+353-1-416-8900REST OF WORLD
+44-20-3973-8888REST OF WORLD
1-917-300-0470EAST COAST U.S
1-800-526-8630U.S. (TOLL FREE)

PRINTER FRIENDLY

Wireless Communications Systems. An Introduction. Edition No. 1. Wiley - IEEE

  • ID: 5228396
  • Book
  • January 2020
  • 464 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd

A comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of design and applications of wireless communications

Wireless Communications Systems starts by explaining the fundamentals needed to understand, design, and deploy wireless communications systems. The author, a noted expert on the topic, explores the basic concepts of signals, modulation, antennas, and propagation with a MATLAB emphasis. The book emphasizes practical applications and concepts needed by wireless engineers.

The author introduces applications of wireless communications and includes information on satellite communications, radio frequency identification, and offers an overview with practical insights into the topic of multiple input multiple output (MIMO). The book also explains the security and health effects of wireless systems concerns on users and designers. Designed as a practical resource, the text contains a range of examples and pictures that illustrate many different aspects of wireless technology. The book relies on MATLAB for most of the computations and graphics. This important text: 

  • Reviews the basic information needed to understand and design wireless communications systems
  • Covers topics such as MIMO systems, adaptive antennas, direction finding, wireless security, internet of things (IoT), radio frequency identification (RFID), and software defined radio (SDR)
  • Provides examples with a MATLAB emphasis to aid comprehension
  • Includes an online solutions manual and video lectures on selected topics

Written for students of engineering and physics and practicing engineers and scientists, Wireless Communications Systems covers the fundamentals of wireless engineering in a clear and concise manner and contains many illustrative examples.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

Preface xiii

Symbols and Acronyms xv

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Historical Development of Wireless Communications 1

1.2 Information 4

1.3 Wired Communications 7

1.4 Spectrum 9

1.5 Communication System 12

Problems 13

References 15

2 Signals and Bits 17

2.1 Analog Baseband Signals 17

2.2 Digital Baseband Signals 21

2.3 Source Coding 22

2.4 Line Coding 26

2.5 Bandwidth 27

2.6 Signal Level 28

2.7 Noise and Interference 29

2.8 Converting Analog to Digital 36

2.9 Channel Coding 39

2.10 Repetition 40

2.11 Parity Bits 40

2.12 Redundancy Checking 42

2.13 Error Correcting Codes (ECC) 45

2.13.1 Block Codes 45

2.13.2 Convolutional Codes 47

2.14 Interleaving 48

2.15 Eye Diagram 50

2.16 Intersymbol Interference 51

2.17 Raised-Cosine Filter 54

2.18 Equalization 57

Problems 62

References 67

3 Passband Signals 71

3.1 Carrier 71

3.2 Amplitude-Modulated Signals 72

3.3 Frequency-Modulated Signals 80

3.4 Phase-Modulated Signals 84

3.5 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation 90

3.6 Power Spectral Density of Digital Signals 92

3.7 BER of Digital Signals 94

3.8 Multiplexing in Time and Frequency 94

3.8.1 Frequency Division Multiplexing 95

3.8.2 Time Division Multiplexing 96

3.8.3 Multiple Access 97

3.9 Spread Spectrum 100

3.9.1 Interference 101

3.9.2 Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum 101

3.9.3 Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum 103

3.9.4 Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) 104

Problems 106

References 109

4 Antennas 111

4.1 Signal Properties that Influence Antenna Design 111

4.1.1 Impedance 111

4.1.2 Gain 112

4.1.3 Polarization 113

4.1.4 Bandwidth 115

4.2 Common Antennas 116

4.2.1 Point Sources 116

4.2.2 Wire Antennas 117

4.2.3 Aperture Antennas 125

4.2.4 Microstrip Antennas 128

4.3 Antenna Arrays 130

4.3.1 Element Placement 131

4.3.1.1 Linear Array 131

4.3.1.2 Arbitrary Array Layouts 134

4.4 Electronic Beam Steering 136

4.5 Element Pattern 137

4.6 Low Sidelobes 138

4.7 Moving a Null to Reject Interference 140

4.8 Null Filling 142

4.9 Multiple Beams 144

4.10 Antennas for Wireless Applications 146

4.10.1 Handset Antennas 146

4.10.2 Cellular Base Station Antennas 151

4.10.3 Reflector Antennas 156

4.10.4 Antennas for Microwave Links 159

4.11 Diversity 162

4.11.1 Spatial Diversity 162

4.11.2 Frequency Diversity 165

4.11.3 Polarization Diversity 165

4.11.4 Time Diversity 166

Problems 166

References 170

5 Propagation in the Channel 173

5.1 Free Space Propagation 174

5.2 Reflection and Refraction 175

5.3 Multipath 179

5.4 Antennas over the Earth 181

5.5 Earth Surface 186

5.6 Diffraction 190

5.6.1 Fresnel Diffraction 190

5.6.2 Diffraction from Multiple Obstacles 194

5.6.3 Geometrical Theory of Diffraction 198

5.7 Signal Fading 202

5.7.1 Small-Scale Fading Models 205

5.7.1.1 Rayleigh Fading 205

5.7.1.2 Rician Fading 209

5.7.2 Approximate Channel Models 212

5.7.3 Large-Scale Fading 214

5.7.4 Channel Ray-Tracing Models 217

5.8 Doppler Effects 219

5.9 Fade Margin 223

5.10 Atmospheric Propagation 224

Problems 234

References 238

6 Satellite Communications 241

6.1 Early Development of Satellite Communications 241

6.2 Satellite Orbits 245

6.3 Satellite Link Budget 254

6.4 Bent Pipe Architecture 259

6.5 Multiple Beams 259

6.6 Stabilization 261

Problems 262

References 263

7 RFID 267

7.1 Historical Development 267

7.2 RFID System Overview 270

7.3 Tag Data 273

7.4 Tag Classes 274

7.4.1 Passive Tags 274

7.4.2 Tags with Batteries or Supercapacitors 277

7.4.2.1 Semi-Passive Tags 277

7.4.2.2 Active Tags 278

7.5 Data Encoding and Modulation 279

7.6 Reader-Tag Communication 281

7.6.1 Near Field 281

7.6.2 Far Field 285

7.6.2.1 Multiple Readers in an Interrogation Zone 285

7.6.2.2 Backscatter Communication 288

7.6.2.3 Chipless Tags 293

Problems 295

References 296

8 Direction Finding 301

8.1 Direction Finding with a Main Beam 301

8.1.1 Array Output Power 302

8.1.2 Periodogram 304

8.1.3 Wullenweber Array 305

8.2 Direction Finding with a Null 307

8.3 Adcock Arrays 308

8.4 Eigenbeams 310

8.5 Direction Finding Algorithms 313

8.5.1 Capon’s Minimum Variance 313

8.5.2 Pisarenko Harmonic Decomposition 315

8.5.3 MUSIC Algorithm 316

8.5.4 Root MUSIC 317

8.5.5 Maximum Entropy Method 318

8.5.6 ESPRIT 319

8.5.7 Estimating and Finding Sources 321

Problems 322

References 322

9 Adaptive Arrays 325

9.1 The Need for Adaptive Nulling 325

9.2 Beam Cancellation 327

9.3 Optimum Weights 328

9.4 Least Mean Square (LMS) Algorithm 329

9.5 Sample Matrix Inversion Algorithm 332

9.6 Adaptive Algorithms Based on Power Minimization 334

9.6.1 Random Search Algorithms 335

9.6.2 Output Power Minimization Algorithms 338

9.6.3 Beam Switching 340

9.6.4 Reconfigurable Antennas 340

Problems 342

References 342

10 MIMO 345

10.1 Types of MIMO 345

10.2 The Channel Matrix 349

10.3 Recovering the Transmitted Signal Using the Channel Matrix 352

10.3.1 CSIR and CSIT 352

10.3.2 Waterfilling Algorithm 356

10.3.3 CSIR and No CSIT 360

Problems 361

References 362

11 Security 365

11.1 Wireless Networks 365

11.1.1 Addresses on a Network 365

11.1.2 Types of Wireless Local Area Networks 367

11.1.3 WLAN Examples 370

11.2 Threats 373

11.3 Securing Data 376

11.3.1 Cryptography 376

11.3.2 Secret Key Cryptography 379

11.3.3 Public Key Cryptography 379

11.3.4 Hashing 380

11.4 Defenses 381

Problems 384

References 385

12 Biological Effects of RF Fields 389

12.1 RF Heating 389

12.2 RF Dosimetry 393

12.3 RF Radiation Hazards 396

12.3.1 Base Stations 397

12.3.2 Cell Phones 397

12.3.3 Medical Tests 397

12.4 Modeling RF Interactions with Humans 398

12.5 Harmful Effects of RF Radiation 400

Problems 400

References 401

Appendix A MATLAB Tips 405

A.1 Introduction 405

A.2 Plotting Hint 406

Appendix B OSI Layers 407

B.1 Layer 1: Physical 407

B.2 Layer 2: Data Link 407

B.3 Layer 3: Network 407

B.4 Layer 4: Transport 408

B.5 Layer 5: Session 408

B.6 Layer 6: Presentation 408

B.7 Layer 7: Application 409

Appendix C Cellular Generations 411

References 412

Appendix D Bluetooth 413

References 414

Appendix E Wi-Fi 415

References 416

Appendix F Software-Defined Radios 419

F.1 SDR Basics 419

F.2 SDR Hardware 421

F.3 SDR Software 422

F.4 Cognitive Radio 423

References 423

Index 425

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Randy L. Haupt University of Nevada, Reno.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll