties and applications.
Table 3. Market trends in biocomposites.
Table 4. Markets and applications for biocomposites.
Table 5. Challenges for biocomposites.
Table 6. Mechanical properties of natural and man-made fibers.
Table 7. Properties of bio-based and synthetic resin systems.
Table 8. Properties of polymer matrices.
Table 9. Bio-based polyamides (Bio-PA) market analysis - manufacture, advantages, disadvantages and applications.
Table 10. Leading Bio-PA producers production capacities.
Table 11. Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) market analysis- manufacture, advantages, disadvantages and applications.
Table 12. Leading PBAT producers, production capacities and brands.
Table 13. Bio-PBS market analysis-manufacture, advantages, disadvantages and applications.
Table 14. Leading PBS producers and production capacities.
Table 15. Bio-based Polyethylene (Bio-PE) market analysis- manufacture, advantages, disadvantages and applications.
Table 16. Leading Bio-PE producers.
Table 17. Bio-PP market analysis- manufacture, advantages, disadvantages and applications.
Table 18. Leading Bio-PP producers and capacities.
Table 19. Polylactic acid (PLA) market analysis-manufacture, advantages, disadvantages and applications.
Table 20. Lactic acid producers and production capacities.
Table 21. PLA producers and production capacities.
Table 22. Application of lignin in composites.
Table 23. Technical lignin types and applications.
Table 24. Classification of technical lignins.
Table 25. Lignin content of selected biomass.
Table 26. Properties of lignins and their applications.
Table 27. Example markets and applications for lignin.
Table 28. Lignin as filler in lignin-based biocomposites.
Table 29. Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) market analysis.
Table 30. Market overview for cellulose microfibers (microfibrillated cellulose) in composites-market age, key benefits, applications and producers.
Table 31. Microfibrillated Cellulose (MFC) production capacities in metric tons and production process, by producer, metric tons.
Table 32. Cellulose nanocrystals analysis.
Table 33. CNC properties.
Table 34. Mechanical properties of CNC and other reinforcement materials.
Table 35. Applications of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC).
Table 36. Cellulose nanocrystal production capacities and production process, by producer.
Table 37. Cellulose nanofibers market analysis.
Table 38. Comparative properties of polymer composites reinforcing materials.
Table 39. Market assessment for cellulose nanofibers in composites-application, key benefits and motivation for use, megatrends, market drivers, technology drawbacks, competing materials, material loading, main global composites OEMs.
Table 40. Market assessment for cellulose nanofibers in construction composites-application, key benefits and motivation for use, megatrends, market drivers, technology drawbacks, competing materials, material loading, main global construction OEMs
Table 41. Market assessment for cellulose nanofibers in automotive composites-application, key benefits and motivation for use, megatrends, market drivers, technology drawbacks, competing materials, material loading, main global automotive OEMs.
Table 42. Market assessment for cellulose nanofibers in aerospace composites-application, key benefits and motivation for use, megatrends, market drivers, technology drawbacks, competing materials, material loading.
Table 43. CNF production capacities and production process, by producer, in metric tons.
Table 44. Starch-based bioplastic producers.
Table 45. Overview of mycelium fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 46. Overview of chitosan fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 47. Overview of alginate-description, properties, application and market size.
Table 48.Types of PHAs and properties.
Table 49. Comparison of the physical properties of different PHAs with conventional petroleum-based polymers.
Table 50. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) extraction methods.
Table 51. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) market analysis.
Table 52. Commercially available PHAs.
Table 53. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) producers.
Table 54. Markets and applications for PHAs.
Table 55. Applications, advantages and disadvantages of PHAs in packaging.
Table 56. Application, manufacturing method, and matrix materials of natural fibers.
Table 57. Advantages and disadvantages of natural and glass fibers through life cycle stages: cradle, gate, use, grave.
Table 58. Typical properties of natural fibers.
Table 59. Overview of luffa fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 60. Overview of banana fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 61. Overview of hemp fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 62. Overview of flax fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 63. Overview of kenaf fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 64. Overview of sisal fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 65. Overview of abaca fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 66. Overview of coir fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 67. Overview of pineapple fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 68. Overview of rice fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 69. Overview of corn fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 70. Overview of switch grass fibers-description, properties and applications.
Table 71. Overview of sugarcane fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and application and market size.
Table 72. Overview of bamboo fibers-description, properties, drawbacks and applications.
Table 73. Applications of natural fiber composites.
Table 74. Typical properties of short natural fiber-thermoplastic composites.
Table 75. Properties of non-woven natural fiber mat composites.
Table 76. Properties of aligned natural fiber composites.
Table 77. Properties of natural fiber-bio-based polymer compounds.
Table 78. Properties of natural fiber-bio-based polymer non-woven mats.
Table 79. Comparison of bioplastics’ (PLA and PHAs) properties to other common polymers used in product packaging.
Table 80. Typical applications for bioplastics in flexible packaging.
Table 81. Typical applications for bioplastics in rigid packaging.
Table 82. Biocomposites in the automotive sector- market drivers, applications and challenges for NF use.
Table 83. Biocomposites in the automotive market, by manufacturer.
Table 84. Applications of natural fibers in the automotive industry.
Table 85. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composite in the automotive market.
Table 86. Biocomposites in the building/construction sector- market drivers, applications and challenges for NF use.
Table 87. Applications of natural fibers in the building/construction sector.
Table 88. Biocomposites in the aerospace sector-market drivers, applications and challenges for NF use.
Table 89. Biocomposites in the sports and leisure sector-market drivers, applications and challenges for NF use.
Table 90. Granbio Nanocellulose Processes.
Table 91. Lactips plastic pellets.
Table 92. Oji Holdings CNF products.

List of Figures
Figure 1. NOTOX Nshape Pro board constructed with EPS foam, flax and bio-epoxy resin.
Figure 2. Classification of biocomposites.
Figure 3. Greenboats FLAX27 daysailer constructed with ampliTexTM flax fibres and bio-based resin system.
Figure 4. Flax composite satellite panel.23
Figure 5. Global production capacities of biobased and sustainable plastics in 2019-2033, by type, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 6. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, by market, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 7. High purity lignin.
Figure 8. Lignocellulose architecture.
Figure 9. Extraction processes to separate lignin from lignocellulosic biomass and corresponding technical lignins.
Figure 10. Schematic of WISA plywood home.
Figure 11. SEM image of microfibrillated cellulose.
Figure 12. TEM image of cellulose nanocrystals.
Figure 13. CNC slurry.
Figure 14. Interior of NCV concept car.
Figure 15. Typical structure of mycelium-based foam.
Figure 16. Commercial mycelium composite construction materials.
Figure 17. BLOOM masterbatch from Algix.
Figure 18. PHA family.
Figure 19. Types of natural fibers.
Figure 20. Composite constituents of NFRCs.
Figure 21. Luffa cylindrica fiber.
Figure 22. Pineapple fiber.
Figure 23. Full natural fibre bodywork kit on Porsche Cayman 718 GT4 CS MR.
Figure 24. Hemp fibers combined with PP in car door panel.
Figure 25. Notpla water bottle.
Figure 26. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in flexible packaging, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 27. Sulupac packaging.
Figure 28. Shellworks packaging.
Figure 29. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in rigid packaging, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 30. Car door produced from Hemp fiber.
Figure 31. Natural fiber composites in the BMW M4 GT4 racing car.
Figure 32. Mercedes-Benz components containing natural fibers.
Figure 33. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in automotive, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 34. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in building and construction, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 35. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in electronics, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 36. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in aerospace, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 37. Lonely Mountain natural fiber snowboard.
Figure 38. Global market demand for biocomposites 2019-2033, in sports & leisure equipment, in 1,000 tons.
Figure 39. ANDRITZ Lignin Recovery process.
Figure 40: Anpoly cellulose nanofiber hydrogel.
Figure 41. MEDICELLU™.
Figure 42: Ashai Kasei CNF production process.
Figure 43: Asahi Kasei CNF fabric sheet.
Figure 44: Properties of Asahi Kasei cellulose nanofiber nonwoven fabric.
Figure 45. CNF nonwoven fabric.
Figure 46. Bio-PA rear bumper stay.
Figure 47: R3TM process technology.
Figure 48: Blue Goose CNC Production Process.
Figure 49: Celluforce production process.
Figure 50: NCCTM Process.
Figure 51: CNC produced at Tech Futures’ pilot plant; cloudy suspension (1 wt.%), gel-like (10 wt.%), flake-like crystals, and very fine powder. Product advantages include:
Figure 52. Cellufoam™.
Figure 53. nanoforest-S.
Figure 54. nanoforest-PDP.
Figure 55. nanoforest-MB.
Figure 56. ELLEX products.
Figure 57. CNF-reinforced PP compounds.
Figure 58. Kirekira! toilet wipes.
Figure 59. DIC Products CNF production process.
Figure 60. Mushroom leather.
Figure 61. Photograph (a) and micrograph (b) of mineral/MFC composite showing the high viscosity and fibrillar structure.
Figure 62. TMP-Bio Process.
Figure 63. Cellulose Nanofiber (CNF) composite with polyethylene (PE).
Figure 64: CNF products from Furukawa Electric.
Figure 65. Cutlery samples (spoon, knife, fork) made of nano cellulose and biodegradable plastic composite materials.
Figure 66. Non-aqueous CNF dispersion "Senaf" (Photo shows 5% of plasticizer).
Figure 67. CNF gel.
Figure 68. Block nanocellulose material.
Figure 69. CNF products developed by Hokuetsu.
Figure 70. Dual Graft System.
Figure 71: Engine cover utilizing Kao CNF composite resins.
Figure 72. Acrylic resin blended with modified CNF (fluid) and its molded product (transparent film), and image obtained with AFM (CNF 10wt% blended).
Figure 73. IPA synthesis method.
Figure 74. MOGU-Wave panels.
Figure 75. Reishi.
Figure 76. Nippon Paper Industries’ adult diapers.
Figure 77. CNF clear sheets.
Figure 78. Oji Holdings CNF polycarbonate product.
Figure 79. A vacuum cleaner part made of cellulose fiber (left) and the assembled vacuum cleaner.
Figure 80. XCNF.
Figure 81: Plantrose process.
Figure 82. Innventia CNF production process.
Figure 83: Innventia AB movable nanocellulose demo plant.
Figure 84. Manufacturing process for STARCEL.
Figure 85. CNF dispersion and powder from Starlite.
Figure 86. Sugino Machine CNF production process.
Figure 87. High Pressure Water Jet Process.
Figure 88. 2 wt.% CNF suspension.
Figure 89. BiNFi-s Dry Powder.
Figure 90. BiNFi-s Dry Powder and Propylene (PP) Complex Pellet.
Figure 91. Silk nanofiber (right) and cocoon of raw material.
Figure 92. Sulapac cosmetics containers.
Figure 93. Sulzer equipment for PLA polymerization processing.
Figure 94. Teijin bioplastic film for door handles.
Figure 95. Silver/CNF composite dispersions.
Figure 96. CNF/nanosilver powder.
Figure 97. Corbion FDCA production process.
Figure 98: CNF resin products.
Figure 99. UPM biorefinery process.
Figure 100. HefCel-coated wood (left) and untreated wood (right) after 30 seconds flame test.
Figure 101. Bio-based barrier bags prepared from Tempo-CNF coated bio-HDPE film.

Companies Mentioned

A selection of companies mentioned in this report includes:

  • 9Fiber, Inc.
  • ADBIOplastics S.L.
  • AGRANA Staerke GmbH
  • AKRO-PLASTIC GmbH
  • Alberta Innovates/Innotech Materials LLC
  • Algix LLC
  • AMSilk GmbH
  • Andritz AG
  • Anellotech, Inc.
  • Anomera, Inc.
  • ANPOLY, Inc.
  • Applied Bioplastics
  • Aquapak Polymers Ltd
  • Archer Daniel Midland Company (ADM)
  • Arctic Biomaterials Oy
  • Arkema S.A
  • Arrow Greentech
  • Asahi Kasei Corporation
  • Attis Innovations, llc
  • Avantium B.V.
  • Axcelon Biopolymers Corporation
  • Bambooder Biobased Fibers B.V.
  • BASF SE
  • Bcomp ltd.
  • BENVIC SAS
  • Beologic
  • Bio Fab NZ
  • BIO-FED
  • Biofiber GmbH
  • Biofiber Tech Sweden AB
  • Biokemik
  • BioLogiQ, Inc.
  • Biome Bioplastics
  • BIOTEC Biologische NaturverpackungenGmbH & Co.
  • BlockTexx Pty Ltd.
  • Blue Goose Biorefineries (BGB) Inc.
  • Bluepha Beijing Lanjing Microbiology Technology Co., Ltd.
  • Borealis AG
  • Borregaard Chemcell
  • B-PREG
  • Cardia Bioplastics Ltd.
  • Cardolite
  • Ceapro, Inc.
  • CELLiCON B.V.
  • Cellucomp Ltd
  • Celluforce, Inc
  • Cellutech AB (Stora Enso)
  • Checkerspot, Inc.
  • Chuetsu Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
  • Clariant AG
  • Coastgrass ApS
  • COMPANY PROFILES
  • Cruz Foam
  • Daicel Polymer Ltd.
  • Daio Paper Corporation
  • Danimer Scientific LLC
  • DIC
  • Dongnam Realize Inc.
  • DuPont
  • Eastman Chemical Ltd. Corporation
  • Ecotechnilin
  • Ecovative Design LLC
  • Eranova
  • Evonik Industries AG
  • Fibenol
  • Fiberlean Technologies
  • FineCell Sweden AB
  • FKuR Kunststoff GmbH
  • Floreon
  • FP Innovations
  • Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC
  • Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF
  • Fuji Pigment Co., Ltd.
  • Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd
  • Futuramat Sarl
  • GCR
  • Gema Elektro Plastik ve Elektronik San. Dis Tic. A.S.
  • Granbio Technologies
  • Green Dot Bioplastics
  • GreenNano Technologies Inc.
  • Grupp MAIP
  • GS Alliance Co. Ltd
  • Hattori Shoten K.K.
  • Hexa Chemical Co. Ltd./Nature Gift
  • Hokuetsu Toyo Fiber Co., Ltd.
  • Hya Bioplastics
  • INCA Renewtech
  • Indochine Bio Plastiques (ICBP) Sdn Bhd
  • Jiangsu Jinhe Hi-Tech Co., Ltd.
  • JinHui ZhaoLang High Technology Co., Ltd.
  • Kaneka Corporation
  • Kao Corporation
  • Komporize
  • Lactips S.A.
  • Lean Orb
  • Lenzing AG
  • LEUNA-Harze GmbH
  • Lingrove, Inc.
  • LyondellBasell Industries Holdings B.V.
  • Malai Biomaterials Design Pvt. Ltd. (Malai)
  • Marine Innovation Co., Ltd
  • Melodea Ltd.
  • Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation
  • Mitsubishi Polyester Film GmbH
  • Mitsui Chemicals, Inc.
  • Mobius
  • MOCOM Compounds GmbH & Co. KG
  • Modern Synthesis
  • Mogu S.r.l.
  • MycoWorks
  • Mynusco Spectrus Sustainable Solutions Pvt. Ltd.
  • Natural Fiber Welding, INc.
  • nature2need Spectalite GmbH
  • Navitas d.o.o (NANOCRYSTACELL)
  • New Zealand Natural Fibers (NZNF)
  • Newlight Technologies LLC
  • Nippon Paper Industries
  • Nippon Shizai Co., Ltd
  • Norske Skog AS
  • Norwegian Mycelium AS (NoMy)
  • Novamont S.p.A.
  • NUREL S.A.
  • Oji Paper Company
  • OrganoClick
  • Panasonic
  • Pivot Materials LLC
  • Plafco Fibertech Oy
  • Plantic Technologies Ltd.
  • Plantics B.V.
  • Plásticos Compuestos S.A.
  • Pond Biomaterials
  • PRISMA Renewable Composites
  • Procotex
  • PT Intera Lestari Polimer
  • PTT MCC Biochem Co., Ltd.
  • Puro Bioplastics
  • Radici Group
  • Rengo Co., Ltd.
  • Renmatix
  • Ripro Corporation
  • Rise Innventia AB
  • Rodenburg Biopolymers B.V.
  • Saudi Basic Industries Corp. (SABIC)
  • Seevix Material Sciences Ltd.
  • Seiko PMC Corporation
  • Shandong Fuwin New Material Co., Ltd.
  • Shanghai Tong-Jie-Liang Biomaterials Co., Ltd.
  • Shellworks
  • Shenzhen Ecomann Biotechnology Co., Ltd.
  • Shenzhen Esun Industrial Co., Ltd.
  • Sirmax S.p.A.
  • Solvay SA
  • Soma Bioworks/White Lemur Co.
  • Spolchemie
  • Starlite Co., Ltd.
  • STORA ENSO OYJ
  • Sugino Machine Limited
  • Sulapac Oy
  • Sulzer Chemtech AG
  • SUPLA Bioplastics
  • Suzano (Woodspin)
  • Sweetwater Energy
  • Tandem Repeat
  • TBM Co., Ltd.
  • TECNARO GmbH
  • Teijin Ltd
  • TerraVerdae BioWorks Inc
  • The Japan Steel Works Ltd
  • Tianan Biologic Material Co., Ltd.
  • Toppan Printing Co., Ltd.
  • TotalEnergies Corbion
  • Unitika Co., Ltd.
  • UPM Biochemicals
  • UPM Biocomposites
  • Verso Corporation
  • VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd
  • Werewool
  • West Fraser Timber Co Ltd
  • Yokohama Rubber Co. Ltd.
  • Zelfo Technology GmbH

Methodology

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