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Parkinson's Disease - US Epidemiology Forecast to 2030

  • ID: 4330868
  • Drug Pipelines
  • July 2021
  • Region: United States
  • 120 Pages
  • DelveInsight
UP TO OFF
until Dec 31st 2021
This ‘Parkinson's disease (PD)- Epidemiology Forecast - 2030' report delivers an in-depth understanding of the historical and forecasted epidemiology of Parkinson's disease in the United States.

Parkinson's disease (PD): Disease Understanding


American Association of Neurological Surgeons defines Parkinson's disease as a progressive disorder that is caused by degeneration of nerve cells in the part of the brain called the substantia nigra, which controls movement. These nerve cells die or become impaired, losing the ability to produce an important chemical called dopamine. Normally, dopamine operates in a delicate balance with other neurotransmitters to help coordinate the millions of nerve and muscle cells involved in the movement. Without enough dopamine, this balance is disrupted, resulting in tremor (trembling in the hands, arms, legs, and jaw), rigidity (stiffness of the limbs), slowness of movement, and impaired balance and coordination are hallmark symptoms of Parkinson's disease. People with Parkinson's also lose the nerve endings that produce norepinephrine, the main chemical messenger of the sympathetic nervous system, which controls many automatic functions of the body, such as heart rate and blood pressure. The loss of norepinephrine might help explain some of the non-movement features of Parkinson's, such as fatigue, irregular blood pressure, decreased movement of food through the digestive tract, and sudden drop in blood pressure when a person stands up from a sitting or lying-down position.

Parkinson's symptoms usually begin gradually and get worse over time. As the disease progresses, people may have difficulty walking and talking. They may also have mental and behavioral changes, sleep problems, depression, memory difficulties, and fatigue. According to the National Institute on Aging, Parkinson's disease affects both men and women. However, the disease affects about 50% more men than women.

Symptoms of Parkinson's and the rate of progression differ among individuals. Sometimes people dismiss early symptoms of Parkinson's like the effects of normal aging. In most cases, there are no medical tests to detect disease, so it can be challenging to diagnose accurately. Early symptoms of Parkinson's disease are subtle and occur gradually. For example, affected people may feel mild tremors or have difficulty getting out of a chair. They may notice that they speak too softly, or that their handwriting is slow and looks cramped or small. People with Parkinson's often develop a parkinsonian gait that includes a tendency to lean forward, small quick steps as if hurrying forward, and reduced swinging of the arms. They also may have trouble initiating or continuing movement. Studies have shown that symptoms of Parkinson's develop in patients with an 80% or greater loss of dopamine-producing cells in the substantia nigra. As per National Health Services, around one in 500 people are affected by Parkinson's disease. Most people with Parkinson's start to develop symptoms when they're over 50, although around one in 20 people with the condition first experience symptoms when they're under 40.

The exact cause of Parkinson's is unknown. It may have both genetic and environmental components. Low levels of dopamine and norepinephrine, a substance that regulates dopamine, have been linked with Parkinson's. Abnormal proteins called Lewy bodies have also been found in the brains of people with Parkinson's. While there is no known cause, research has identified groups of people who are more likely to develop the condition. These include:

  • Sex: Men are one and a half times more likely to get Parkinson's than women.
  • Race: Whites are more likely to get Parkinson's than African Americans or Asians.
  • Age: Parkinson's usually appears between the ages of 50 and 60. It only occurs before the age of 40 in 5-10% of cases.
  • Family history: People who have close family members with Parkinson's disease are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, too.
  • Toxins: Exposure to certain toxins may increase the risk of Parkinson's disease.
  • Head injury: People who experience head injuries may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease.

Because Parkinson's disease develops over time, various stages help identify how symptoms have progressed and what should be expected next. Generally, there are five stages of Parkinson's disease:

  • Stage I
  • Stage II
  • Stage III
  • Stage IV
  • Stage V
Currently, there is no cure for Parkinson's disease; therefore, treatments are available to help reduce the main symptoms and maintain quality of life for as long as possible. A variety of medicines sometimes help symptoms dramatically. Surgery and deep brain stimulation (DBS) can help in severe cases. With DBS, electrodes are surgically implanted in the brain. They send electrical pulses to stimulate the parts of the brain that control movement.

Parkinson's disease: Epidemiology


The Parkinson's disease epidemiology division provides insights into the historical and current patient pool, along with the forecasted trend in the United States. It helps recognize the causes of current and forecasted trends by exploring numerous studies and views of key opinion leaders. This part of the report also provides the diagnosed patient pool and their trends, along with assumptions undertaken.

Key Findings


The disease epidemiology covered in the report provides historical and forecasted Parkinson's disease epidemiology segmented as the Total Prevalent Cases of Parkinson's disease, Gender-specific Cases of Parkinson's disease, Severity-specific Prevalence of Parkinson's disease, Age-specific Cases of Parkinson's disease, and Prevalent Population of Parkinson's Disease based on onset. The report includes the prevalent scenario of Parkinson's disease in the United States from 2018 to 2030.

Parkinson's disease Epidemiology


The epidemiology segment also provides the Parkinson's disease epidemiology data and findings in the United States.

The total prevalent population of Parkinson's disease in the United States was estimated to be 1,073,894 cases in 2020.

Scope of the Report

  • Parkinson's disease report covers a detailed overview explaining its causes, symptoms, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment patterns.
  • Parkinson's disease Epidemiology Report and Model provide an overview of the risk factors and trends of Parkinson's disease in the United States
  • The report provides insight into the historical and forecasted patient pool of Parkinson's disease in the United States.
  • The report helps recognize the growth opportunities in the United States concerning the patient population.
  • The report assesses the disease risk and burden and highlights the unmet needs of Parkinson's disease.
  • The report provides the segmentation of the Parkinson's disease epidemiology by prevalent cases of Parkinson's disease in the United States
  • The report provides the segmentation of the Parkinson's disease epidemiology by gender-specific cases of Parkinson's disease in the United States
  • The report provides the segmentation of the Parkinson's disease epidemiology by age-specific cases of Parkinson's disease in the United States.
  • The report provides the Parkinson's disease epidemiology segmentation by severity-specific cases of Parkinson's disease in the United States.
  • The report provides the segmentation of the Parkinson's disease epidemiology by a prevalent population of Parkinson's Disease based on onset in the United States

Report Highlights

  • 10-year Forecast of Parkinson's disease epidemiology
  • United States Coverage
  • Prevalent Cases of Parkinson's disease
  • Gender-specific Cases of Parkinson's disease
  • Age-specific Cases of Parkinson's disease
  • Severity-specific Cases of Parkinson's disease
  • Onset-specific Cases of Parkinson's disease

KOL Views


The publisher interviews KOLs and obtain SME's opinions through primary research to fill the data gaps and validate our secondary research. The opinion helps understand the total patient population and current treatment pattern. This will support the clients in potential upcoming novel treatment by identifying the overall scenario of the indications.

Key Questions Answered

  • What will be the growth opportunities in the United States for the patient population pertaining to Parkinson's disease?
  • What are the key findings pertaining to the Parkinson's disease epidemiology in the United States?
  • What would be the total number of patients with Parkinson's disease in the United States during the forecast period (2018-2030)?
  • At what CAGR the patient population is expected to grow in the United States during the forecast period (2018-2030)?
  • What are the disease risk, burdens, and unmet needs of Parkinson's disease?
  • What are the currently available treatments for Parkinson's disease?

Reasons to Buy


Parkinson's disease Epidemiology report will allow the user to:

  • Develop business strategies by understanding the trends shaping and driving the United States Parkinson's disease market.
  • Quantify patient populations in the global Parkinson's disease market to improve product design, pricing, and launch plans.
  • Organize sales and marketing efforts by identifying the age groups and sex that present the best opportunities for Parkinson's disease therapeutics in each of the markets covered.
  • Understand the magnitude of the Parkinson's disease population by its prevalent cases.
  • Understand the magnitude of the Parkinson's disease population by its age-specific cases.
  • Understand the magnitude of the Parkinson's disease population by gender-specific cases.
  • Understand the magnitude of the Parkinson's disease population by severity-specific cases.
  • Understand the magnitude of the Parkinson's disease population-based on disease onset.
  • The Parkinson's disease epidemiology report and model were written and developed by Masters and Ph.D. level epidemiologists
  • The Parkinson's disease Epidemiology Model developed by the publisher is easy to navigate, interactive with dashboards, and epidemiology based on transparent and consistent methodologies. Moreover, the model supports data presented in the report and showcases disease trends over a 10-year forecast period using reputable sources

Key Assessments

  • Patient Segmentation
  • Disease Risk and Burden
  • Risk of disease by the segmentation
  • Factors driving growth in a specific patient population
Study Period: 2018-2030

According to UC San Diego Health (n.d.), PD is currently recognized as one of the most common neurological conditions. PD is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts around 1.0-1.5 million people in the US alone, with 50,000-60,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Worldwide, it is estimated that approximately 5 million people have PD.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
1. Key Insights

2. Report Introduction

3. Executive Summary of Parkinson's disease

4. Disease Background and Overview
4.1. Introduction
4.2. Cause of Parkinson's disease
4.3. Signs and Symptoms of Parkinson's disease
4.3.1. Motor Symptoms
4.3.2. Nonmotor Symptoms
4.3.3. Physical symptoms
4.3.4. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms
4.4. Stages of Parkinson's disease
4.5. Risk Factors for Parkinson's disease
4.5.1. Gender
4.5.2. Age
4.5.3. Ethnicity
4.5.4. Family History and Genetics
4.5.5. Head Trauma
4.5.6. Environmental Pesticides
4.6. Classification of Parkinson's disease
4.6.1. Juvenile Parkinson Disease
4.6.2. Young-onset Parkinson's disease
4.6.3. Idiopathic Parkinson Disease or Classic Parkinson Disease
4.7. Genetics of Parkinson's disease
4.7.1. Autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease genes
4.7.2. Autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease genes
4.7.3. Autosomal recessive genes causing Parkinsonism with atypical features
4.7.4. Autosomal dominant genes and loci with unclear pathogenicity
4.8. Pathophysiology
4.8.1. The Role of Dopamine
4.8.2. Lewy Bodies and Alpha-Synuclein
4.8.3. Inflammation and Immune Response
4.9. Diagnosis
4.9.1. CT (Computerized Tomography) scan
4.9.2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan
4.9.3. DaTSCAN-SPECT scan
4.9.4. PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scan
4.9.5. The importance of early diagnosis
4.9.6. Diagnostic Guidelines
4.9.7. Diagnostic Algorithm
4.10. Treatment and Management
4.10.1. Carbidopa-levodopa
4.10.2. Carbidopa-levodopa infusion
4.10.3. Dopamine agonists
4.10.4. Monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) inhibitors
4.10.5. Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors
4.10.6. Anticholinergics
4.10.7. Amantadine
4.11. Treatment algorithm
4.12. Treatment Guidelines
4.12.1. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE): Recommendation for Parkinson's disease
4.12.2. EFNS/MDS-ES recommendations on therapeutic management of Parkinson's disease 2010
4.12.3. American Academy of Family Physicians: Recommendations for Treatment of Parkinson's disease
4.12.4. American Academy of Neurology (ANN): Parkinson's disease Quality Measurement Set Update

5. Epidemiology and Patient Population
5.1. Key Findings
5.2. Epidemiology of Parkinson's disease
5.3. The United States
5.3.1. Total Prevalent Population of Parkinson's Disease (PD) in the United States
5.3.2. Gender-specific Prevalent Population of Parkinson's Disease (PD) in the United States
5.3.3. Age-specific Prevalent Population of Parkinson's Disease (PD) in the United States
5.3.4. Prevalent Population of Parkinson's Disease (PD) based on Onset in the United States
5.3.5. Stage-specific Prevalence of Parkinson's Disease (PD) in the United States

6. Organizations contributing toward Parkinson's disease

7. Patient Journey

8. Case Reports

9. KOL Views

10. Market Drivers

11. Market Barriers

12. SWOT Analysis

13. Unmet Needs

14. Appendix
14.1. Bibliography
14.2. Report Methodology

15. Publisher Capabilities

16. Disclaimer

17. About the Publisher

List of Tables
Table 1: Summary of Parkinson’s Disease, Market, Epidemiology, and Key Events (2018-2030)
Table 2: Signs and Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease
Table 3: Differential Diagnosis of Parkinsonism
Table 4: Formulations and key precautions for first-line drugs to treat Parkinson’s disease
Table 5: Potential benefits and harms of dopamine agonists, levodopa, and MAO B inhibitors
Table 6: Potential benefits and harms of dopamine agonists, levodopa, and MAO B inhibitors
Table 7: Pharmacological management of Non-Motor Symptoms
Table 8: Nonpharmacological management of motor and non-motor symptoms
Table 9: Practical recommendations for the treatment of early untreated PD
Table 10: Practical recommendations for the adjustment of initial therapy in patients without motor complications
Table 11: Practical recommendations for the treatment of early untreated PD
Table 12: Key Recommendations for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease
Table 13: Total Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Table 14: Gender-specific Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Table 15: Age-specific Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Table 16: Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) based on onset in the United States (2018-2030)
Table 17: Stage-specific Prevalence of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Table 18: Organizations contributing towards Parkinson’s Disease

List of Figures
Figure 1: Causes of Parkinson’s Disease
Figure 2: Stages of Parkinson’s disease
Figure 3: Causes of Parkinson’s disease
Figure 4: Risk Factors for Parkinson’s Disease
Figure 5: Types of Parkinson Disease
Figure 6: Dopamine level in a normal and Parkinson’s affected neuron
Figure 7: Pathways to Parkinson’s Disease
Figure 8: Queen Square Brain Bank UK PDS Brain Bank Criteria for the diagnosis of PD
Figure 9: Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease
Figure 10: Pharmacologic Treatment options available for Parkinson’s disease
Figure 11: Algorithm for medical treatment of Parkinson’s disease
Figure 12: Treatment guidelines for the progressive stages of Parkinson’s disease
Figure 13: Total Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the US (2018-2030)
Figure 14: Gender-specific Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Figure 15: Age-specific Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Figure 16: Prevalent Population of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) based on onset in the US (2018-2030)
Figure 17: Stage-specific Prevalence of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in the United States (2018-2030)
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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