BIM Handbook. A Guide to Building Information Modeling for Owners, Designers, Engineers, Contractors, and Facility Managers. 3rd Edition

  • ID: 4454876
  • Book
  • 688 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Discover BIM: A better way to build better buildings

Building Information Modeling (BIM) offers a novel approach to design, construction, and facility management in which a digital representation of the building product and process is used to facilitate the exchange and interoperability of information in digital format. BIM is beginning to change the way buildings look, the way they function, and the ways in which they are designed and built.

The BIM Handbook, Third Edition provides an in–depth understanding of BIM technologies, the business and organizational issues associated with its implementation, and the profound advantages that effective use of BIM can provide to all members of a project team. Updates to this edition include:

  • Information on the ways in which professionals should use BIM to gain maximum value
  • New topics such as collaborative working, national and major construction clients, BIM standards and guides
  • A discussion on how various professional roles have expanded through the widespread use and the new avenues of BIM practices and services
  • A wealth of new case studies that clearly illustrate exactly how BIM is applied in a wide variety of conditions

Painting a colorful and thorough picture of the state of the art in building information modeling, the BIM Handbook, Third Edition guides readers to successful implementations, helping them to avoid needless frustration and costs and take full advantage of this paradigm–shifting approach to construct better buildings that consume fewer materials and require less time, labor, and capital resources.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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FOREWORD

PREFACE

Chapter 1: Introduction

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.1 INTRODUCTION

1.2 THE CURRENT AEC BUSINESS MODEL

1.2.1 Design–Bid–Build

1.2.2 Design–Build

1.2.3 Construction Management at Risk

1.2.4 Integrated Project Delivery

1.2.5 What Kind of Building Procurement Is Best When BIM Is Used?

1.3 DOCUMENTED INEFFICIENCIES OF TRADITIONAL APPROACHES

1.3.1 CIFE Study of Construction Industry Labor Productivity

1.3.2 NIST Study of Cost of Construction Industry Inefficiency

1.4 BIM: NEW TOOLS AND NEW PROCESSES

1.4.1 BIM Platforms and Tools

1.4.2 BIM Processes

1.4.3 Definition of Parametric Objects

1.4.4 Support for Project Team Collaboration

1.5 BIM AS A LIFECYCLE PLATFORM

1.6 WHAT IS NOT A BIM PLATFORM?

1.7 WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF BIM? WHAT PROBLEMS DOES IT ADDRESS?

1.7.1 Preconstruction Benefits to Owner (Chapters 4 and 5)

1.7.2 Benefits for Design (Chapter 5)

1.7.3 Construction and Fabrication Benefits (Chapters 6 and 7)

1.7.4 Post Construction Benefits (Chapter 4)

1.8 BIM AND LEAN CONSTRUCTION

1.9 WHAT CHALLENGES CAN BE EXPECTED?

1.9.1 Challenges with Collaboration and Teaming

1.9.2 Legal Changes to Documentation Ownership and Production

1.9.3 Changes in Practice and Use of Information

1.9.4 Implementation Issues

1.10 FUTURE OF DESIGNING AND BUILDING WITH BIM (Chapter 9)

1.11 CASE STUDIES (Chapter 10)

Chapter 1 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 2: Core Technologies and Software

2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2.1 THE EVOLUTION TO OBJECT–BASED PARAMETRIC MODELING

2.1.1 Early 3D Modeling

2.1.2 Degrees of Parametric Modeling

2.1.3 Predefined versus User–Defined Parametric Objects and Libraries

2.2 BEYOND PARAMETRIC SHAPES

2.2.1 Property and Attribute Handling

2.2.2 Drawing Generation

2.2.3 Scalability

2.2.4 Object Management and Links

2.2.5 Some Commonly Asked Questions

2.3 BIM ENVIRONMENTS, PLATFORMS, AND TOOLS

2.3.1 Considerations for BIM Design Applications

2.3.2 Considerations for a BIM Environment

2.4 BIM MODEL QUALITY AND MODEL CHECKING

2.5 BIM PLATFORMS

2.5.1 Allplan

2.5.2 ArchiCAD

2.5.3 Bentley Systems

2.5.4 DESTINI Profiler

2.5.5 Digital Project

2.5.6 Revit

2.5.7 Tekla Structures

2.5.8 Vectorworks

2.5.9 AutoCAD–Based Applications

2.6 DESIGN REVIEW APPLICATIONS

2.6.1 Model Viewers

2.6.2 Model Integration Tools

2.6.3 Model Checkers

2.7 CONCLUSION

Chapter 2 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 3: Collaboration and Interoperability

3.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

3.1 INTRODUCTION

3.2 DIFFERENT KINDS OF DATA EXCHANGE METHODS

3.3 BACKGROUND OF PRODUCT DATA MODELS

3.3.1 Modeling Languages

3.3.2 ISO–STEP in Building Construction

3.3.3 buildingSMART and IFC

3.3.4 What Is the IFC?

3.3.5 IDM and MVD

3.4 OTHER EFFORTS SUPPORTING STANDARDIZATION

3.4.1 buildingSMART Data Dictionary

3.4.2 OmniClass

3.4.3 COBie

3.4.4 XML–Based Schemas

3.5 THE EVOLUTION FROM FILE–BASED EXCHANGE TO

BIM SERVERS

3.5.1 Project Transactions and Synchronization

3.5.2 Functionality of BIM Servers

3.5.3 BIM Server Review

3.6 Interfacing Technologies

3.6.1 Semi–Automated Approaches

3.6.2 Semantic Approaches

Chapter 3 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 4: BIM For Owners And Facility Managers

4.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

4.1 INTRODUCTION: WHY OWNERS SHOULD CARE ABOUT BIM

4.2 OWNER S ROLE IN A BIM PROJECT

4.2.1 Design Assessment

4.2.2 Complexity of Building Infrastructure and Building Environment

4.2.3 Sustainability

4.2.4 Public Construction Agencies: BIM Adoption Guidelines

4.3 COST AND TIME MANAGEMENT

4.3.1 Cost Management

4.3.2 Time to Market: Schedule Management

4.3.3 Facility and Information Asset Management

4.3.4  BIM Tool Guide for Owners

4.3.5 BIM Cost Estimating Tools

4.3.6 Facility and Asset Management Tools

4.3.7 Operation Simulation Tools

4.4 AN OWNER AND FACILITY MANAGER S BUILDING MODEL

4.4.1 Information Content of BIM–FM model

4.4.2 Alternative Approaches to Creating a BIM–FM model

4.4.3 Classification of Model Data and Standards

4.5 LEADING THE BIM IMPLEMENTATION ON A PROJECT

4.5.1 Develop Guidelines for Use of BIM on Projects

4.5.2 Build Internal Leadership and Knowledge

4.5.3 Service Provider Selection

4.5.4 Provide for Use of a Big Room for Design and Construction

4.6 BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING BIM: RISKS AND COMMON MYTHS

4.7 ISSUES FOR OWNERS TO CONSIDER WHEN ADOPTING BIM

Chapter 4 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 5: BIM For Architects and Engineers

5.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

5.1 INTRODUCTION

5.2 SCOPE OF DESIGN SERVICES

5.2.1 Collaborative Forms of Project Delivery

5.2.2 The Concept of Information Development

5.2.3 Civil and Infrastructure Design

5.3 BIM USE IN DESIGN PROCESSES

5.3.1 Concept Design

5.3.2 Prefabrication

5.3.3 Analysis, Simulation, and Optimization

5.3.4 Construction–Level Building Models

5.3.5 Design–Construction Integration

5.3.6 Design Review

5.4 BUILDING OBJECT MODELS AND LIBRARIES

5.4.1 Embedding Expertise into Building Components

5.4.2 Object Libraries

5.4.3 BOM Portals

5.4.4 Desktop/LAN Libraries

5.5 CONSIDERATIONS IN ADOPTION FOR DESIGN PRACTICE

5.5.1 Justification and Platform Selection

5.5.2 Phased Utilization

Chapter 5 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 6: BIM For Contractors

6.0. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

6.1. INTRODUCTION

6.2. TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION FIRMS

6.3. INFORMATION CONTRACTORS WANT FROM BIM

6.4. BIM–ENABLED PROCESS CHANGE

6.4.1. Leaner Construction

6.4.2. Less Paper in Construction

6.4.3. Increased Distribution of Work

6.5. DEVELOPING A CONSTRUCTION BUILDING INFORMATION MODEL

6.5.1. Production Detailing

6.5.2. Big Room Co–location Onsite

6.6. USING A CONTRACTOR BUILDING INFORMATION MODEL

6.7. 3D: VISUALIZATION AND COORDINATION

6.8. 4D: CONSTRUCTION ANALYSIS AND PLANNING

6.8.1. 4D Models to Support Construction Planning

6.8.2. Benefits of 4D Models

6.8.3. BIM Tools with 4D Capability

6.8.4. BIM–Supported Planning and Scheduling Issues and Guidelines

6.9. 5D: QUANTITY TAKEOFF AND COST ESTIMATING

6.9.1. Extracting Quantities from BIM Models for Estimating

6.9.2. Guidelines and BIM Implementation Issues to Support Quantity Takeoff and Estimating

6.10. PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL

6.11. OFFSITE FABRICATION AND MODULAR CONSTRUCTION

6.11.1 Surveying Site Conditions

6.12. BIM IN THE FIELD

6.12.1. Delivering Design Information to the Field

6.12.2. Coordinating Production

6.13. COST AND SCHEDULE CONTROL AND OTHER MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS

6.14. COMMISSIONING AND TURNOVER

Chapter 6 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 7: BIM For Subcontractors and Fabricators

7.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

7.1 INTRODUCTION

7.2 TYPES OF SUBCONTRACTORS AND FABRICATORS

7.2.1 Subcontractor Trades

7.2.2 Made–to–Stock and Made–to–Order Component Suppliers

7.2.3 Engineered–to–Order Component Fabricators

7.2.4 Design Service Providers and Specialist Coordinators

7.2.5 Full–Service Design–Build Prefabricated and Modular Construction

7.3 THE BENEFITS OF A BIM PROCESS FOR SUBCONTRACTOR FABRICATORS

7.3.1 Marketing and Tendering

7.3.2 Reduced Production Cycle Times

7.3.3 Reduced Design Coordination Errors

7.3.4 Lower Engineering and Detailing Costs

7.3.5 Increased Use of Automated Manufacturing Technologies

7.3.6 Increased Preassembly, Prefabrication, and Modular Construction

7.3.7 Quality Control, Supply Chain Management, and Lifecycle Maintenance

7.4 GENERIC BIM SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS FOR FABRICATORS

7.4.1 Parametric and Customizable Parts and Relationships

7.4.2 Reporting Components for Fabrication

7.4.3 Interface to Management Information Systems

7.4.4 Interoperability

7.4.5 Information Visualization

7.4.6 Automation of Fabrication Tasks

7.5 SPECIFIC BIM REQUIREMENTS FOR FABRICATION

7.5.1 Traditional ETO Component Fabricators

7.5.2 Modular Construction

7.5.3 3D Printing and Robotic Construction

7.6 ADOPTING BIM IN A FABRICATION OPERATION

7.6.1 Setting Appropriate Goals

7.6.2 Adoption Activities

7.6.3 Planning the Pace of Change

7.6.4 Human Resource Considerations

Chapter 7 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 8: Facilitators of BIM Adoption and Implementation

8.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

8.1 INTRODUCTION

8.2 BIM MANDATES

8.2.1 Significance of Government BIM Mandates

8.2.2 The Status of Government BIM Mandates around the World

8.2.3 Motivations

8.2.4 BIM Requirements

8.2.5 Challenges and Considerations

8.3 BIM ROADMAPS, MATURITY MODELS AND MEASURES

8.3.1 BIM Roadmaps

8.3.2 BIM Maturity Models

8.3.3 BIM Measures

8.4 BIM GUIDES

8.4.1 BIM Guides by Region and Organization

8.4.2 BIM Guides by Topic

8.5 BIM EDUCATION AND TRAINING

8.5.1 Transition of Senior Staff

8.5.2 BIM Roles and Responsibilities

8.5.3 Industry Training and Certificate Programs

8.5.4 University Education Programs

8.5.5 Considerations for Training and Deployment

8.6 LEGAL, SECURITY, AND BEST PRACTICE ISSUES

8.6.1 Legal and Intellectual Property Issues

8.6.2 Cyber Security for BIM

8.6.3 Best Practices and Other Social Issues

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Chapter 8 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 9: The Future: Building with BIM

9.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

9.1 INTRODUCTION

9.2 BIM BEFORE 2000: PREDICTING TRENDS

9.3 DEVELOPMENT AND IMPACT OF BIM: 2000 TO 2017

9.3.1 Impact on Owners: Better Options, Better Reliability

9.3.2 Impact on the Design Professions

9.3.3 Impact on Construction Companies

9.3.4 Impact on Building Material and Component Suppliers

9.3.5 Impact on Construction Education: Integrated Education

9.3.6 Impact on Statutory Authorities: Model Access and Review

9.3.7 Impact on Project Documentation: On–Demand Drawings

9.3.8 Impact on BIM Tools: More Integration, More Specialization, More Information

9.4 CURRENT TRENDS

9.4.1 Process Trends

9.4.2 Technology Trends

9.4.3 Integrative Process and Technology Trends

9.4.4 Trends in BIM Research

9.4.5 Obstacles to Change

9.5 VISION 2025

9.5.1 Thoroughly Digital Design and Construction

9.5.2 A New Culture of Innovation in Construction

9.5.3 Offsite Construction

9.5.4 Construction Regulation: Automated Code–Checking

9.5.5 Artificial Intelligence in Construction

9.5.6 Globalization

9.5.7 Support for Sustainable Construction

9.6 BEYOND 2025

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Chapter 9 DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Chapter 10: BIM Case Studies

10.0 INTRODUCTION

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.1 NATIONAL CHILDREN S HOSPITAL, DUBLIN

10.1.1 Introduction

10.1.2 Motivation for the Project

10.1.3 The Building

10.1.4 The NCH Project

10.1.5 The BIM Executive Plan (BEP)

10.1.6 Visualization, Simulation, and Design Optimization

10.1.7 Summary of BIM Benefits

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

10.2 HYUNDAI MOTORSTUDIO GOYANG, SOUTH KOREA

10.2.1 Project Overview

10.2.2 Complex Spatial Arrangement: BIM–Based Design Coordination

10.2.3 Free–Form Patterned Exterior: Panelization

10.2.4 Largest Mega Truss Structure in Korea: Laser Scanning

10.2.5 Perception Gap between Participants: VR and 4D simulation

10.2.6 Needs for Schedule Reduction: Multitrade Prefabrication

10.2.7 Lessons Learned and Conclusion

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.3 FONDATION LOUIS VUITTON, PARIS

10.3.1 Introduction

10.3.2 Project Design Workflow and Software Technology

10.3.3 Design of the Structure and Sails

10.3.4 Model Analyses

10.3.5 Generative Detailing Using 3D Intelligent Components

10.3.6 Concrete Iceberg Panelization and Optimization for Fabrication

10.3.7 Fabrication of the Glass Sails

10.3.8 Integrated Use of the BIM Model

10.3.9 Lessons Learned

10.3.10 Conclusion

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.4 DONGDAEMUN DESIGN PLAZA, SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA

10.4.1 Introduction

10.4.2 Challenges during the Design Phase

10.4.3 Challenges during the Construction Phase

10.4.4 BIM to Fabrication

10.4.5. Lessons Learned

10.4.6 Conclusion and Future Outlook

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.5 SAINT JOSEPH HOSPITAL, DENVER

10.5.1 Organizational Structure and the Collaboration Agreement

10.5.2 The BIM Execution Plan

10.5.3 Simulations and Analyses

10.5.4 BIM Support for Prefabrication

10.5.5 Ensuring Metrics Help Inform Future Efforts

10.5.6 Risk and Safety Benefits of BIM and Prefabrication

10.5.7 BIM in the Field

10.5.8 BIM for Facility Management

10.5.9 Lessons Learned: Best Practices

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

ONLINE SOURCES

10.6 VICTORIA STATION, LONDON UNDERGROUND

10.6.1 History

10.6.2 The Project

10.6.3 Engineering Challenges

10.6.4 The Role of BIM

10.6.5 BIM Benefits to the Project

10.6.6 Postscript

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.7 NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENT RESIDENCE HALLS, SINGAPORE

10.7.1 Introduction

10.7.2 Project Overview

10.7.3 Project Organization/Management

10.7.4 PPVC Workflow

10.7.5 BIM Implementation

10.7.6 Parametric PPVC Library

10.7.7 Benefits Realization

10.7.8 Conclusion and Lessons Learned

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.8 MAPLETREE BUSINESS CITY II, SINGAPORE

10.8.1 Introduction

10.8.2 Communication and Collaboration Issues

10.8.3 BIM Coordination Meetings

10.8.4 BIM Execution Planning

10.8.5 Data Exchange

10.8.6 Productivity Gains

10.8.7 Innovative Uses of BIM

10.8.8 Simulation and Analysis

10.8.9 BIM in the Field

10.8.10 Conclusion

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.9 PRINCE MOHAMMAD BIN ABDULAZIZ INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, MEDINA, UAE

10.9.1 Project Information

10.9.2 Novel/Innovative Use of BIM

10.9.3 Communication and Collaboration

10.9.4  Stakeholder Involvement

10.9.5 Risk

10.9.6 BIM in the Field

10.9.7 Lessons Learned: Problems, Challenges, Solutions

10.9.8 Conclusion and Future Outlook

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.10 HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE, CHEVY CHASE, MARYLAND

10.10.1 Introduction

10.10.2 Background

10.10.3 The Challenges

10.10.4 An FM–Capable BIM

10.10.5 Impact Analysis Using an FM–Capable BIM

10.10.6 Lessons Learned Thus Far

10.10.7 Path Forward

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

10.11 STANFORD NEUROSCIENCE HEALTH CENTER, PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

10.11.1 Introduction

10.11.2 Project Details

10.11.3 The Pilot

10.11.4 Making the Case

10.11.5 The Journey

10.11.6 The Team

10.11.7 Executing the Pilot

10.11.8 Use Case Metrics

10.11.9 Results of Use Cases

10.11.10 Summary of Benefits

10.11.11 BIM Costs and Impact on Annual Budget

10.11.12 Lessons Learned

10.11.13 Conclusion and Future Outlook

Glossary

References

Index

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Rafael Sacks
Chuck Eastman
Ghang Lee
Paul Teicholz
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