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Global Cord Blood and Tissue Banking Industry Report 2021

  • ID: 5232567
  • Report
  • November 2021
  • Region: Global
  • 223 Pages
  • BioInformant
Today, more than 70% of the global cord blood market is controlled by the world’s 12 largest cord blood banking operators

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • AllCells
  • Cells4Life Group, LLP
  • Cord Tissue
  • Global Collaboration
  • NextGen Collection System
  • Search & Match Service

Today, more than 70% of the global cord blood market is controlled by the world’s 12 largest cord blood banking operators. For both therapeutic and financial reasons, the cord blood industry has been witnessing record levels of merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in recent years, with market leaders gaining market share at the expense of smaller competitors and investors vying for buy-in opportunities. Novel pricing strategies, product cross-sells and upsells, and ingenious online and offline marketing strategies are being implemented by the industry’s market leaders. Meanwhile, new technologies to support ex vivo cord blood expansion are advancing at brisk pace.


Substantial cord blood industry consolidation has happened in recent years and investor appetite for cord blood banks has never been stronger. This is because cord blood banks produce stable subscription revenue from long-term storage contracts. At a fundamental level, cord blood banks are both a real estate play (cryogenic storage facilities) and a regenerative medicine (RM) play.


In addition to an aggressive M&A environment, a growing number of cord blood banks have been venturing into new types of stem cell storage, reproductive services, and related cell therapy applications. Specifically, cord blood, cord tissue, placental tissue, and dental pulp have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic promise, causing storage services for these biomaterials to proliferate.


Cord blood has the potential to be an important source of therapeutic cells for a growing range of regenerative medicine applications. There are over 1,300 clinical trials evaluating the use of cord blood stem and progenitor cells. These studies use unmanipulated whole cord blood (total nucleated cells/TNC), mononuclear cells (MNC), or cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These studies are targeting clinical indications that range from pulmonary diseases to infertility to orthopedic conditions, but the most common area of research is neurologic conditions - such as cerebral palsy, autism, stroke, and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.


Within the research realm, cord blood products (fresh and cryopreserved) are being offered by a diverse range of major market leaders, including Lonza, STEMCELL Technologies, AllCells, and dozens of others. Within the therapeutic realm, a growing number of companies are exploring the development and commercialization of perinatal products across a diverse range of applications.


The report provides the following details:

  • Number of cord blood units cryopreserved in public and private cord blood banks globally
  • Number of hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) globally using cord blood cells
  • Utilization of cord blood cells in clinical trials for developing regenerative medicines
  • The decline of the utilization of cord blood cells in HSC transplantations since 2005
  • Emerging technologies to influence financial sustainability of public cord blood banks
  • The future scope for companion products from cord blood
  • The changing landscape of cord blood cell banking market
  • Extension of services by cord blood banks
  • Types of cord blood banks
  • Economic model of public cord blood banks
  • Cost analysis for public cord blood banks
  • Economic model of private cord blood banks
  • Cost analysis for private cord blood banks
  • Profit margins for private cord blood banks
  • Pricing for processing and storage in private banks
  • Rate per cord blood unit in the U.S. and Europe
  • Indications for the use of cord blood-derived HSCs for transplantations
  • Diseases targeted by cord blood-derived MSCs in regenerative medicine
  • Cord blood processing technologies
  • Number of clinical trials, number of published scientific papers and NIH funding for cord blood research
  • Transplantation data from different cord blood registries

Key questions answered within the report are:

  • What are the strategies being considered to improve the financial stability of public cord blood banks?
  • What are the companion products proposed to be developed from cord blood?
  • How much is spent to process and store a unit of cord blood?
  • How much does a unit of cryopreserved cord blood unit fetch on release?
  • Why do most public cord blood banks incur a loss?
  • What is the net profit margin for a private cord blood bank?
  • What are the prices for processing and storage of cord blood in private cord blood banks?
  • What are the rates per cord blood units in the U.S. and Europe?
  • What are the revenues from cord blood sales for major cord blood banks?
  • Which are the different accreditation systems for cord blood banks?
  • What are the comparative merits of the various cord blood processing technologies?
  • What is to be done to increase the rate of utilization of cord blood cells in transplantations?
  • Which TNC counts are preferred for transplantation?
  • What is the number of registered clinical trials using cord blood and cord tissue?
  • How many clinical trials are studying the ex vivo expansion of cord blood?
  • How many matching and mismatching transplantations using cord blood units are performed on an annual basis?
  • What is the share of cord blood transplants compared to bone marrow and peripheral blood transplants from 2000 to 2021?
  • What is the likelihood of finding a matching allogeneic cord blood unit by ethnicity?
  • Which are the top ten countries for donating cord blood?
  • What are the diseases targeted by cord blood and tissue derived MSCs within clinical trials?
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • AllCells
  • Cells4Life Group, LLP
  • Cord Tissue
  • Global Collaboration
  • NextGen Collection System
  • Search & Match Service

Report Overview
Statement of the Report
Executive Summary
Introduction
Cord Blood: An Alternative Source for HPSCs
Utilization of Cord Blood Cells in Clinical Trials
the Struggle of Cord Blood Banks
Emerging Technologies to Influence the Financial Sustainability of Banks
Other Opportunities to Improve Financial Stability
Scope for Companion Products
Changing Landscape of Cord Blood Cell Banking Market by Geography
Extension of Services by Cord Blood Banks
Cord Blood Industry: As of Today
Diversification of Services
Pairing with Genetic Testing Services
Pairing with Fertility and Assisted Reproduction Services
Cord Blood Industry Consolidation
Cord Blood Banks as Integrated therapeutic Companies


Cord Blood & Cord Blood Banking: An Overview
Cord Blood Banking (Stem Cell Banking)
Public Cord Blood Banks
Economic Model of Public Cord Blood Banks
Cost Analysis for Public Banks
Relationship between Costs and Release Rates
Private Cord Blood Banks
Cost Analysis for Private Cord Blood Banks
Economic Model of Private Banks
Hybrid Cord Blood Banks
Global Private Cord Blood Banking: Market Leaders
Comparing Cord Blood Banks
Cord Blood Banks in the U.S.
Proportion of Public, Private and Hybrid Banks in U.S.
Percent Share of Parents of Newborns Storing Cord Blood by Country/Region
Pricing for Processing and Storage in Commercial Banks
Rate per Cord Blood Unit in the U.S. and Europe
Cord Blood Revenues for Major Cord Blood Banks


Cord Blood Bank Accreditations
American Association of Blood Banks (AABB)
Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular therapy (FACT)
FDA Registration
FDA Biologics License Application (BLA) License
Investigational New Drug (IND) for Cord Blood
Human Tissue Authority (HTA)
therapeutic Goods Act (TGA) in Australia
International NetCord Foundation
AABB Accredited Cord Blood Facilities
FACT Accreditation for Cord Blood Banks


Applications of Cord Blood Cells
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantations with Cord Blood Cells
Umbilical Cord Cells in Regenerative Medicine


Cord Blood Processing Technologies
the Process of Separation
PrepaCyte-CB
Advantages of PrepaCyte-CB
Treatment Outcomes with PrepaCyte-CB
Hetastarch (HES)
AutoXpress (AXP)
SEPAX
Plasma Depletion Method (MaxCell Process)
Density Gradient Method
Comparative Merits of Different Processing Methods
Early Stage HSC Recovery by Technologies
Mid Stage HSC (CD34+/CD133+) Recovery from Cord Blood
Late Stage Recovery of HSCs from Cord Blood
HSC (CD45+) Recovery
Days to Neutrophil Engraftment by Technology
Anticoagulants used in Cord Blood Processing
Type of Anticoagulant and Cell Recovery Volume
Percent Cell Recovery by Sample Size
TNC Viability by Time Taken for Transport and Type of Anticoagulant
Cryopreservation of Cord Blood Cells
Bioprocessing of Umbilical Cord Tissue (UCT)
A Proposal to Improve the Utilization Rate of Banked Cord Blood


Cord Blood Clinical Trials, Scientific Publications & NIH Funding  
Cord Blood Cells for Research
Cord Blood Cells for Clinical Trials
Number of Clinical Trials involving Cord Blood Cells
Number of Clinical Trials using Cord Blood Cells by Geography
Number of Clinical Trials by Study Type
Number of Clinical Trials by Study Phase
Number of Clinical Trials by Funder Type
Clinical Trials Addressing Indications in Children
Select Three Clinical Trials Involving Children
Sensorineural Hearing Loss (NCT02038972)
Autism Spectrum (NCT02847182)
Cerebral Palsy (NCT01147653)
Clinical Trials for Neurological Diseases using Cord Blood and Cord Tissue
UCB for Diabetes
UCB in Cardiovascular Clinical Trials
Cord Blood Cells for Auto-Immune Diseases in Clinical Trials
Cord Tissue Cells for Orthopedic Disorders in Clinical Trials
Cord Blood Cells for Other Indications in Clinical Trials
Major Diseases Addressed by Cord Blood Cells in Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials using Cord Tissue-Derived MSCs
Ongoing Clinical Trials using Cord Tissue
Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Geography
Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Phase
Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Sponsor Types
Companies Sponsoring Trials using Cord Tissue-Derived MSCs
Wharton’s Jelly-Derived MSCs in Clinical Trials
Wharton’s Jelly-Based Clinical Trials by Phase
Companies Sponsoring Wharton’s Jelly-Based Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials Involving Cord Blood Expansion Studies
Safe and Feasible Expansion Protocols
List of Clinical Trials involved in the Expansion of Cord Blood HSCs
Expansion Technologies
Scientific Publications on Cord Blood
Scientific Publications on Cord Tissue
Scientific Publications on Wharton’s Jelly-Derived MSCs
Published Scientific Papers on Cord Blood Cell Expansion
NIH Funding for Cord Blood Research


Parent’s Awareness and Attitude Towards Cord Blood Banking
Undecided Expectant Parents
the Familiar Cord Blood Banks Known by the Expectant Parents
Factors Influencing the Choice of a Cord Blood Bank


Cord Blood: As A Transplantation Medicine
Comparisons of Cord Blood to other Allograft Sources
Major Indications for HCTs in the U.S.
Trends in Allogeneic HCT in the U.S. by Recipient Age
Trends in Autologous HCT in the U.S. by Recipient Age
HCTs by Cell Source in Adult Patients
Transplants by Cell Source in Pediatric Patients
Allogeneic HCTs by Cell Source
Unrelated Donor Allogeneic HCTs in Patients <18 Years
Likelihood of Finding an Unrelated Cord Blood Unit by Ethnicity
Likelihood of Finding an Unrelated Cord Blood Unit for Patients <20 Years
Odds of using a Baby’s Cord Blood
Cord Blood Utilization Trends
Number of Cord Blood Donors Worldwide
Number of CBUs Stored Worldwide
Number of CBUs, PBSCs and BMCs Shipped
Cord Blood Donors by Geography
Public Cord Blood Units Stored in Different Geographies
Number of Donors by HLA Typing
Searches Made by Transplant Patients for Donors/CBUs
Types of CBU Shipments (Single/Double/Multi)
TNC Count of CBUs Shipped for Children and Adult Patients
Shipment of Multiple CBUs
Percent Supply of CBUs for National and International Patients
Decreasing Number of CBU Utilization
Top Ten Countries in Cord Blood Donation
HLA Typed CBUs by Continent
Percentage TNC of Banked CBUs
Total Number of CBUs, HLA-Typed Units by Country
Cord Blood Export/Import by E.U. Member States
Number of Donors and CBUs in Europe
Number of Exports/Imports of CBUs in E.U.
Global Exchange of Cord Blood Units


Cord Blood Cells As therapeutic Cell Products In Cell therapy
MSCs from Cord Blood and Cord Tissue
Potential Neurological Applications of Cord Blood-Derived Cells
Cord Tissue-Derived MSCs for therapeutic use
Indications Targeted by UCT-MSCs in Clinical Trials
Current Consumption of Cord Blood Units by Clinical Trials
Leading Cord Blood Stem Cell Treatments in Clinical Trials
the following sections present leading cord blood stem cell treatments that are now being tested in formal clinical trials.
Acquired Hearing Loss (NCT02038972)
Autism (NCT02847182)
Cerebral Palsy (NCT03087110)
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (NCT01856049)
Type 1 Diabetes (NCT00989547)
Psoriasis (NCT03765957)
Parkinson’s Disease (NCT03550183)
Signs of Aging (NCT04174898)
Stroke (NCT02433509)
Traumatic Brain Injury (NCT01451528)


Market Analysis: Market Size, Segementation, and 5-Year Forecast
Public vs. Private Cord Blood Banking Market
Cord Blood Banking Market by Indication


Profiles of Select Cord Blood Banks
AllCells
Whole Blood
Leukopak
Mobilized Leukopak
Bone Marrow
Cord Blood
AlphaCord LLC
NextGen Collection System
Americord Registry, Inc.
Cord Blood 2.0
Cord Tissue
Placental Tissue 2.0
Be the Match
Hub of Transplant Network
Partners of Be the Match
Allogeneic Cell Sources in Be the Match Registry
Likelihood of a Matched Donor on Be the Match by Ethnic Background
Biocell Center Corporation
Chorionic villi after Delivery
Amniotic Fluid and Chorionic Villi during Pregnancy
BioEden Group, Inc.
Differences between Tooth Cells and Umbilical Cord Cells
Biovault Family
Personalized Cord Blood Processing
Cell Care
Cells4Life Group, LLP
Cells4Life’s pricing
TotiCyte Technology
Cord Blood Releases
Cell-Save
Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR)
Global Collaboration
Scientific Working Committees
Medicare Clinical Trials and Studies
Cellular therapy
Cord Blood Center Group
Cord Blood Units Released
Cordlife Group, Ltd.
Cordlife’s Cord Blood Release Track Record
Core23 Biobank
Cord Blood Registry (CBR)
Cordlife Group, Ltd.
CordVida
Crioestaminal
Cord Blood Transplantation in Portugal
Cryo-Cell International, Inc.
Processing Method
Financial Results of the Company
Cryo-Cell International’s Pricing
CryoHoldco
Cryoviva Biotech Pvt. Ltd
European Society for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation (EBMT
EBMT Transplant Activity
FamiCord Group
GeneCell International
Global Cord Blood Corporation (GCBC)
the Company’s Business
HealthBaby Hong Kong
BioArchive System Service Plan
MVE Liquid Nitrogen System
HEMAFUND
Insception Lifebank
LifebankUSA
Placental Banking
LifeCell International Pvt. Ltd.
MiracleCord, Inc.
Maze Cord Blood Laboratories
New England Cord Blood Bank, Inc.
New York Cord Blood Center (NYBC)
Products
Laboratory Services
PacifiCord
FDA-Approved Sterile Collection Bags
AXP Processing System
BioArchive System
ReeLabs Pvt. Ltd.
Smart Cells International, Ltd.
Stem Cell Cryobank
StemCyte, Inc.
StemCyte Sponsored Clinical Trials
Spinal Cord Injury Phase II
Other Trials
Transcell Biolife
ScellCare
ToothScell
ViaCord
Vita 34 AG
World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA)
Search & Match Service
Worldwide Network for Blood & Marrow Transplantation (WBMT)


List of Figures
Figure 2.1: Profit Margins of Select Private Cord Blood Banks, 2017-
Figure 2.2: U.S. Cord Blood Banks by Size of Inventory
Figure 2.3: Proportion of Public, Private and Hybrid Banks in U.S.
Figure 2.4: Percent Share of Parents of Newborns Storing Cord Blood by Country/Region
Figure 2.5: Cord Blood Revenues for Companies, 2017-
Figure 3.1: Percent Share of AABB Accredited Cord Blood Facilities by Country
Figure 5.1: Separation of Buffy Layer
Figure 5.2: PrepaCyte-CB
Figure 5.3: Hetastarch (HES)
Figure 5.4: AutoXpress II
Figure 5.5: SEPAX 
Figure 5.6: Plasma Depletion (PD) Method (MaxCell Process)
Figure 5.7: Density Gradient Separation of Cord Blood
Figure 5.8: Early Stage HSC Recovery from Cord Blood by Technologies
Figure 5.9: Mid Stage HSC (CD34+/CD133+) Recovery from Cord Blood by Technologies
Figure 5.10: Late Stage HSC Recovery from Cord Blood by Technologies
Figure 5.11: HSC (CD45+) Recovery Post Process from Whole Blood by Technologies
Figure 5.12: Days to Neutrophil Engraftment by Technology
Figure 5.13: Difference in TNC Recovery among Anticoagulants
Figure 5.14: Type of Anticoagulant and Cell Recovery Volume
Figure 5.15: Percent Cell Recovery by Sample Size
Figure 5.16: TNC Viability by Time Taken for Transport
Figure 5.17: Difference in Recovery of Viable TNC after Thawing
Figure 5.18: CD34+ Cell Count, CFU and Cell Apoptosis by Cryoprotectants
Figure 5.19: the Number of Stored and Transplanted CB Units in Korea-CORD by TNC
Figure 5.20: Number of Stored and Shipped CB Units and Utilization Rate by TNC Count
Figure 6.1: # of Cord Blood Clinical Trials as Reported in PubMed.gov (2000 to 2020)
Figure 6.2: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Geography as of June 
Figure 6.3: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Study Type as of June 
Figure 6.4: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Study Phase as of June 
Figure 6.5: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Funder Type as of June 
Figure 6.6: Percent Share of Indications in Children tested in Clinical Trials
Figure 6.7: Percent Share of Diseases in Ongoing Clinical Trials using Cord Blood Cells
Figure 6.8: Percent Share of Diseases in Clinical Trials using MSCs from Cord Tissue
Figure 6.9: Number of Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Geography as of June 
Figure 6.10: Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Study Phase as of June 
Figure 6.11: Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Funder Type as of June 
Figure 6.12: Wharton’s Jelly-Based Clinical Trials by Study Phase as of June 
Figure 6.13: Number of Published Scientific Papers on UCB, 2000-June 2
Figure 6.14: Number of Published Scientific Papers on Cord Tissue, 2000-June 2
Figure 6.15: Number of Published Scientific Papers on Wharton’s Jelly, 2000-June 2
Figure 6.16: Number of Published Scientific Papers on CB Expansion, 2000-June 2
Figure 7.1: Percent of Expectant Parents Who Have Heard About Cord Blood Banking
Figure 7.2: Undecided Expectant Parents about Cord Blood Banking
Figure 7.3: Brand Name Recognition of Cord Blood Banks by Expectant Parents
Figure 7.4: Factors Influencing the Choice of a Cord Blood Bank
Figure 8.1: Distribution of Cell Sources in HCTs as Reported in Be the Match
Figure 8.2: Comparisons of Cord Blood to other Allograft Sources
Figure 8.3: Major Indications for HTC in the U.S.
Figure 8.4: Trend in Allogeneic HCT in the U.S. by Recipient Age, 2000 to Present
Figure 8.5: Trends in Autologous HCT in the U.S. by Recipient Age, 2000 to Present 
Figure 8.6: Transplants by Cell Source in Adult Patients, 2010 to Present 
Figure 8.7: Transplants by Cell Source in Pediatric Patients <18 Years
Figure 8.8: Allogeneic HCTs by Cell Source Facilitated by NMDP/Be the Match
Figure 8.9: Unrelated Donor Allogeneic HCTs in Patients <18 Years/NMDP/Be the Match
Figure 8.10: Likelihood of Finding an Unrelated Cord Blood Unit by Ethnicity
Figure 8.11: Likelihood of Finding an Unrelated Cord Blood Unit for Patients <20 Years
Figure 8.12: Cumulative Probability of having a Stem Cell Transplant by Age
Figure 8.13: Cord Blood Utilization Trends
Figure 8.14: Number of UCB Donors Worldwide as Reported by WMDA, 2000-2
Figure 8.15: Number of CBUs Worldwide as Reported by WMDA, 2000-2
Figure 8.16: Unrelated BM, PBPC and CB Shipped, 2000-2
Figure 8.17: Number of Umbilical Cord Blood Donors by Geography
Figure 8.18: Public Cord Blood Units Stored by Geography as Reported by the WMDA
Figure 8.19: Percent Shares of all Registered Donors by HLA Typing Level
Figure 8.20: Number of Searches Initiated by National Patients for Donors/CBU/Both
Figure 8.21: Types of CBU Shipments
Figure 8.22: TNC Count of CBUs Provided for Children and Adult Patients - Single
Figure 8.23: TNC Count of CBUs Provided for Children and Adult Patients - Multi
Figure 8.24: Percentage of HPC Products Provided for National and International Patients
Figure 8.25: Percentage of CB Units Provided for National and International Patients
Figure 8.26: Top Ten Countries with Number of Donors Listed per 10,000 Inhabitants
Figure 8.27: Percentage of HLA Typed CBUs Banked per Continent
Figure 8.28: Percentage TNC of Banked CBUs
Figure 8.29: Number of Donors per 10,000 Inhabitants by Select E.U. Countries
Figure 8.30: Global Exchange of Cord Blood Units, 2
Figure 8.30: Global Shipments of CBUs by Geography in 2
Figure 9.1: Percent Shares of Indications Targeted by UCB-MSCs in Clinical Trials
Figure 9.2: Percent Share of Clinical Indications using UCT-MSCs
Figure 9.3: Number of UCB Units Released by Cord Blood Registry by Application
Figure 10.1: Global Cord Blood Banking Market Revenue by Geography, 2020-2
Figure 10.2: Percent Share of Global Cord Blood Banking Market Revenue by Geography
Figure 10.3: Percent Share of Global Cord Blood Banking Market, Public vs. Private
Figure 10.4: Percent Share of Cord Blood Banking Market by Indication
Figure 11.1: Growth of CBUs on the Be the Match Registry, 2001-2
Figure 11.2: Diversity of CBUs on Be the Match Registry, 2
Figure 11.3: Number of CBUs on Be the Match Registry by Race and Ethnicity, 2
Figure 11.4: Diversity of CBUs in Be the Match Registry
Figure 11.5: Cell Sources for Allogeneic HCT Facilitated by Be the Match Registry
Figure 11.6: Likelihood of a Matched Donor on Be the Match Registry by Ethnicity
Figure 11.7: Percent Recovery of Viable Cells by TotiCyte Technology
Figure 11.8: Growth in Number of New Transplant Patients Registered with the CIBMTR
Figure 11.9: New Patients per Year Registered with CIBMTR
Figure 11.10: Transplant Patients by Graft Source Registered with CIBMTR
Figure 11.11: Number of Cord Blood Units Stored in CBR and its Competitors
Figure 11.12: Key Figures of Sales Revenues and Gross Profits for Cordlife, 2014-2
Figure 11.13: Cryo-Cell International’s Revenues, 2016 to Present 
Figure 11.14: Revenue and Gross Profit for GCBC, 2015-2
Figure 11.15: Percent Share of Units Released by Indication
Figure 11.16: Key Figures of Sales Revenues & Gross Profits for Vita 34, 2014 to Present 
Figure 11.17: Search Types in WMDA Search & Match Service, 2017-2


List of Tables
Table 2.1: An Overview of Public Cord Blood Banks
Table 2.2: International Prices of Cord Blood Unit
Table 2.3: Prices of Cord Blood Units in NMDP Banks in the U.S.
Table 2.4: An Overview of Private Cord Blood Banks
Table 2.5: Profit Margins of Select Private Cord Blood Banks, 2017-
Table 2.6: An Overview of Hybrid Cord Blood Banks
Table 2.7: World’s 12 Largest Private Cord Blood Bank Operators
Table 2.8: Comparison of Three Largest Private Banks in U.S.
Table 2.9: List of Public, Private and Hybrid Cord Blood Banks in the U.S.
Table 2.10: Pricing for Storage in Commercial Banks
Table 2.11: Rate per Cord Blood Unit in the U.S. & Europe
Table 2.12: Cord Blood Revenues for Major Four Companies, 2017-
Table 3.1: AABB Accredited Cord Blood Facilities
Table 3.2: Select FACT Accredited Cord Blood Facilities
Table 4.1: Indications for the Use of UCB-Derived Stem Cells for Transplantation
Table 4.2: Indications for the Use of UCB-Derived Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine
Table 5.1: Advantages of PrepaCyte-CB
Table 5.2: Treatment Outcomes with PrepaCyte-CB
Table 6.1: U.S. Cord Blood Banks Supplying Cord Blood for Research
Table 6.2: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Geography as of June 
Table 6.3: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Study Type as of June 
Table 6.4: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Study Phase as of June 
Table 6.5: Number of Cord Blood Clinical Trials by Funder Type as of June 
Table 6.6: Percent Share of Indications in Children tested in Clinical Trials
Table 6.7: Select Three Clinical Trials involving Children
Table 6.8: Ongoing Clinical Trials using UCB for Neurological Diseases
Table 6.9: Ongoing Clinical Trials using UCB for Diabetes
Table 6.10: Ongoing Clinical Trials using UCB for Cardiovascular Trials
Table 6.11: Ongoing Clinical Trials using UCB for Auto-Immune Diseases
Table 6.12: Ongoing Clinical Trials using UCB for Orthopedic Disorders
Table 6.13: Ongoing Clinical Trials using UCB for Other Indications
Table 6.14: Select Clinical Trials using MSCs from Cord Tissue
Table 6.15: Number of Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Geography as of June 
Table 6.16: Number of Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Study Phase as of June 
Table 6.17: Number of Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Funder Type as of June 
Table 6.18: Select Cord Tissue-Based Clinical Trials by Commercial Entities, 
Table 6.19: Wharton’s Jelly-Based Clinical Trials by Phase, June 
Table 6.20: Wharton’s Jelly-Based Clinical Trials by Commercial Entities, June 
Table 6.21: Clinical Trials in Cord Blood-Derived Cell Expansion by Country, 
Table 6.22: Clinical Trials of Cell Expansion Studies by Stages in Development, 2
Table 6.23: Twenty Clinical Trials involved in the Expansion of Cord Blood HSCs
Table 6.24: Cord Blood Expansion Approaches
Table 6.25: Select NIH Funding for Umbilical Cord Blood Research, 2019-2
Table 8.1: Comparisons of Cord Blood to other Allograft Sources in Transplantation
Table 8.2: Number of HCTs Performed in the U.S. as reported to CIBMTR by Disease
Table 8.3: No. of Cord Blood Units Available Worldwide According to WMDA, 1997-2
Table 8.4: Unrelated BM, PBPC and CB Shipped, 1997-2
Table 8.5: Total Number of Cord Blood Donors and Cord Blood Units by Country
Table 8.6: Number of Donors and CBUs by E.U. Country as of December 31, 2
Table 8.7: Number of Exports/Imports of CBUs in E.U. in 2
Table 9.1: Select 15 Clinical Trials Using Cord Blood-Derived MSCs as Interventions
Table 9.2: Select Clinical Trials using UCT-MSCs as Interventions
Table 10.1: Global Cord Blood Banking Market Revenue by Geography, 2020-2
Table 11.1: AlphaCord’s pricing
Table 11.2: Growth of Cord Blood Units in Be the Match Registry, 2001-2
Table 11.3: Diversity of CBUs on Be the Match Registry, 2
Table 11.4: Number of CBUs on Be the Match Registry by Race and Ethnicity, 2
Table 11.5: Cell Care’s pricing for Processing and Storage
Table 11.6: Cells4Life’s pricing for Cord Blood, Cord Tissue, Amnion and Placental Cells
Table 11.7: Cord Blood and Cord Tissue Products Released from Cells4Life
Table 11.8: Distribution of Transplant Patients by Graft Source Registered with CIBMTR
Table 11.9: Distribution of Transplant Patients by Indication Registered with CIBMTR
Table 11.10: Cord Blood Units Released from Cord Blood Center Group
Table 11.11: Cordlife’s Cord Blood Release Track Record
Table 11.12: Core23 Biobank’s Processing and Storage Fees
Table 11.13: Cryo-Cell International’s Revenues, 2016-2
Table 11.14: Cryo-Cell International’s Pricing for Processing and Storage
Table 11.15: Allogeneic and Autologous Infusions by Indication Reported in EBMT
Table 11.16: GeneCell Internationals Prepaid Storage Plans
Table 11.17: Selected Financial Data for GCBC, 2015-2
Table 11.18: Insception Lifebank’s Pricing
Table 11.19: LifeCell International’s pricing
Table 11.20: MiracleCord’s Cost Comparison with Competitors
Table 11.21: Maze Cord Blood Laboratory’s Payment Plans
Table 11.22: Comparison of Pricing of NECBB with others
Table 11.23: Stem Cell Cryobank’s pricing for Processing and Storage
Table  11.24: Search Types in WMDA Search & Match Service, 2017-2


 


Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
  • AllCells
  • Allogeneic Cell Sources in Be the Match Registry
  • AlphaCord LLC
  • Americord Registry, Inc.
  • Amniotic Fluid and Chorionic Villi during Pregnancy
  • AXP Processing System
  • Be the Match
  • BioArchive System
  • BioArchive System Service Plan
  • Biocell Center Corporation
  • BioEden Group, Inc.
  • Biovault Family
  • Bone Marrow
  • Cell Care
  • Cells4Life Group, LLP
  • Cells4Life’s pricing
  • Cell-Save
  • Cellular therapy
  • Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR)
  • Chorionic villi after Delivery
  • Cord Blood
  • Cord Blood 2.0
  • Cord Blood Center Group
  • Cord Blood Registry (CBR)
  • Cord Blood Releases
  • Cord Blood Transplantation in Portugal
  • Cord Blood Units Released
  • Cord Tissue
  • Cordlife Group, Ltd.
  • Cordlife’s Cord Blood Release Track Record
  • CordVida
  • Core23 Biobank
  • Crioestaminal
  • Cryo-Cell International, Inc.
  • Cryo-Cell International’s Pricing
  • CryoHoldco
  • Cryoviva Biotech Pvt. Ltd
  • Differences between Tooth Cells and Umbilical Cord Cells
  • EBMT Transplant Activity
  • European Society for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation (EBMT
  • FamiCord Group
  • FDA-Approved Sterile Collection Bags
  • Financial Results of the Company
  • GeneCell International
  • Global Collaboration
  • Global Cord Blood Corporation (GCBC)
  • HealthBaby Hong Kong
  • HEMAFUND
  • Hub of Transplant Network
  • Insception Lifebank
  • Laboratory Services
  • Leukopak
  • LifebankUSA
  • LifeCell International Pvt. Ltd.
  • Likelihood of a Matched Donor on Be the Match by Ethnic Background
  • Maze Cord Blood Laboratories
  • Medicare Clinical Trials and Studies
  • MiracleCord, Inc.
  • Mobilized Leukopak
  • MVE Liquid Nitrogen System
  • New England Cord Blood Bank, Inc.
  • New York Cord Blood Center (NYBC)
  • NextGen Collection System
  • Other Trials
  • PacifiCord
  • Partners of Be the Match
  • Personalized Cord Blood Processing
  • Placental Banking
  • Placental Tissue 2.0
  • Processing Method
  • Products
  • ReeLabs Pvt. Ltd.
  • ScellCare
  • Scientific Working Committees
  • Search & Match Service
  • Smart Cells International, Ltd.
  • Spinal Cord Injury Phase II
  • Stem Cell Cryobank
  • StemCyte Sponsored Clinical Trials
  • StemCyte, Inc.
  • the Company’s Business
  • ToothScell
  • TotiCyte Technology
  • Transcell Biolife
  • ViaCord
  • Vita 34 AG
  • Whole Blood
  • World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA)
  • Worldwide Network for Blood & Marrow Transplantation (WBMT)
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

The content and statistics contained within the publisher's reports are compiled using a broad range of sources, as described below.

Input Sources

  • Clinical Trial Databases (ClinicalTrials.gov, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, European Union Clinical Trials Register, Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, Others)
  • Scientific Publication Databases (PubMed, Highwire Press, Google Scholar)
  • Patent Databases (United States Patent and Trade Office, World Intellectual Property Organization, Google Patent Search)
  • Grant Funding Databases (RePORT Database, CIRM, MRC, Wellcome Trust - UK, Others)
  • Product Launch Announcements (Trade Journals, Google News)
  • Industry Events (Google News, Google Alerts, Press Releases)
  • Company News (SEC Filings, Investor Publications, Historical Performance)
  • Social Analytics (Google Adwords, Google Trends, Twitter, Topsy.com, Hashtagify.me, BuzzSumo.com)
  • Interviews with Stem Cell Industry Leaders

Research & Analysis Methodologies

The publisher employs the following techniques for deriving its market research:

  • Historical Databases: As the first and only market research firm to specialize in the stem cell industry, the publisher has 13+ years of historical data on each segment of the stem cell the industry. This provides an extremely rare and robust database for establishing market size determinations, as well as making future market predictions.
  • Prolific Interviews with Industry Leaders: As the global leader in stem cell industry data, the publisher has interviewed hundreds of leaders from across the stem cell industry, including the CEO of FUJIFILM CDI, FUJIFILM Irvine Scientific, Pluristem Therapies, Celularity, and many others.
  • Industry Relationships: The research team and its President/Founder, Cade Hildreth, Chair and present at a wide range of stem cell industry events, including Phacilitate's Advanced Therapies Week, World Stem Cell Summit (WSCS), Perinatal Stem Cell Society Congress, AABB's International Cord Blood Symposium (ICBS), and other events hosted within the U.S. and worldwide.
  • Global Integrated Feedback: Because the publisher maintains the world's largest stem cell industry news site that is read by nearly a million unique readers per year and the company has large social media audiences (25.7K+ followers on Linked, 21.2K+ followers on Twitter, and 4.3K+ followers on Facebook), the publisher is able to publish content relevant to the industry and receive immediate feedback/input from a global community of readers. In short, the publisher's data is crowd-sourced from market participants worldwide, including those in diverse geographic regions.
  • Preliminary Research: In addition to the interviews described above, the publisher conducts market surveys, executes social media polls, and aggregates market data from stem cell industry announcements, press releases, and corporate filings/presentations.
  • Secondary Research: The publisher summarizes, collects and synthesizes existing market research that is relevant to the market area of interest.
  • Future Projections: Using the resources described above, the publisher is uniquely positioned to make future projections about market size, market growth by segment, market trends, technology evolution, funding activities (financing rounds, M&A, and IPOs), and importantly, market leadership (market share by company).
 

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