Understanding Automotive Electronics. Edition No. 7

  • ID: 1765347
  • Book
  • 616 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
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Understanding Automotive Electronics is the first port of call for control engineers, system engineers and electronic engineers in the automotive industry needing a thorough grounding in automotive electronics and control.

From simple automotive electronic circuits to the latest developments in telematics, active safety, entertainment and communications, the book is also an ideal resource for more senior automotive engineers without a background in electronics or control needing to work in the area or supervise specialists.

Thoroughly updated throughout, this new edition moves away from introductory mechanic-level electronics to cover more hot topics such as transmission control, hybrid control, AUTOSAR (AUTomotive Open System ARchitecture) and vehicle networks.

  • Comprehensive coverage of automotive electronics and control, including the latest technology in telematics, active safety, entertainment and communications
  • Covers the topic from an engineering perspective rather than a technician or mechanic-focused trouble-shooting level
  • Ideal as a conversion tool for control and electronic engineers moving into the automotive industry and a valuable reference for all automotive engineers without an electronics background needing to understand this far-reaching topic
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Preface 1. Automotive Fundamentals 2. The Systems Approach to Control and Instrumentation 3. Electronics Fundamentals 4. Microcomputer Instrumentation and Control 5. The Basics of Electronic Engine Control 6. Sensors and Actuators 7. Digital Engine Control Systems 8. Vehicle Motion Control 9. Automotive Instrumentation and Telematics 10. Diagnostics Glossary Answers to Quizzes Index

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Ribbens, William
Professor Ribbens received his B.S.E.E. degree in 1960, his M.S.E.E. degree in 1961, and his Ph.D. degree in 1965, all from the University of Michigan. From 1962-69, he was an assistant research engineer, associate research engineer, and research engineer. He was appointed assistant professor in 1969 and was promoted to associate professor in 1972 and professor in 1993. He was appointed professor of aerospace engineering in 1995. His research most recently has focused on electronic systems and devices that are applicable to all vehicles. His particular emphasis has been on engine control applications, mathematical models for drive-train systems, computer-assisted diagnostics for electronically controlled engines, and failure detection systems. His work in these areas has substantially advanced the art of automotive electronics, and he is recognized as a world leader in this area. He served on the Hitachi Science Board, a distinction given to few U.S. academics. He was also a visiting scientist at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, General Motors Technical Center, and the Technical University of Berlin.
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