Cutting-Edge Technology for Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage. Advances in Natural Gas Engineering

  • ID: 4515840
  • Book
  • 384 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
1 of 4

Compiled from a conference on this important subject by three of the most well–known and respected editors in the industry, this volume provides some of the latest technologies related to carbon capture, utilization and, storage (CCUS).

Of the 36 billon tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) being emitted into Earth′s atmosphere every year, only 40 million tons are able to be captured and stored. This is just a fraction of what needs to be captured, if this technology is going to make any headway in the global march toward reversing, or at least reducing, climate change. CO2 capture and storage has long been touted as one of the leading technologies for reducing global carbon emissions, and, even though it is being used effectively now, it is still an emerging technology that is constantly changing.

This volume, a collection of papers presented during the Cutting–Edge Technology for Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CETCCUS), held in Clermont–Ferrand, France in the fall of 2017, is dedicated to these technologies that surround CO2 capture. Written by some of the most well–known engineers and scientists in the world on this topic, the editors, also globally known, have chosen the most important and cutting–edge papers that address these issues to present in this groundbreaking new volume, which follows their industry–leading series, Advances in Natural Gas Engineering, a seven–volume series also available from Wiley–Scrivener.

With the ratification of the Paris Agreement, many countries are now committing to making real progress toward reducing carbon emissions, and this technology is, as has been discussed for years, one of the most important technologies for doing that. This volume is a must–have for any engineer or scientist working in this field.

This groundbreaking new volume:

  • Presents emerging, state–of–the–art processes and technologies for CO2 capture, one of the most important elements in natural gas engineering that can reduce the carbon footprint
  • Covers the most recent advances in natural gas engineering for utilization and storage of CO2, one of the hottest topics in the energy industry
  • Covers technologies for working towards a zero–emission process in natural gas production
  • Written by a team of the world′s most well–known scientists and engineers in the field
READ MORE
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 4

Preface xv

Introduction xvii

Part I: Carbon Capture and Storage 1

1 Carbon Capture Storage Monitoring ( CCSM ) 3
E.D. Rode, L.A. Schaerer, Stephen A. Marinello and G. v. Hantelmann

1.1 Introduction 4

1.2 State of the Art Practice 5

1.3 Marmot s CCSM Technology 6

1.4 Principles of Information Analysis 10

1.5 Operating Method 12

1.6 Instrumentation and Set up 14

Abbreviations 16

References 16

2 Key Technologies of Carbon Dioxide Flooding and Storage in China 19
Hao Mingqiang and Hu Yongle

2.1 Background 20

2.2 Key Technologies of Carbon dioxide Flooding and Storage 21

2.2.1 CO2 Miscible Flooding Theory in Continental Sedimentary Reservoirs 21

2.2.2 The Storage Mechanism of CO2 in Reservoirs and Salt Water Layers 22

2.2.3 Reservoir Engineering Technology of CO2 Flooding and Storage 22

2.2.4 High Efficiency Technology of Injection and Production for CO2 Flooding 23

2.2.5 CO2 Long–Distance Pipeline Transportation and Supercritical Injection Technology 23

2.2.6 Fluid Treatment and Circulating Gas Injection Technology of CO2 Flooding 24

2.2.7 Reservoir Monitoring and Dynamic Analysis and Evaluation Technology of CO2 Flooding 24

2.3 Existing Problems and Technical Development Direction 25

2.3.1 The Vital Communal Troubles & Challenges 25

2.3.2 Further Orientation of Technology Development 25

3 Mapping CCUS Technological Trajectories and Business Models: The Case of CO2–Dissolved 27
X. Galiègue, A. Laude and N. Béfort

3.1 Introduction 27

3.2 CCS and Roadmaps: From Expectations to Reality ... 29

3.3 CCS Project Portfolio: Between Diversity and Replication 30

3.3.1 Demonstration Process: Between Diversity and Replication 30

3.3.2 Diversity of the Current Project Portfolio 32

3.4 Going Beyond EOR: Other Business Models for Storage? 36

3.4.1 The EOR Legacy 36

3.4.2 From EOR to a CCS Wide–Scale Deployment 37

3.5 Coupling CCS and Geothermal Energy: Lessons from the CO2–DISSOLVED Project Study 39

3.5.1 CO2–DISSOLVED Concept 39

3.5.2 Techno–Economic Analysis of CO2–DISSOLVED 41

3.5.3 Business Models and the Replication/Diversity Dilemma 42

3.6 Conclusion 42

Acknowledgements 43

References 43

4 Feasibility of Ex–Situ Dissolution for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration 47
Yuri Leonenko

4.1 Introduction 47

4.2 Methods to Accelerate Dissolution 50

4.2.1 In–situ 50

4.2.2 Ex–situ 52

4.3 Discussion and Conclusions 56

Acknowledgments 57

References 57

Part II: EOR 59

5 CO2 Gas Injection as an EOR Technique Phase Behavior Considerations 61
Henrik Sørensen and Jawad Azeem Shaikh

5.1 Introduction 61

5.2 Features of CO2 62

5.3 Miscible CO2 Drive 63

5.4 Immiscible CO2 Drives and Density Effects 68

5.5 Asphaltene Precipitation Caused by Gas Injection 72

5.6 Gas Revaporization as EOR Technique 75

5.7 Conclusions 76

List of Symbols 76

References 77

Appendix A Reservoir Fluid Compositions and Key Property Data 78

6 Study on Storage Mechanisms in CO2 Flooding for Water–Flooded Abandoned Reservoirs 83
Rui Wang, Chengyuan Lv, Yongqiang Tang, Shuxia Zhao, Zengmin Lun and Maolei Cui

6.1 Introduction 83

6.2 CO2 Solubility in Coexistence of Crude Oil and Brine 85

6.3 Mineral Dissolution Effect 88

6.4 Relative Permeability Hysteresis 90

6.5 Effect of CO2 Storage Mechanisms on CO2 Flooding 92

6.6 Conclusions 93

References 93

7 The Investigation on the Key Hydrocarbons of Crude Oil Swelling via Supercritical CO2 95
Haishui Han, Shi Li, Xinglong Chen, Ke Zhang, Hongwei Yu and Zemin Ji

7.1 Introduction 96

7.2 Hydrocarbon Selection 97

7.3 Experiment Section 97

7.3.1 Principle 97

7.3.2 Apparatus and Samples 99

7.3.3 Experimental Scheme Design 100

7.3.4 Procedures 100

7.4 Results and Discussion 101

7.4.1 Results and Data Processing 101

7.4.2 Volume Swelling Influenced by the Hydrocarbon Property 103

7.4.3 A New Parameter of Molar Density for Evaluating Hydrocarbon Volume Swelling 104

7.4.4 Advantageous Hydrocarbons 105

7.5 Conclusions 109

Acknowledgments 109

Nomenclature 109

References 110

8 Pore–Scale Mechanisms of Enhanced Oil Recovery by CO2 Injection in Low–Permeability Heterogeneous Reservoir 113
Ze–min Ji, Shi Li and Xing–long Chen

8.1 Introduction 114

8.2 Experimental Device and Samples 114

8.3 Experimental Procedure 115

8.3.1 Experimental Results 117

8.4 Quantitative Analysis of Oil Recovery in Different Scale Pores 118

8.5 Conclusions 120

Acknowledgments 120

References 120

Part III: Data Experimental and Correlation 123

9 Experimental Measurement of CO2 Solubility in a 1 mol/kgw CaCl2 Solution at Temperature from 323.15 to 423.15 K and Pressure up to 20 MPa 125
M. Poulain, H. Messabeb, F. Contamine, P. Cézac, J.P. Serin, J.C. Dupin and H. Martinez

9.1 Introduction 125

9.2 Literature Review 126

9.3 Experimental Section 127

9.3.1 Chemicals 127

9.3.2 Apparatus 128

9.3.3 Operating Procedure 128

9.3.4 Analysis 129

9.4 Results and Discussion 130

9.5 Conclusion 130

Acknowledgments 132

References 132

10 Determination of Dry–Ice Formation during the Depressurization of a CO2 Re–Injection System 135
J.A. Feliu, M. Manzulli and M.A. Alós

10.1 Introduction 136

10.2 Thermodynamics 137

10.3 Case Study 139

10.3.1 System Description 139

10.3.2 Objectives 141

10.3.3 Scenarios 141

10.3.4 Simulation Runs Conclusions 145

10.4 Conclusions 146

11 Phase Equilibrium Properties Aspects of CO2 and Acid Gases Transportation 147
A. Chapoy, and C. Coquelet

11.1 Introduction 148

11.1.1 State of the Art and Phase Diagrams 150

11.2 Experimental Work and Description of Experimental Setup 151

11.3 Models and Correlation Useful for the Determination of Equilibrium Properties 157

11.4 Presentation of Some Results 159

11.5 Conclusion 165

Acknowledgments 166

References 166

12 Thermodynamic Aspects for Acid Gas Removal from Natural Gas 169
Tianyuan Wang, Elise El Ahmar and Christophe Coquelet

12.1 Introduction 169

12.2 Thermodynamic Models 171

12.3 Results and Discussion 173

12.3.1 Hydrocarbons and Mercaptans Solubilities in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solution 173

12.3.2 Acid Gases (CO2/H2S) Solubilities in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solution 174

12.3.3 Multi–component Systems Containing CO2–H2S–Alkanolamine–Water–Methane–Mercaptan 177

12.4 Conclusion and Perspectives 178

Acknowledgements 179

References 179

13 Speed of Sound Measurements for a CO2 Rich Mixture 181
P. Ahmadi and A. Chapoy

13.1 Experimental Section 182

13.1.1 Material 182

13.1.2 Experimental Setup 182

13.2 Results and Discussion 183

13.3 Conclusion 184

References 185

14 Mutual Solubility of Water and Natural Gas with Different CO2 Content 187
H.M. Tu, P. Guo, J.F. Du, Shao–fei Wang, Ya–ling Zhang, Yan–kui Jiao and Zhou–hua Wang

14.1 Introduction 188

14.2 Experimental 190

14.2.1 Materials 190

14.2.2 Experimental Apparatus 190

14.2.3 Experimental Procedures 192

14.3 Thermodynamic Model 193

14.3.1 The Cubic–Plus–Association Equation of State 193

14.3.2 Parameterization of the Model 195

14.4 Results and Discussion 196

14.4.1 Phase Behavior of CO2–Water 196

14.4.2 The Mutual Solubility of Water–Natural Gas 198

14.5 Conclusion 207

Acknowledgement 211

References 211

15 Effect of SO2 Traces on Metal Mobilization in CCS 215
A. Martínez–Torrents, S. Meca, F. Clarens, M. Gonzalez–Riu and M. Rovira

15.1 Introduction 215

15.2 Experimental 216

15.2.1 Sample Preparation 216

15.2.1.1 Sandstone 216

15.2.1.2 Brine 217

15.2.2 Experimental Set–up 217

15.2.3 Experimental Methodology 217

15.3 Results and Discussion 219

15.3.1 Major Components 219

15.3.2 Trace Metals 222

15.3.2.1 Strontium 224

15.3.2.2 Manganese 225

15.3.2.3 Copper 226

15.3.2.4 Zinc 226

15.3.2.5 Vanadium 227

15.3.2.6 Lead 227

15.3.3 Metal Mobilization 228

15.4 Conclusions 230

Acknowledgements 231

References 232

16 Experiments and Modeling for CO2 Capture Processes Understanding 235
Yohann Coulier, William Ravisy, J–M. Andanson, Jean–Yves Coxam and Karine Ballerat–Busserolles

16.1 Introduction 236

16.2 Chemicals and Materials 240

16.3 Vapor–Liquid Equilibria 241

16.3.1 Experimental VLE of Pure Amine 241

16.3.2 Experimental VLE of {Amine H2O} System 243

16.3.3 Modeling VLE 243

16.4 Speciation at Equilibrium 245

16.4.1 Equilibrium Measurements 1H and 13C NMR 246

16.4.2 Modeling of Species Concentration 249

Acknowledgment 252

References 252

Part IV: Molecular Simulation 255

17 Kinetic Monte Carlo Molecular Simulation of Chemical Reaction Equilibria 257
Braden D. Kelly and William R. Smith

References 261

18 Molecular Simulation Study on the Diffusion Mechanism of Fluid in Nanopores of Illite in Shale Gas Reservoir 263P. Guo, M.H. Zhang and H.M. Tu

18.1 Introduction 264

18.2 Models and Simulation Details 265

18.2.1 Models and Simulation Parameters 265

18.2.2 Data Processing and Computing Methods 266

18.3 Results and Discussion 268

18.3.1 Variation Law of Self Diffusion Coefficient 268

18.3.2 Density Distribution 270

18.3.3 Radial Distribution Function 271

18.4 Conclusions 273

Acknowledgements 274

References 275

19 Molecular Simulation of Reactive Absorption of CO2 in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions 277
Weikai Qi and William R. Smith

References 279

Part V: Processes 281

20 CO2 Capture from Natural Gas in LNG Production. Comparison of Low–Temperature Purification Processes and Conventional Amine Scrubbing 283
Laura A. Pellegrini, Giorgia De Guido, Gabriele Lodi and Saeid Mokhatab

20.1 Introduction 284

20.2 Description of Process Solutions 286

20.2.1 The Ryan–Holmes Process 288

20.2.2 The Dual Pressure Low–Temperature Distillation Process 290

20.2.3 The Chemical Absorption Process 292

20.3 Methods 295

20.4 Results and Discussion 298

20.5 Conclusions 303

Nomenclature 304

Abbreviations 304

Symbols 305

Subscripts 305

Superscripts 306

Greek Symbols 306

References 306

21 CO2 Capture Using Deep Eutectic Solvent and Amine (MEA) Solution 309
Mohammed–Ridha Mahi, Ilham Mokbel, Latifa Négadi and Jacques Jose

21.1 Experimental Section 309

21.2 Results and Discussion 310

21.2.1 Validation of the Experimental Method 310

21.2.2 Solubility of CO2 in the Solvent DES/MEA 311

21.2.3 Solubility of CO2 Comparison Between DES + MEA and DES Solvent 313

21.2.4 Solubility of CO2 Comparison Between (DES + MEA) and (H2O + MEA) Solvent 313

21.5 Conclusion 315

References 315

22 The Impact of Thermodynamic Model Accuracy on Sizing and Operating CCS Purification and Compression Units 317
S. Lasala, R. Privat and J.–N. Jaubert

22.1 Introduction 318

22.2 Thermodynamic Systems in CCUS Technologies 319

22.2.1 Compositional Characteristics of CO2 Captured Flows 319

22.2.2 Post–Combustion 320

22.2.3 Oxy–Fuel Combustion 321

22.2.4 Pre–Combustion 324

22.3 Operating Conditions of Purification and Compression Units 329

22.4 Quality Specifications of CO2 Capture Flows 332

22.5 Cubic Equations of State for CCUS Fluids 334

22.6 Influence of EoS Accuracy on Purification and Compression Processes 340

22.7 Purification by Liquefaction 340

22.8 Purification by Stripping 347

22.9 Compression 351

22.10 Conclusions 354

Nomenclature and Acronyms 355

References 357

Index 361

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
3 of 4

Loading
LOADING...

4 of 4

Karine Ballerat–Busserolles, PhD, is Research Engineer at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) in France since 2000 and Research Associate at Mines Paristech PSL since 2016. Dr. Ballerat–Busserolles holds doctoral degrees and HDR (habilitation to direct research) in Physical Chemistry and in Thermodynamics from the Blaise Pascal University, Clermont–Ferrand, France. Her main activities concern the physico–chemical understanding of gas dissolution in liquid media from an experimental point of view. She is the author and co–author of 3 book chapters and more than 30 publication and 50 presentations.

Ying Wu is currently the President of Sphere Technology Connection Ltd. (STC) in Calgary, Canada. From 1983 to 1999 she was an Assistant Professor and Researcher at Southwest Petroleum Institute (now Southwest Petroleum University, SWPU) in Sichuan, China. She received her MSc in Petroleum Engineering from the SWPU and her BSc in Petroleum Engineering from Daqing Petroleum University in Heilongjiang, China.

John J. Carroll, PhD, PEng is the Director, Research and Technology for Gas Liquids Engineering, Ltd. in Calgary, Canada. Dr. Carroll holds bachelor and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, and is a registered professional engineer in the provinces of Alberta and New Brunswick in Canada. His first book, Natural Gas Hydrates: A Guide for Engineers, is now in its third edition, and he is the author or co–author of 50 technical publications and about 40 technical presentations.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
5 of 4
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll