Understanding Biocorrosion. European Federation of Corrosion (EFC) Series

  • ID: 2899592
  • Book
  • Region: Europe
  • 446 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
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Biocorrosion refers to corrosion influenced by bacteria adhering to surfaces in biofilms. Biocorrosion is a major problem in areas such as cooling systems and marine structures where biofilms can develop. This book summarises key recent research in this subject. Part one looks at theories of biocorrosion and measurement techniques. Part two discusses how bacteria and biofilms result in biocorrosion. The final part of the book includes case studies of biocorrosion in areas as diverse as buildings, fuels, marine environments and cooling systems.

- Provides a detailed overview of biocorrosion and the different scientific and/or industrial problems related to microbially induced corrosion- Introduces a variety of investigative techniques and methodologies that are employed in diagnosing and evaluating microbially induced corrosion- Includes case studies on: biodeterioration of building materials; biocorrosion issues associated with diesel and biofuels; marine biocorrosion; corrosion of open recirculating cooling water systems and cooling system components; the effect of H2S on steel corrosion

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  • List of contributors
  • Series introduction
  • Volumes in the EFC series
  • Preface
  • Part One: Turbomachinery Development
    • 1: Understanding corrosion: basic principles
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Materials and surfaces
      • 1.3 Basic corrosion processes
      • 1.4 Main forms of corrosion degradation
      • 1.5 Conclusion
    • 2: Biofilms and biocorrosion
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Biofilms
      • 2.3 Corrosion and biocorrosion
      • 2.4 Molecular techniques for the investigation of biofilm communities
      • 2.5 DNA microarrays
      • 2.6 Mass spectrometric metabolomics for the study of biofilm-influenced corrosion
      • 2.7 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgements
    • 3: Molecular methods for studying biocorrosion
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Requirements for molecular biological studies
      • 3.3 Molecular methods based on the analysis of the 16S- and 18S-rRNA gene sequences
      • 3.4 Functional genes as a molecular tool
      • 3.5 Other useful methods
    • 4: Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and biocorrosion
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Microbially induced corrosion (MIC)
      • 4.3 Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB): bringing together hydrogen, sulphur and nitrogen biocycles
      • 4.4 Electron transfer (ET) processes relevant for SRB
      • 4.5 Bacteria and metal surfaces: influence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs)
      • 4.6 Useful methods and tools for MIC assessment
      • 4.7 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgements
    • 5: Electroactive biofilms
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Different types of electron transfer mechanisms
      • 5.3 Examples of electroactive biofilms (EABs) from the lab
      • 5.4 EABs and technological applications
      • 5.5 EABs and biocorrosion
      • 5.6 Conclusions
    • 6: Immobilization and trapping of living bacteria and applications in corrosion studies
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Materials and methods
      • 6.3 Immunoimmobilization, trapping bacteria and applications
      • 6.4 BiyoTrap and applications
      • 6.5 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgements
  • Part Two: Evaluating and modelling biocorrosion
    • 7: Physical and local electrochemical techniques for measuring corrosion rates of metals
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Global measurement of corrosion rate
      • 7.3 Electrochemical techniques for monitoring generalized corrosion
      • 7.4 Electrochemical techniques for monitoring localized corrosion
      • 7.5 Conclusions
    • 8: Surface analysis techniques for investigating biocorrosion
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis
      • 8.3 Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analysis
      • 8.4 Combining different analysis techniques
      • 8.5 Conclusions
    • 9: Modelling long term corrosion of steel infrastructure in natural marine environments
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Models and modelling
      • 9.3 Models for corrosion
      • 9.4 Factors involved in marine corrosion
      • 9.5 Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC)
      • 9.6 Corrosion loss model
      • 9.7 Effects of nutrient pollution
      • 9.8 Accelerated low water corrosion (ALWC)
      • 9.9 Evaluating the effect of nutrient pollution
      • 9.10 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgements
    • 10: Modeling mechanisms in biocorrosion
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Corrosion diagrams
      • 10.3 Interfacial changes due to microbially influenced corrosion (MIC)
      • 10.4 Localized corrosion
      • 10.5 Modeling
      • 10.6 Conclusions and recommendations
  • Part Three: Case studies
    • 11: Biodeterioration of concrete, brick and other mineral-based building materials
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Biodeterioration of natural and man-made building materials
      • 11.3 Microorganisms that cause the biodeterioration of mineral-based materials
      • 11.4 Factors contributing to the biodeterioration of mineral-based materials
      • 11.5 Symptoms of mineral-based material biodeterioration
      • 11.6 The case of concrete biodeterioration
      • 11.7 The case of bricks and mortar biodeterioration
      • 11.8 Conclusions
    • 12: Biocorrosion issues associated with the use of ultra-low sulfur diesel and biofuel blends in the energy infrastructure
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 The need for cleaner diesel fuel
      • 12.3 The impact of organosulfur compounds on anaerobic metabolism
      • 12.4 The impact of desulfurization on diesel fuel stability
      • 12.5 Assessment of diesel additives: fatty acid methyl esters (FAME)
      • 12.6 Fuel composition and inocula are equally important
      • 12.7 Conclusions
    • 13: Understanding marine biocorrosion: experiments with artificial and natural seawater
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Effect of nutrients and oxygen removal on biocorrosion
      • 13.3 Comparison of experiments in natural and artificial seawater
      • 13.4 Variability in the composition of natural seawater
      • 13.5 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgements
    • 14: Managing open recirculating cooling water systems to minimize contamination and corrosion
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Description of the scope of the work
      • 14.3 Conclusions
      • 14.4 Sources of further information and advice
      • Acknowledgements
      • Appendix 1 Scope of the work document for open recirculating cooling water systems, 1/31/2013, Company X, Plant X, supplier service requirements
      • Appendix 2 Guidelines for best practices for the control of Legionella, July 2008
    • 15: Risk assessment of biocorrosion in condensers, pipework and other cooling system components
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Biofouling/biocorrosion
      • 15.3 Biocorrosion risk mitigation
      • 15.4 Monitoring systems
      • 15.5 Conclusions
    • 16: The effect of H2S on the corrosion of steels
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Carbon steel and low alloy steels in H2S containing solutions
      • 16.3 Stainless steels: microstructures and corrosion
      • 16.4 Conclusion
  • Index
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Liengen, TTurid Liengen, Statoil ASA Technology, Norway.
Basseguy, RRégine Basséguy, CNRS Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, France.
Feron, DamienDamien Féron, CEA Saclay, France.
Beech, IIwona Beech, University of Oklahoma, USA
Birrien, V
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