+353-1-416-8900REST OF WORLD
+44-20-3973-8888REST OF WORLD
1-917-300-0470EAST COAST U.S
1-800-526-8630U.S. (TOLL FREE)

Connected Care in Europe - 4th Edition

  • PDF Icon

    Report

  • 170 Pages
  • June 2022
  • Region: Europe
  • Berg Insight AB
  • ID: 4760583

Connected Care Revenues in Europe Will Reach € 7.0 Billion by 2027

How should the mobile industry address the vast business opportunity in the connected care market? The analyst forecasts that the number of cellular connections in the connected care market in Europe will increase from 3.3 million in 2021 to more than 9.1 million in 2027. Learn more about how wireless technology can become seamlessly integrated with telehealth and telecare solutions in this 170 page in-depth report.



This report will allow you to:

  • Profit from 30 executive interviews with market leading companies.
  • Identify key players in the connected care ecosystem.
  • Learn about the latest developments in connected care devices and services.
  • Understand the dynamics of the European healthcare and social care systems.
  • Evaluate how the adoption of next-generation solutions is proceeding.
  • Benefit from expert market analysis including detailed market forecasts lasting until 2027.

The report answers the following questions:

  • Which are the main verticals within connected care?
  • What are the main drivers on this market in Europe?
  • How many people are using telecare systems in each European country?
  • What are the general technology trends for connected care products?
  • Which are the leading telecare equipment providers in Europe?
  • How will the connected care market evolve in the next five years?
  • How will the markets for telehealth, telecare and smart home solutions converge?
  • What is the potential market size for cellular IoT connectivity?
The analyst has found in its latest research that around 8.6 million people in Europe were using connected care solutions at the end of 2021. The figure refers to users of traditional telecare, next-generation telecare and telehealth solutions in the EU27+3 countries. Until 2027, the analyst forecasts that the number of connected care users will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.1 percent to reach 17.1 million. Traditional telecare is currently the largest and most mature of the three market segments, but the next-generation telecare and telehealth market segments are expected to have a higher growth rate in the next years. The analyst expects that next-generation telecare will overtake traditional telecare solutions and become the largest segment with a forecasted 7.7 million users in 2027. Traditional telecare will follow with 7.5 million users and the telehealth segment will have an estimated 5.7 million users at the end of the forecast period.

The traditional telecare equipment market in Europe is highly consolidated. The two major players - Tunstall and Legrand - hold leading positions in nearly all markets even though they are challenged by local players such as Careium, TeleAlarm and Chubb. The next-generation telecare market is on the other hand more fragmented. In addition to the leading telecare equipment vendors, companies active in the next-generation market include specialised providers such as Essence Group, Everon, Vitalbase and Vivago in activity monitoring; Navigil, Libify, Oysta Technology, SmartLife Care and Smartwatcher in mobile telecare; and Evondos, Vitavanti, AceAge and iZafe Group in medication compliance monitoring. The telehealth market is similarly a fragmented market that is evolving quickly and includes both start-ups and well-established solution providers such as Huma, Luscii, Dignio, Comarch, eDevice and SHL Telemedicine.

The European connected care industry is facing major changes that will reshape the competitive environment for solution vendors and service providers during the coming years. One of the main developments is the ongoing digitalisation of telephone networks around Europe. Large-scale replacements of telecare equipment will be needed as analogue devices do not function reliably on digitalised networks. At the same time, the digitalisation enables new types of solutions that can advance the delivery of care to the next level.

This includes next-generation telecare systems with new functions as well as integrated solutions that enable a combined delivery of telecare and telehealth services. “Care providers will start to offer more and more proactive and predictive services, by continuously analysing user data and acting on abnormalities.  Such solutions rely on data not only from telecare devices, but also from other sources such as smart home sensors, healthcare records and connected medical devices”, said Samuel Andersson, IoT Analyst. Another trend worth noting is the effect that the Covid-19 pandemic has had on the adoption of telehealth and remote patient monitoring solutions. “As lockdowns and quarantines were imposed all around the world, healthcare providers were motivated to adopt remote patient monitoring and telehealth solutions. This helped overcome some of the institutional hesitancy and conservatism that previously were major barriers for the adoption these solutions”, concluded Mr. Andersson.

Who should read this report?

Connected Care in Europe is the foremost source of information about the telehealth and telecare solution markets in this region. Whether you are an equipment vendor, care provider, telecom operator, investor, consultant, or government agency, you will gain valuable insights from our in-depth research.

Table of Contents

Executive summary
1 Healthcare and social care in Europe
1.1 Introduction
1.1.1 The ageing population
1.1.2 Metabolic syndrome and lifestyle-related diseases
1.2 Chronic diseases
1.2.1 Cardiovascular diseases
1.2.2 Chronic respiratory diseases
1.2.3 Diabetes
1.3 Neurological disorders, mental disorders and physical disabilities
1.3.1 Autism spectrum disorders
1.3.2 Dementia
1.3.3 Epilepsy
1.3.4 Other disorders and disabilities
1.4 Healthcare and social care systems
1.4.1 Healthcare systems
1.4.2 Social care systems
1.5 The regulatory environment
1.5.1 Medical device regulations
1.5.2 Privacy regulations
1.5.3 Standardisation
2 Traditional telecare solutions
2.1 Market overview
2.1.1 Form factors and use cases
2.1.2 Value chain
2.1.3 Competitive landscape
2.2 Solution providers
2.2.1 9Solutions
2.2.2 Althea
2.2.3 Azur Soft
2.2.4 Beghelli
2.2.5 Careium (Doro Care)
2.2.6 Chubb Community Care
2.2.7 Enovation (Verklizan)
2.2.8 Eurocross
2.2.9 Legrand Care
2.2.10 TeleAlarm Group
2.2.11 Tunstall Healthcare Group
2.2.12 Urmet ATE
2.2.13 Vitakt Hausnotruf
3 Next-generation telecare solutions
3.1 Market overview
3.1.1 Form factors and use cases
3.1.2 Value chain
3.1.3 Competitive landscape
3.2 Solution providers
3.2.1 AceAge
3.2.2 Appello
3.2.3 Buddi
3.2.4 Camanio
3.2.5 ContinYou
3.2.6 Essence Group
3.2.7 Everon
3.2.8 Evondos
3.2.9 GTX Corp
3.2.10 iZafe Group (MediRätt)
3.2.11 Just Checking
3.2.12 Libify
3.2.13 Limmex
3.2.14 Medimi
3.2.15 Merck Group
3.2.16 Navigil
3.2.17 Oysta Technology
3.2.18 Posifon
3.2.19 Sensio
3.2.20 Skyresponse
3.2.21 SmartLife Care
3.2.22 Smartwatcher
3.2.23 Telegrafik
3.2.24 Tellu
3.2.25 Vitalbase
3.2.26 Vitavanti Medical Solutions
3.2.27 VIVAI Software
3.2.28 Vivago
3.2.29 Yorbl
4 Telehealth solutions
4.1 Market overview
4.1.1 Form factors and use cases
4.1.2 Value chain
4.1.3 Competitive landscape
4.2 Solution providers
4.2.1 Ab Medica
4.2.2 Alphabet
4.2.3 Apple
4.2.4 Bepatient
4.2.5 BT Group
4.2.6 Comarch
4.2.7 Dignio
4.2.8 eDevice
4.2.9 Hope Care
4.2.10 Huma
4.2.11 KPN
4.2.12 Luscii
4.2.13 Medixine
4.2.14 MedM
4.2.15 OpenTeleHealth
4.2.16 S3 Connected Health
4.2.17 SHL Telemedicine
4.2.18 Telefónica
4.2.19 Vitagroup
4.2.20 Voluntis
5 Market forecasts and conclusions
5.1 Market trends and analysis
5.1.1 PSTN switch off continues to drive the transition to IP-based telecare
5.1.2 Millions of new cellular connections will be needed for connected care
5.1.3 BYOD has become a common option for telehealth
5.1.4 Technological developments changes the competitive landscape
5.1.5 Integrated data systems are becoming increasingly important
5.1.6 The digital shift enables new services and use cases
5.1.7 Convergence between telecare and telehealth towards integrated care
5.1.8 From frequent readings to AI-driven patient engagement
5.1.9 The use of mobile telecare solutions grows
5.1.10 A slowly awakening consumer market for telecare in Europe
5.1.11 COVID-19 became a catalyst that took telehealth into the next growth phase
5.2 Market forecasts
5.2.1 Traditional telecare
5.2.2 Next-generation telecare
5.2.3 Telehealth
5.3 Revenue forecasts
5.3.1 Traditional telecare
5.3.2 Next-generation telecare
5.3.3 Telehealth

Glossary
List of Figures
Figure 1.1: Population by age group (EU 27+3 2021-2050)
Figure 1.2: Share of population older than 65 years (EU 27+3 1960-2050)
Figure 1.3: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome conditions among adults (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 1.4: Number of people suffering from various chronic diseases (EU 27+3 2019)
Figure 1.5 Diabetes prevalence among adults aged 20-79 by country (Europe 2021)
Figure 1.6: Number of people suffering from dementia, ASD and epilepsy (EU 27+3 2017)
Figure 1.7: Total and per capita healthcare expenditure by region (Europe 2019)
Figure 1.8: Healthcare expenditure per capita by country (EU 27+3 2019)
Figure 1.9: Long-term care expenditure by country (EU 27+3 2019)
Figure 1.10: Elderly care expenditure by operating area (Sweden 2020)
Figure 1.11: Long term care expenditure by item (England April 2020-March 2021)
Figure 2.1: Analogue and digital telecare systems (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 2.2: Adoption of telecare services per country (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 2.3: Tunstall Lifeline telecare device
Figure 2.4: The telecare value chain
Figure 2.5: Leading providers of telecare equipment (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 2.6: Leading telecare solution providers per country (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 2.7: Overview of telecare solution providers (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 2.8: Eliza by Careium smartcare hub
Figure 2.9: Number of telecare units shipped by Legrand by country (2021)
Figure 3.1: Next-generation telecare solutions by segment (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 3.2: Adoption of activity monitoring solutions per country (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 3.3: Examples of mobile telecare devices
Figure 3.4: Care@Home activity monitoring solution
Figure 3.5: Dosell medication dispenser
Figure 3.6: Compliance monitoring solution form factors
Figure 3.7: Overview of the next-generation telecare value chain
Figure 3.8: Overview of the next-generation telecare landscape
Figure 3.9: Next-generation telecare solution providers
Figure 3.10: The Evondos E300 Automatic Medicine Dispenser
Figure 3.11: Limmex Emergency Watch
Figure 3.12: The Navigil 580 wristwatch
Figure 3.13: SmartLife Care’s telecare alarm system
Figure 3.14: Vivago Care 8001 watch
Figure 4.1: Adoption of telehealth services per country (EU 27+3 2021)
Figure 4.2: Connected medical devices and the provision of care
Figure 4.3: Overview of the telehealth value chain
Figure 4.4: Overview of the telehealth landscape
Figure 4.5: Telehealth solution providers
Figure 4.6: The bepatient.connect app
Figure 4.7: HealthGO by eDevice
Figure 4.8: Medixine Suite
Figure 4.9: MedM’s applications
Figure 5.1: Analogue and digital telecare systems (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.2: Cellular connections in the connected care market (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.3: Connected care systems (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.4: Traditional telecare systems (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.5: Next-generation telecare systems (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.6: Telehealth users (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.7: Connected care market revenues (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.8: Traditional telecare market revenues (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.9: Next-generation telecare market revenues (EU 27+3 2021-2027)
Figure 5.10: Telehealth market revenues (EU 27+3 2021-2027) 

Executive Summary

The ageing population and the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases will be two of the greatest challenges in Europe during this century. It is widely believed that connected care solutions can ease the burden on society by enabling more efficient delivery of care and allowing people to live independently in their homes for longer. The analyst’s definition of connected care comprises telecare and telehealth solutions that are used for the remote delivery of healthcare and social care services. Today, the most common connected care solution is the traditional telecare alarm, which includes a wearable alarm button that the user presses in the case of an emergency. Next-generation telecare systems are technologically more advanced and can automatically trigger an alarm, for instance, if the user leaves home at an unexpected time or forgets to take his or her medicine. Furthermore, next-generation telecare solutions include mobile telecare alarms that users always can carry with them at all times. Telehealth solutions involve connected medical devices and monitoring services that are used for the remote monitoring and management of patients with COPD, chronic heart failure, diabetes, hypertension, asthma, coronary heart disease or chronic kidney disease.

Traditional telecare is the largest and most mature segment of the connected care market with a total of 5.9 million users at the end of 2021. The market for next-generation telecare solutions is entering a growth phase with an estimated total of 2.9 million users in the EU 27+3 countries at the end of 2021, whereas the number of telehealth users reached 1.3 million. The total number of people using connected care solutions amounted to 8.6 million at the end of 2021, as there is an overlap between the three solution categories. The market is forecasted to grow at a CAGR of 12.1 percent during the next six years to reach 17.1 million connected care users by 2027. The analyst expects that traditional telecare will be overtaken by next-generation telecare as the largest segment of the connected care market with a forecasted 7.7 million users in 2027. However, traditional telecare will follow with 7.5 million users and telehealth with 5.7 million users at the end of the forecast period.

Connected care revenues in the EU 27+3 countries reached an estimated € 3.6 billion in 2021. This includes revenues from traditional telecare solutions, next-generation telecare solutions and telehealth solutions. The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 11.8 percent between 2021 and 2027 to reach € 7.0 billion at the end of the forecast period. Traditional telecare solutions accounted for the largest share of the market in 2021 but will not grow as quickly as the next-generation telecare and telehealth markets during the next six years.

The traditional telecare equipment market in Europe is highly consolidated. The two major players - Tunstall and Legrand - hold leading positions in nearly all markets and together account for almost two thirds of telecare unit sales in the region. The next-generation telecare market is on the other hand fragmented. In addition to the leading telecare equipment vendors, companies active in the next-generation market include specialised providers such as Essence Group, Just Checking, Vitalbase and Vivago in activity monitoring; Everon, Libify, Navigil, Oysta Technology, SmartLife Care and Smartwatcher in mobile telecare; and Evondos, Vitavanti, AceAge and iZafe Group in medication compliance monitoring. The telehealth market is similarly a fragmented market that is evolving quickly. Many new start-ups as well as well-established solution providers from adjacent industries are active on the market. Examples include Huma, Luscii, Dignio, Comarch, eDevice and SHL Telemedicine.

The ongoing digitalisation of telephone networks in Europe will require massive replacements of PSTN-based telecare systems in the coming years. At the same time, there is rising interest in new types of solutions that enable social care and healthcare services to be delivered more efficiently. The analyst expects that these trends will catalyse the transition to the next generation of connected care solutions. Future caregiving is also anticipated to be predictive in nature by continuously analysing user data and acting on abnormalities. Care providers will work with solutions that rely on data not only from telecare devices, but also from other sources such as smart home sensors and healthcare records. The transition to digital technologies is good news for mobile network operators, as the vast majority of all new connected care systems rely on cellular connectivity. In fact, the analyst predicts that the number of cellular connections will grow from around 3.3 million in 2021 to more than 9.1 million in 2027.

Companies Mentioned

A selection of companies mentioned in this report includes:

  • 9Solutions
  • Ab Medica
  • AceAge
  • Alphabet
  • Althea
  • Appello
  • Apple
  • Azur Soft
  • Beghelli
  • Bepatient
  • BT Group
  • Buddi
  • Camanio
  • Careium (Doro Care)
  • Chubb Community Care
  • Comarch
  • ContinYou
  • Dignio
  • eDevice
  • Enovation (Verklizan)
  • Essence Group
  • Eurocross
  • Everon
  • Evondos
  • GTX Corp
  • Hope Care
  • Huma
  • iZafe Group (MediRätt)
  • Just Checking
  • KPN
  • Legrand Care
  • Libify
  • Limmex
  • Luscii
  • Medimi
  • Medixine
  • MedM
  • Merck Group
  • Navigil
  • OpenTeleHealth
  • Oysta Technology
  • Posifon
  • S3 Connected Health
  • Sensio
  • SHL Telemedicine
  • Skyresponse
  • SmartLife Care
  • Smartwatcher
  • TeleAlarm Group
  • Telefónica
  • Telegrafik
  • Tellu
  • Tunstall Healthcare Group
  • Urmet ATE
  • Vitagroup
  • Vitakt Hausnotruf
  • Vitalbase
  • Vitavanti Medical Solutions
  • Vivago
  • VIVAI Software
  • Voluntis
  • Yorbl

Methodology

The Internet of Things is very diverse. There are hundreds of different use cases, each with different dynamics. The starting point is to segment the market.

The analyst begins with a number of sectors: Automotive, Cities, Health, Industry, Home, Industrial, Energy, Retail and Consumer Electronics. Each of these sectors breaks down into a number of applications. In total across all sectors, the analyst examines around 150 separate applications. It is at this application level that they generate their IoT forecast. The analyst builds reliable data bottom-up. They take into consideration the current adoption rate, regulations, demographics, vertical-specific statistics, value chain structure, etc.

The rigorous data collection methods are based on first-hand and secondary sources. The analyst conducts many hundreds of executive interviews on a yearly basis with companies from all parts of the IoT value chain.  They talk to on a regular basis all major mobile operator groups and regulators as well as the chipset, module, and terminal vendors. They also interview many companies in each of the vertical markets.

 

 

Loading
LOADING...