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Research Report on China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products, 2019-2023

  • ID: 4771560
  • Report
  • Region: China
  • 50 Pages
  • China Research & Intelligence
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Agricultural imports in quota are subject to low tariff rates while those out of quota are subject to high tariff rates.

The Interim Measures for Administration of Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products (hereinafter referred to as the Interim Measures) was a government document formulated by China's National Development and Reform Commission and put into force on Feb. 5, 2002. The Interim Measures determines the annual import tariff quotas for agricultural products according to China's schedule of concessions on goods in the accession to the WTO.

According to this analysis, by May 2019, the Interim Measures applies to agricultural products including wheat, corn, rice, sugar, cotton, wool and wool top. The import tariff quotas for wheat, corn, rice, sugar, and cotton are classified into the quotas to state trading enterprises and the quotas to non-state trading enterprises to give priority to state-owned enterprises. The import of wool and wool top is exclusive to designated companies.

It is believed that China's tariff rate quota administration for agricultural products has both advantages and disadvantages. On one hand, it protects the domestic agricultural product market from the impact of large quantities of low-price agricultural imports. Low in-quota tariff rates ensure low-cost raw materials to the agricultural product processing enterprises in China. On the other hand, the tariff rate quota administration triggers international trade disputes. For example, in Dec. 2016, the United States filed a lawsuit with the WTO against China's administration of the import tariff quotas for wheat, rice, and corn. In Apr. 2019, the United States won WTO ruling against China’s use of tariff-rate quotas for rice, wheat, and corn, which it successfully argued limited market access for U.S. grain exports. Besides, some applicants to the import tariff quotas are not agricultural product processing enterprises but trade companies. They resell agricultural products in quota to agricultural product processing enterprises with price markups. Consequently, agricultural product processing enterprises have to pay more for agricultural imports.

According to the author, the annual import tariff quotas for some agricultural products cannot be used up. For example, in 2018, China's corn imports totaled 3.52 million tons, accounting for only 48.90% of the quota quantity of 7.20 million tons; the wheat imports totaled about 3.10 million tons, accounting for only 32.20% of the quota quantity of 9,636,000 tons. Such surpluses are caused by strict eligibility criteria. Many downstream enterprises (such as feed processing enterprises and food processing enterprises) that fail to obtain the import tariff quotas purchase raw materials from other sources or even purchase agricultural products smuggled into China.

It is expected that the import tariff quotas for agricultural products will go out of date as China's foreign trade develops and China's economy becomes more global. However, most of these quotas will continue to exist from 2019 to 2023 because the Chinese government needs to protect the domestic agricultural product market and some state-owned enterprises can make profits from reselling tariff quotas.

Topics Covered:

  • Introduction to China's import tariff quotas for agricultural products
  • Analysis of advantages and disadvantages of China's import tariff quotas for agricultural products
  • China's import of agricultural products subject to tariff rate quota administration
  • Major enterprises granted with China's import tariff quotas for agricultural products
  • Forecast on development of China's import tariff quotas for agricultural products
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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1 Introduction to China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products
1.1 Definition of China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products
1.2 Development History of China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products
1.3 Government Departments Administering Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products
1.4 Agricultural Products Subject to Import Tariff Quotas

2 China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products and Eligibility Criteria for These Quotas
2.1 Corn
2.1.1 Import Tariff Quota for Corn
2.1.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Corn (2019)
2.1.3 Analysis on China's Corn Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.1.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Corn
2.2 Wheat
2.2.1 Import Tariff Quota for Wheat
2.2.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Wheat (2019)
2.2.3 Analysis on China's Wheat Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.2.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Wheat
2.3 Rice
2.3.1 Import Tariff Quota for Rice
2.3.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Rice (2019)
2.3.3 Analysis on China's Rice Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.3.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Rice
2.4 Cotton
2.4.1 Import Tariff Quota for Cotton
2.4.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Cotton (2019)
2.4.3 Analysis on China's Cotton Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.4.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Cotton
2.5 Sugar
2.5.1 Import Tariff Quota for Sugar
2.5.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Sugar (2019)
2.5.3 Analysis on China's Sugar Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.5.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Sugar
2.6 Wool
2.6.1 Import Tariff Quota for Wool
2.6.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Wool (2019)
2.6.3 Analysis on China's Wool Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.6.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Wool
2.7 Wool Top
2.7.1 Import Tariff Quota for Wool Top
2.7.2 Eligibility Criteria for Import Tariff Quota for Wool Top (2019)
2.7.3 Analysis on China's Wool Top Imports from 2014 to 2018
2.7.4 List of Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Wool Top

3 Prospect of China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products from 2019 to 2023
3.1 Analysis on Advantages and Disadvantages of China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products
3.1.1 Advantages
3.1.2 Disadvantages
3.2 Forecast on Quantities of China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products from 2019 to 2023
3.3 Forecast on Sustainability of China's Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products

Selected Charts
Chart Development History of China's Interim Measures for Administration of Import Tariff Quotas for Agricultural Products
Chart Major Sources of China's Corn Imports in 2018
Chart Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Corn
Chart China's Import Tariff Quota for Wheat, 2014-2018
Chart Volume and Value of China's Wheat Imports, 2014-2018
Chart Major Sources of China's Wheat Imports in 2018
Chart Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Wheat
Chart Volume and Value of China's Paddy and Rice Imports, 2014-2018
Chart Major Sources of China's Rice Imports in 2018
Chart Enterprises Granted with 2019 Import Tariff Quota for Rice
Chart China's Import Tariff Quota for Cotton, 2014-2019
Chart Volume and Value of China's Cotton Imports, 2014-2018
Chart Major Sources of China's Cotton Imports in 2018
Chart China's Import Tariff Quota for Sugar, 2014-2019
Chart Volume and Value of China's Sugar Imports, 2014-2018
Chart Major Sources of China's Sugar Imports in 2018
Chart China's Import Tariff Quota for Wool, 2014-2019
Chart Volume and Value of China's Wool Imports, 2014-2018
Chart Major Sources of China's Wool Imports in 2018
Chart China's Import Tariff Quota for Wool Top, 2014-2019
Chart Volume and Value of China's Wool Top Imports, 2014-2018

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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Background research defines the range of products and industries, which proposes the key points of the research. Proper classification will help clients understand the industry and products in the report.

Secondhand material research is a necessary way to push the project into fast progress. The analyst always chooses the data source carefully. Most secondhand data they quote is sourced from an authority in a specific industry or public data source from governments, industrial associations, etc. For some new or niche fields, they also "double-check" data sources and logics before they show them to clients.

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The analyst optimizes the following methods and steps in executing research projects and also forms many special information gathering and processing methods.

1. Analyze the life cycle of the industry to understand the development phase and space.
2. Grasp the key indexes evaluating the market to position clients in the market and formulate development plans
3. Economic, political, social and cultural factors
4. Competitors like a mirror that reflects the overall market and also market differences.
5. Inside and outside the industry, upstream and downstream of the industry chain, show inner competitions
6. Proper estimation of the future is good guidance for strategic planning.


 

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