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Cosmetic Surgery UK Market Report 2ed

  • ID: 5215232
  • Report
  • December 2020
  • Region: United Kingdom
  • 229 Pages
  • LaingBuisson
Demand for Cosmetic Treatments Holds Up in the Face of Coronavirus

The second edition of the Cosmetic Surgery UK market report is essential reading for everyone involved in this cyclically sensitive part of our health economy, be they a provider, a commissioner, an investor, an advisor or a policy maker. Written and researched during the coronavirus pandemic by Liz Heath, the report draws on data collected by the author and also Google Trends to gauge the popularity of different treatments and the emerging trends in this market.

The report not only covers cosmetic surgery, but also non-surgical cosmetic treatments, cosmetic dentistry and, for the first time, hair restoration. There is also an additional chapter dedicated to looking at the impact of Covid-19 on this market.

The publisher estimates that the UK market for cosmetic surgery and treatments was worth around £286 million in 2018. The main payors are individuals paying from their own pockets, prioritising cosmetic treatments over other discretionary spending. Growth has resulted in cosmetic treatments becoming culturally acceptable across all sections of society and more accessible through less expensive non-surgical procedures. There is also a clear trend showing people who have used non-surgical cosmetic treatments as part of their beauty and wellbeing regime opting for surgical procedures at a later date.

The report also includes data that supports the anecdotal evidence that demand for cosmetic procedures is holding up in the face of coronavirus. While surgical procedures were down in the months to August 2020, there has been a surge in demand for non-invasive procedures and Google trend data shows that interest in cosmetic procedures has already returned to its pre-Covid levels.

What the report includes:

  • The impact of Covid-19
  • Markets
  • Cosmetic surgery
  • Cosmetic dentistry
  • Non-surgical cosmetic treatments
  • Hair restoration
  • Politics, regulation and oversight
  • Payors
  • Market insight
  • Investors
  • Market Potential
  • Appendices
  • Glossary
  • Regulators
  • Trade bodies
  • Major providers profiles
  • Procedure price list survey
  • Financial appendix

Who is the report for:

  • Hospital & Clinic C-suite Professionals
  • Specialist Acute Medical Care Providers
  • Specialist Cosmetic Surgery Clinics
  • Dentistry Groups
  • Private Medical Insurance Groups
  • Investors
  • Banks
  • Private Equity
  • Think Tanks
  • Lawyers
  • Management Consultant
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

FOREWORD

LIST OF TABLES

LIST OF FIGURES

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND HIGHLIGHTS

PART ONE

1. COSMETIC SURGERY MARKET
1.1 Definition and history
1.2 The market
1.2.1 UK comparison with global trends
1.2.2 Demand and supply including regional variation
1.3 Funding
1.3. Financing cosmetic surgery
1.4 Demand drivers
1.5 Consumer buying behaviour
1.6 The role of the media
1.7 Marketing cosmetic surgery
1.7.1 Marketing non-surgical cosmetic treatments
1.7.2 Marketing hair restoration surgery
1.7.3 Relevance and value of brands
1.8 Operating and investment models
1.8.1 New market entrants and provider changes
1.9 Key operational statistics and performance measures
1.9. Outcome measures
1.10 Demographics
1. Cosmetic surgery tourism
1.11.1 European standards on cosmetic surgery
1.11.2 European standards on non-surgical medical procedures
1.11.3 The role of agents, brokers and third-party administrators
1.11. The Package Travel Directive
1.11.5 Pricing of cosmetic procedure outside the UK
1.11.6 Insurance for cosmetic surgery in Europe

2. COSMETIC SURGERY POLITICS AND REGULATION
2.1 Scope of independent acute medical care regulation in England
2.2 The essential standards in England
2.3 CQC developments for independent acute hospitals and clinics
2.3.1 The CQC and the cosmetic market
2.3.2 CQC review of cosmetic providers
2.3.3 The Keogh Review– what has changed?
2.3.4 Regulation and oversight – hair restoration
2.4 PHIN and performance data
2.5 The Nuffield Council on Bioethics review
2.5.1 Controls on practitioners
2.5.2 Controls over premises
2.5.3 Controls over products
2.5.4 Young people’s access to cosmetic procedures
2.5. Tackling the wider social context
2.5. Advertising and marketing
2.5. Discrimination
2.6 The role of the Joint Council for Cosmetic Practitioners (JCCP)
2.7 Other regulatory bodies and those providing oversight
2.7.1 The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA)
2.7.2 The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)
2.7.3 The Independent Sector Complaints Adjudication Service (ISCAS)
2.7.4 The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA)
2.8 Quality measures and guidance
2.8. The role of the NHS
2.8.2 The Breast and Cosmetic Implant Registry (BCIR)
2.9 Political oversight and influence
2.10 Quality and good practice guidance
2.11 Training for surgical and non-surgical practice
2.11.1 Training for hair restoration surgery
2.12 Understanding the role of regulation and legislation – the consumer perspective

3. COSMETIC SURGERY PAYORS
3.1 Price comparison for cosmetic surgery procedures

4. COSMETIC SURGERY MARKET INSIGHT
4.1 Overview
4.1.1 Demand and growth
4.1. Market segmentation and demographics
4.1.3 Influencing factors driving consumer demand
4.1.4 Changing role of marketing, advertising and social influence
4.1. The role of regulation
4.1. Future trends
4.1. Surgical and non-surgical training
4.1.7. Surgical training
4.1.7. Non-surgical training
4.1.8 The impact of outbound medical tourism on the UK market
4.2 Cosmetic surgery search analysis
4.2. Breast augmentation
4.2. Breast reduction
4.2. Blepharoplasty ‒ eyelid surgery
4.2. Abdominoplasty
4.2. Rhinoplasty
4.2. Liposuction
4.2. Face lift
4.2.8 Micro-needling, laser skin treatment and facial laser
4.2.9 Dermal fillers and Botulinum Toxin (Botox™)
4.3 Research conclusions
4.4 Major provider profiles

5. COSMETIC SURGERY INVESTORS
5.1 Private equity backed consolidation is accelerating
5.2 Aurelius and The Transform Hospital Group
5.2. Aurelius
5.3 Bluegem Capital Partners and The Private Clinic Group (PCG)
5.3. Bluegem Capital Partners
5.4 TriSpan and Sk:n
5.4. TriSpan
5.6 MYA Clinics and John Ryan 6. COSMETIC SURGERY MARKET POTENTIAL

PART TWO

1. COSMETIC DENTISTRY MARKET
1.1 Definition and history
1.2 Market value
1.3 Demand drivers
1.4 Buying behaviour and demography

2. COSMETIC DENTISTRY POLITICS AND REGULATION
2.1 Scope of independent acute medical care regulation in England
2.2 The consumer and patient perspective

3. PAYORS

4. COSMETIC DENTISTRY MARKET INSIGHT
4. Internet searches for cosmetic dentistry procedures
4.1.1 Dental implants
4.1.2 Dental veneers
4.1. Teeth whitening
4.2 Research conclusions
4.3 Marketing and the role of the media
4.4 Cosmetic dentistry tourism
4.5 Major providers overview
4.6 Operating and investment models
4.6. Performance information

5. COSMETIC DENTISTRY INVESTORS
5.1 Upwards trend
5.2 Market movements and consolidation

6. COSMETIC DENTISTRY MARKET POTENTIAL
6.1 Technology and techniques
6.2 Recruitment and training
6.3 Costs of equipment
6. Pricing

APPENDIX 1. GLOSSARY
APPENDIX 2. BIBLIOGRAPHY
APPENDIX 3. REGULATORS
APPENDIX 4. TRADE BODIES AND ASSOCIATIONS
APPENDIX 5. MAJOR PROVIDERS
APPENDIX 6. COSMETIC SURGERY PRICING SURVEY
APPENDIX 7. FINANCIAL APPENDIX

LIST OF TABLES
Table CV PHIN comparative discharges, UK, 2017‒2019 (including peri-Covid period)
Table ES Breast enlargement average prices, UK, August 2020
Table CS1. Private self-pay spending on acute medical care services in independent sector hospitals and clinics including non-cosmetic and cosmetic split, £m, UK, 2003–20 (and future projections)
Table CS1.2 Number of plastic/cosmetic surgeons by country
Table CS1.3 Age distribution of breast augmentation
Table CS1.4 Comparison of BAAPS, PHIN and ISAPS growth, reported in 2020
Table CS1.5 Comparison of finance schemes provided by major private acute providers
Table CS1.6 Comparison of specialist independent cosmetic provider finance schemes
Table CS1.7 Operating revenues and EBITDAR of full-service providers, UK
Table CS1.8 Operating revenues and EBITDAR of specialist cosmetic surgery providers, UK
Table CS1.9 Age distribution of top cosmetic procedures, global
Table CS2.1 Training and education levels for differing types of treatment
Table CS3.1 Breast enlargement price comparison
Table CS3.2 Liposuction price comparison
Table CS5. Investments in cosmetic surgery, 2005–20
Table CD4.1 Top five leading dental providers by practices and region, UK
Table CD5.1 Major market transactions, 2018‒2020
Table AP6.1 Arm lift
Table AP6.2 Arm lift (mini)
Table AP6.3 Bat/prominent ear surgery (both ears) - Otoplasty
Table AP6.4 Bat/prominent ear surgery (one ear) - Otoplasty
Table AP6.5 Breast correction
Table AP6.6 Breast enlargement
Table AP6.7 Breast reduction
Table AP6.8 Breast uplift
Table AP6.9 Butt uplift
Table AP6.10 Earlobe repair (split) bilateral
Table AP6.11 Earlobe repair (split) uilateral
Table AP6.12 Eyelid reduction (one eyelid) Blepharoplasty
Table AP6.13 Eyelid reduction (full) Blepharoplasty
Table AP6.14 Eyelid reduction (lower eyelids) Blepharoplasty
Table AP6.15 Eyelid reduction (upper eyelids) Blepharoplasty
Table AP6.16 Face lift
Table AP6.17 Face lift (mini)
Table AP6.18 Fat transfer
Table AP6.19 Gynaecomastia (male breast reduction)
Table AP6. Inverted nipple correction
Table AP6. Labia reduction
Table AP6. Laser lipo
Table AP6. Liposuction (one area)
Table AP6. Liposuction (two areas)
Table AP6. Liposuction (three areas)
Table AP6. Liposuction (four areas)
Table AP6. Liposuction (five areas)
Table AP6.28 Neck lift
Table AP6.29 Nose reshaping (Rhinoplasty)
Table AP6. Thigh lift
Table AP6. Tummy tuck (Abdominoplasty)
Table AP6. Tummy tuck (mini) Abdominoplasty
Table AP6.33 Vaser lipo (one area)
Table AP6.34 Vaser lipo (two areas)
Table AP6.35 Vaser lipo (three areas)
Table AP6.36 Vaser lipo (four areas)
Table AP6.37 Vaser lipo (five areas)

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure CV1 Google searches for ‘cosmetic surgery’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CV Impact of Covid-19 on private treatment timing (excluding treatments that have been completed or are far into the future), UK
Figure CV Impact of Covid-19 on treatment spend in the next six months, UK
Figure CV Impact of Covid-19 on return to treatment by treatment type, UK
Figure CV5 Google searches for hair transplant, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CV6 Google searches for ‘cosmetic dentistry’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS1.1 BAAPS Annual Audit results, 2020
Figure CS1.2 Annual growth in plastic surgery procedures reported by BAAPS members, UK,2004–2019
Figure CS1.3 Share of plastic surgery activity carried out by BAAPS members by type of procedure, UK,2011-2019
Figure CS1.4 Distribution of cosmetic surgery activity, UK, 2020
Figure CS1.5 Top ten providers of cosmetic procedures, by discharges, UK
Figure CS1.6 Outbound cosmetic surgery destinations
Figure CS1.7 Ranking of factors in choosing the country
Figure CS1.8 Specific treatment carried out
Figure CS1.9 Who arranged your treatment?
Figure CS2.1 Summary of open complaints by type, January‒September 2020 (JCCP)
Figure CS4.1 Internet searches for ‘breast augmentation’ cf. ‘boob job’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.2 Internet searches for ‘breast reduction’ cf. ‘boob reduction’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.3 Internet searches for ‘blepharoplasty’ cf. ‘eyelid surgery’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.4 Internet searches for ‘abdominoplasty’ cf. ‘tummy tuck’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.5 Internet searches for ‘rhinoplasty’ cf. ‘nose job’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.6 Internet searches for ‘liposuction’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.7 Internet searches for ‘face lift’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.8 Internet searches for ‘micro-needling’ cf. ‘laser skin treatment’ cf. ‘facial laser’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CS4.9 Internet searches for ‘dermal fillers’, ‘Botulinum toxin (Botox™)’, ‘facial fillers’ and ‘lip fillers’, UK, August 2019‒July 2020
Figure CD1.1 Value of dental market, £bn, UK,
Figure CD4.1 Internet searches for ‘cosmetic dentistry’, UK, August 2019–July 2020
Figure CD4.2 Internet searches for ‘dental implants’, UK, August 2019–July 2020
Figure CD4.3 Internet searches for ‘dental veneers’, UK, August 2019–July 2020
Figure CD4.4 Internet searches for ‘teeth whitening’, UK, August 2019–July 2020

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

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