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Population Health Management Global Market Report

  • ID: 5010741
  • Report
  • January 2020
  • Region: Global
  • 157 Pages
  • LaingBuisson
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FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Amazon
  • Berkshire Hathaway
  • Fitbit
  • Google
  • J P Morgan
  • MORE

The first edition of the new Population Health Management global market report has been published in association with McGrigor Group, leading experts in global health insurance and health management services. With Google’s recent acquisition of Fitbit and the development of ‘Haven’ by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and J P Morgan, never has the issue of population health management been so prominent.

The report is vital reading to anyone - governments, corporates, health and life insurers and reinsurers, healthcare providers, employers and other payers – who have an interest in population health management. This will be especially important as the pressures created by an ageing population and a rise in chronic disease are felt across markets globally, not just in the West. The report covers the key questions and solutions facing the market globally and in its main regional markets today.

Population health management is the current favoured solution to tackling this looming crisis and has been developed over the past 30 years, with the US at the forefront. Between 2015 and 2025, it is expected to grow at a rate of 12% per year with the US providing the greatest short-term revenue opportunity with other markets, including North Asia, Europe and Latin America also showing good growth.

The aim of population health management is to manage health by understanding the full risk and providing tailored solutions for populations holistically, creating collaborative approaches between all players in the market and addressing overall wellbeing rather than physical health alone. As an approach, there has been a measure of trial and error in the development of population health management, underlining that it only really provides return and value on the investment when done properly. The report looks at the top ten lessons based on best practice, from setting a clear long-term strategy to getting programme design right. Focus is also given to the future of population health management, particularly the role of prescriptive data and highlevel technology to enable it to be used on a larger scale. This will be necessary if programmes are to be successful at national scale and move beyond those adopted by corporates, healthcare providers and health insurers. Technology developments will be fundamental in creating interconnectivity with telehealth, e-mobile approaches, big data and the new wearables and sensor technology.

Technology is also widening supplier involvement, led by employee benefits consultancies and global assistance companies and including med-data/med-tech companies, pharmaceuticals and pharmacy, and the sport and food sectors. This breadth of supplier involvement is facilitating consumer engagement in managing their own health which will ultimately transform health into an individually-led industry.

To understand more about this dynamic and growing sector, purchase this report today.

What the report includes

  • Introduction to Population Health Management
  • Drivers of health costs
  • The evolution of the US market
  • The global picture for chronic disease
  • Economic impact of chronic disease globally and by region
  • Economic impact of chronic disease on employers
  • History of Population Health Management
  • Solutions:
    • Services by category
    • Data collection and analysis tools
    • Prevention and education
    • Managed intervention
    • Delivery mechanisms
  • Key lessons learned
  • Key consumers
  • Catalysts for promoting Population Health Management
  • Market opportunity

Who is the report for?

  • Corporates – CSR, CMOs, HR
  • Governments
  • Health and life insurance and re-insurance companies
  • Healthcare providers
  • Hospitals
  • Health maintenance organisations
  • Accountable Care Organisations
  • Integrated Care Partnerships
  • IGOs
  • NGOs
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Amazon
  • Berkshire Hathaway
  • Fitbit
  • Google
  • J P Morgan
  • MORE

LIST OF TABLES

LIST OF FIGURES

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND HIGHLIGHTS  

DEFINING POPULATION HEALTH MANAGEMENT

1. POPULATION AND HEALTH COST        
1.1 Drivers of health costs        
1.2 The US story         
1.3 Chronic disease - the global picture      
1.3.1 Latin America         
1.3.2 Europe         
1.3.3 Russia          
1.3.4 Gulf Cooperation Council       
1.3.5 Africa          
1.3.6 India          
1.3.7 China
1.3.8 South East Asia        
1.3.9 Australia        
1.4 Economic impact overall and by region      
1.5 Economic impact on employers       
1.6 Conclusions to date        

2. HISTORY OF POPULATION HEALTH MANAGEMENT

3. SOLUTION TOOL BOX - WHAT EXISTS AND PROS AND CONS      
3.1 C ategorisation of services
3.2 Data collection and analysis tools       
3.2.1 Health risk assessment       
3.2.2 Physical screening       
3.2.3 Healthcare information technology systems, data management, data analytics software       
3.2.4 Wearables and biosensors (e-health)     
3.2.4.1 Consumer wearables      
3.2.4.2 Physician/healthcare provider oriented e-health  
3.2.4.3 ROI to date and outlook      
3.3  Prevention/education        
3.3.1 Occupational health programmes      
3.3.2 Employee assistance programmes       
3.3.3 Wellness programmes, behavioural change and risk factor management
3.3.3.1 Incentives       
3.3.3.2 Penalties       
3.3.3.3 Conclusions       
3.4 Managed intervention        
3.4.1 Pre-authorisation/Pre-certification/Utilisation review   
3.4.2 Case management       
3.4.3 Condition management       
3.4.4 Telehealth/’m’health for cost reduction/better care    
3.4.5 Pharmacy benefit management/drug adherence   
3.5 Delivery mechanisms        
3.5.1 Collaboration issues       
3.6 Conclusions         

4. SUMMARY OF THE DEBATE - KEY LESSONS       
4.1 Introduction         
4.2 Conclusion: Does PHM work?  Yes, but only if done right   
4.3 What does ‘doing it right’ mean?       
4.4 Lessons          
4.4.1 Lesson 1: Define, understand and commit to a ‘culture’ of health   and wellbeing        
4.4.2 Lesson 2: Establish leadership at all levels, including medical   and non-medical resources      
4.4.3 Lesson 3: Set a multi-year strategic road map with benchmarked  goals, regular measurements and  accountability    
4.4.4 Lesson 4: Establish a best practice programme design and implement it well
4.4.5 Lesson 5: Engage the community to ensure high participation
4.4.6 Lesson 6: Invest in smart incentivisation    
4.4.7 Lesson 7: Recruit, integrate and reward high performing community providers and payers: full system collaboration   
4.4.8 Lesson 8: Harness appropriate technology and utilise data
4.4.9 Lesson 9: All players in the health continuum must play their part    and follow these lessons       

5. KEY CONSUMERS - WHO, WHY AND WHERE?      
5.1 Introduction         
5.2 Overview of buyers
5.2.1 Corporates (private and state owned)    
5.2.2 Governments        
5.2.3 Health and life insurers/re-insurers     
5.2.4 Hospitals, health maintenance organisations, accountable care  organisations and medical practitioners     
5.2.5 Individuals        
5.2.6 Consolidators and advisors      
5.2.7 Healthcare intergovernmental organisations, non-governmental    organisations and foundations      
5.3 Future trends         

6. CATALYSTS - WHO IS PUSHING WELLNESS?      
6.1 Overview of suppliers        
6.1.1 Category 1 - Direct suppliers or health services companies   
6.1.2 Category 2 - ‘Customer-distributor’ hybrids   
6.1.3 Category 3 -Enablers       
6.2 Category 1 – Health service companies      
6.3 Category 2 – Employee benefit consultants      
6.3.1 AON Hewitt        
6.3.2 Buck Consultants       
6.3.3 Mercer         
6.3.4 Towers Watson        
6.3.5 Willis          
6.4 Category 2 – Assistance companies      
6.4.1 International SOS       
6.5 Category 3 – Pharmaceutical companies      
6.5.1 Pfizer         
6.5.2 Sanofi          
6.6 Category 3 – Enablers        
6.6.1 Sodexo         
6.6.2 Walgreens Boots Alliance       
6.6.3 Apple - HealthKit        
6.6.4 Google          
6.6.5 Philips HealthTech       
6.6.6 Siemens        
6.7 Conclusions         

7. MARKET OPPORTUNITY - TODAY AND TO COME      
7.1 PHM market definition/segmentation      
7.2 Workplace wellness market size 2015 - globally and by region  
7.2.1 Global         
7.2.2 Regions         
7.3 PHM sub segments, size, globally and regionally     
7.3.1 IT supplier- based approaches
7.3.2 Retail         
7.3.3 Summary so far        
7.4 Growth trends to date        
7.5 Predicted growth         
7.6 Assessing potential opportunities by segment and region    

APPENDIX 1.  GLOSSARY         

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  • Amazon
  • Berkshire Hathaway
  • Fitbit
  • Google
  • J P Morgan
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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