Measuring ROI in Environment, Health, and Safety

  • ID: 2396601
  • Book
  • 488 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Using the most successful evaluation system in the world for measuring impact and ROI the ROI Methodology learn how to measure the success of all business programs and projects involving environmental initiatives, health–related programs for employees and citizens, and various safety programs in all types of settings

Few topics are more important than the health and safety of employees, associates, and citizens. Organizations focus a tremendous amount of money/resources on maintaining a zero–harm approach to its employees, the greater community, and the surrounding environment. At the same time, organizations are implementing many types of wellness and fitness programs ensuring that employees remain healthy, safe, and productive. Measuring ROI in Environment, Health, and Safety shows how to measure the success of all types of programs and projects involving environmental initiatives, health–related programs for employees and citizens, and various safety programs in all types of settings.

Environmental efforts, or green projects, can represent value for organizations. Eighty percent can deliver a positive ROI, and the other 20 percent are often required by regulation. In either case, it is critical to understand whether or not these projects are working. This new book will show step–by–step how to measure the success of many types of green programs. Within an organization, responsibility for environment, health, and safety is often under the direction of the same executive team. Their concern is always about how well the programs are working and, more importantly, what can be done to ensure that they are more successful.

ROI in Environment, Health, and Safety introduces the ROI Methodology, now used by over 4,000 organizations, and the most successful and utilized evaluation system in the world for measuring program impact and ROI. It shows step–by–step how to capture the reaction to the various initiatives and programs a firm may institute, the learning necessary to make them successful, progress in terms of application and implementation, the specific business impact measures driven by these programs, and, finally, the financial ROI. Along the way, data is collected for process improvement to ensure that if certain programs are not working, they can be adjusted for success.

This groundbreaking new volume:

  • Shows those responsible for environmental, health, and safety programs in their organizations the impact of these programs and if they are not working how to make them successful
  • Fills the need for a book that specializes in showing real–life Return On Investment (ROI) of these programs for primary stakeholders
  • Focuses on measuring the success of various programs across all three areas of environment, health, and safety (EHS), making it the only book of its kind
  • Contains many real–world case studies showing how these programs have been successfully implemented
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Preface xxi

List of Authors xxxi

1 Environment, Health and Safety is Everywhere 1

1.1 The New Role of EHS 2

1.2 Environmental Initiatives 2

1.3 Safety Initiatives 6

1.4 Health and Fitness 13

1.5 Managing Change in EHS 17

1.6 Final Thoughts 19

2 Is It Worth It? 21

2.1 EHS Killers 22

2.2 Value Redefi ned 28

2.3 Why Now? 31

2.4 EHS Chain of Impact 35

2.5 Shortcomings of Current Measurement and Evaluation Systems 38

2.6 EHS Leadership: A Requirement for Success 43

2.7 Challenges Along the Way 44

2.8 Final Thoughts 47

3 Investing in Environment, Safety and Health Initiatives 49

3.1 Overview 49

3.2 Strategy 1: Avoid the Investment 50

3.3 Strategy 2: Invest the Minimum 55

3.4 Strategy 3: Invest with the Rest 58

3.5 Strategy 4: Invest Until It Hurts 62

3.6 Strategy 5: Invest as Long as there is Payoff 66

3.7 Final Thoughts 70

4 The ROI Methodology: A Tool to Measure and Improve 73

4.1 A Brief Overview 74

4.2 Results Framework 74

4.3 Results Framework and Business Alignment 79

4.4 Benefi ts of Developing the Chain of Impact 82

4.5 The ROI Process Model 83

4.6 Operating Standards and Philosophy 96

4.7 Case Application and Practice 96

4.8 Implementation 97

4.9 Benefi ts of Applying the ROI Methodology 98

4.10 Final Thoughts 101

5 Project Positioning 103

5.1 Creating Business Alignment 104

5.2 Determining Payoff Needs 107

5.3 Determining Business Needs 111

5.4 Determining Performance Needs 118

5.5 Determining Learning Needs 120

5.6 Determining Preference Needs 121

5.7 Developing Objectives for EHS Projects and Programs 122

5.8 Case Study Examples 126

5.9 Final Thoughts 134

6 Measuring Reaction and Learning 135

6.1 Why Measure Reaction? 135

6.2 Sources of Data for Measuring Reaction 138

6.3 Areas of Feedback 139

6.4 Data Collection Timing for Measuring Reaction 140

6.5 Data Collection Methods for Measuring Reaction 141

6.6 Use of Reaction Data 142

6.7 Why Measure Learning? 143

6.8 Challenges and Benefi ts of Measuring Learning 144

6.9 Learning Measurement Issues 146

6.10 Data Collection Methods for Measuring Learning 147

6.11 Use of Learning Data 149

6.12 Final Thoughts 150

7 Measuring Application, Implementation and Impact 151

7.1 Why Measure Application and Implementation? 152

7.2 Application Measurement Issues 153

7.3 Data Collection Methods for Measuring Application 157

7.4 Barriers to Application 159

7.5 Use of Application Data 160

7.6 Why Measure Impact? 160

7.7 Impact Measurement Issues 161

7.8 Data Collection Methods for Measuring Impact 165

7.9 Considerations for Selecting Data Collection Methods 169

7.10 Measuring the Hard to Measure 172

7.11 Final Thoughts 173

8 Isolating the Impact of EHS Projects 175

8.1 Why the Concern About Isolating Project Impact? 176

8.2 Preliminary Issues 179

8.3 Methods to Isolate the Impact of Projects 181

8.4 Considerations When Selecting Isolation Methods 198

8.5 Final Thoughts 199

9 Converting Impact Data to Money 201

9.1 Why the Concern About Converting Data to Monetary Values? 202

9.2 Five Steps to Convert Data to Money 204

9.3 The Five Steps to Convert Data in Practice 206

9.4 Methods to Convert Impact Measures to Money 207

9.5 Considerations When Selecting Data Conversion Methods 215

9.6 Intangible Benefi ts of EHS Projects 219

9.7 Final Thoughts 226

10 Calculating the ROI 227

10.1 Why the Concern About Project Costs? 228

10.2 Fundamental Cost Issues 229

10.3 Fully Loaded Cost Profi le 233

10.4 Cost Classifi cations 235

10.5 The ROI Calculation 236

10.6 ROI Misuse 238

10.7 ROI Targets 240

10.8 Intangibles Revisited 241

10.9 Other ROI Measures 241

10.10 Final Thoughts 243

11 Reporting Results 245

11.1 Why the Concern About Communicating Results? 246

11.2 Principles of Communicating Results 247

11.3 The Process for Communicating Results 250

11.4 The EHS Scorecard 261

11.5 Final Thoughts 268

12 Implementing and Sustaining ROI 271

12.1 The Concern About Implementing and Sustaining ROI 272

12.2 Implementing the Process: Overcoming Resistance 273

12.3 Assessing the Climate 274

12.4 Developing Roles and Responsibilities 274

12.5 Establishing Goals and Plans 278

12.6 Revising or Developing Policies and Guidelines 279

12.7 Preparing the Project Team 280

12.8 Initiating ROI Projects 282

12.9 Preparing Sponsors and Management Team 283

12.10 Removing Obstacles 284

12.11 Monitoring Progress 286

12.12 Final Thoughts 287

13 Measuring ROI in Safety Management for Project Leaders 291

13.1 Background 291

13.2 Why Evaluate this Program? 294

13.3 The ROI Process 295

13.4 Planning for Evaluation 297

13.5 Data Collection Plan 297

13.6 ROI Analysis Plan 297

13.7 Action Planning: A Key to ROI Analysis 300

13.8 ROI Forecast with Reaction Data 303

13.9 Improving Response Rates 305

13.10 Results 306

13.11 Communication Strategy 316

13.12 Lessons Learned 316

13.13 Discussion Questions 317

14 Measuring ROI in a Modular/Reusable Safety Railing System 319

14.1 Background 320

14.2 Problem Defi nition 321

14.3 Project Background 322

14.4 Business Alignment 323

14.5 Evaluation Methodology 323

14.6 Evaluation Results 328

14.7 Communication Strategy 336

14.8 Lessons Learned 336

14.9 Questions For Discussion 337

15 Measuring ROI in an Ergonomics–Based Risk Management Intervention 339

15.1 Background 339

15.2 Evaluation Methodology 343

15.3 Evaluation Results 350

15.4 Communication Strategy 356

15.5 Lessons Learned 356

16 Measuring ROI in Stress Management 361

16.1 Background 361

16.2 Why ROI? 365

16.3 Program Results 373

16.4 Communication Strategies 384

16.5 Policy and Practice Implications 385

16.6 Questions for Discussion 385

17 Measuring ROI in a Safety Incentive Program 387

17.1 Background 387

17.2 The Solution 389

17.3 Data Collection and Analysis 391

17.4 Data Interpretation and Conclusion 393

17.5 Calculating the Return on Investment 394

17.6 Communication of Results 395

17.7 Questions for Discussion 396

18 Measuring ROI in a Job Safety Training Program at a Major Food Retailer 397

18.1 Background 398

18.2 Evaluation Methodology 400

18.3 Calculating ROI 406

18.4 Barriers and Enablers 408

18.5 Communication Plan 409

18.6 Conclusion 411

18.7 About the Author 411

19 Measuring ROI in a Work–at–Home Program 413

19.1 FMI: PART A 414

19.2 FMI: PART B 421

19.3 FMI: PART C 424

19.4 FMI: PART D 427

19.5 FMI: PART E 428

19.6 FMI: PART F 432

19.7 Questions for Discussion 440

19.8 FMI: PART G 440

19.9 Questions for Discussion 442

Index 443

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Jack J. Phillips
Patricia Pulliam Phillips
Al Pulliam
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