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The Autonomous Vehicle Revolution: How It Will Affect the Automotive Sector

  • ID: 3145285
  • Report
  • Region: Global
  • 208 pages
  • Autelligence
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Authoritative overview of the current state of the autonomous car and its impact on the automotive industry – innovations, technology, legislation, business models, and innovation and activity profiles of significant industry players, both OEMs, suppliers, and non-automotive

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Aisin Seiki
  • Continental
  • Ford
  • Here
  • Omron
  • Valeo
  • MORE
The pace of progress to automate cars over the last few years has been startling. The way that consumers interact with cars as well as the way that they operate will transform most functions in road vehicles, in small as well as major ways – but it is not yet clear exactly how as Dieter Zetsche, chairman of Daimler and head of Mercedes-Benz Cars states, “Anyone who focuses solely on the technology has not yet grasped how autonomous driving will change our society”.

The “Digitales Testfeld Autobahn” in January 2015 was important for Germany (and Europe) to ensure that the European automotive industry does not become a follower and lose control of its destiny in the automotive marketplace. Europe needs to address and master new technology and its implications, in the face of innovation from outside and inside the industry in the United States and Asia, in an effort to maintain its leading position in automotive technology.

OEMs and suppliers throughout the automotive sector know that it is time for executives and companies in the industry to do their homework and think through the implications of this potentially revolutionary change that is the autonomous car. Whether fully driverless or not the technology has tremendous implications for the hardware and software that control the operations of the vehicle, the way they are specified and developed.

“Anyone who focuses solely on the technology has not yet grasped how autonomous driving will change our society” – Dieter Zetsche, chairman of Daimler and head of Mercedes-Benz Cars

It has major implications for the way cars communicate with the outside world, with each other, and with the driver or occupants. It has implications for the functions that drivers and car owners expect on their vehicles.

And ultimately because it affects the way consumers interact with vehicles, it has implications for interior and exterior design, and in the end for all the major hardware areas of the vehicles – chassis, powertrain and transmission.

Report coverage:

- Timeline for the development of innovations in the field of the autonomous car, to give a clear perspective on what has been happening.
- Modifications and adaptation in mature areas of the vehicle technology, as well as disruptive new ideas.
- Regulation, risk and litigation
- Enabling technology
- Automotive network design
- Software, Sensors, Human/machine interface
- Industry dynamics and business models
- Profiles innovations and activities of a large number of the significant players – OEMS and suppliers – active in the field, including companies new to the automotive space.

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FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Aisin Seiki
  • Continental
  • Ford
  • Here
  • Omron
  • Valeo
  • MORE
Chapter 1. Introduction

- Introduction
- Consumer acceptance

Chapter 2. The evolution of the autonomous car

- Towards a driverless future
- ADAS: Enabling the next level

Chapter 3. Regulation, risk and litigation

- Reducing crash frequency
- The liability trap
- Cost and convenience from a policy perspective

Chapter 4. Enabling Technology

-- Communications
- The Connected Vehicle Programme
- CAR 2 CAR

-- Automotive network design
- Network types and design
- Systems Engineering
- CAN
- LIN
- Ethernet
- FlexRay
- Ethernet or FlexRay?
- MOST

-- Software
- Coping with growing complexity
- AUTOSAR
- GENIVI Alliance
- AutoLinQ
- Microsoft Auto
- ElectroBit
- JasPar
- Robot Operating System (ROS)

- Domain Controller approach

-- Sensors
- Infrared
- Radar
- Lidar
- Camera systems
- Ultrasonic sensors
- Night vision enhancement
- Clustered sensors, sensor modules and sensor fusion

-- Human machine interface/ driver vehicle interface

-- Mapping and position acquisition

Chapter 5. Industry dynamics and business models
- Incremental or disruptive?
- Owning a car or buying time?
- Value chain development

Chapter 6. Effects on traditional vehicle components and systems

- Powertrain
- Chassis systems
- Interior
- Exterior

Chapter 7. Appendix – Tables of recent announcements and trials

Chapter 8. Company Profiles

- Aisin Seiki
- Apple
- Baidu
- BMW
- Continental
- Daimler
- Delphi
- Denso
- Ford
- General Motors
- Google
- Hella
- Here
- Hyundai Motors
- Jaguar Land Rover
- Mobileye
- Omron
- Smarteye
- Toyota
- TRW
- Valeo
- Velodyne
- Visteon
- Volkswagen
- Volvo

Table of tables

Table 1: US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) definition of automation levels
Table 2: Bus and communication standards comparison
Table 3: The role of digital mapping in providing sensor type information for ADAS systems
Table 4: Key operational and investment considerations for stakeholders within the autonomous vehicle value chain
Table 5: Strategic considerations for key stakeholders in the autonomous vehicle value chain
Table 6: Recent OEM and supplier announcements and NHTSA level
Table 7: Summary of autonomous vehicle technology trials announced 2013 – 2015

Table of figures

Figure 1: When will each OEM bring an automated car to market
Figure 2: Comparison between autonomous car level classifications
Figure 3: Various predictions about autonomous car availability
Figure 4: Automated driving requires systems expertise
Figure 5: Consumer levels of trust for automated vehicles
Figure 6: ADAS overall market value by system type
Figure 6: Legal situation for driverless cars within the US
Figure 7: Electrical power requirements versus time
Figure 8: Examples of automotive sensor applications
Figure 9: Market segmentation development for in-vehicle networks
Figure 10: Cost versus speed for automotive communication standards
Figure 11: Uses for the various communication standards
Figure 12: A schematic representation of the FlexRay architecture
Figure 13: A MOST Infotainment system in a heterogeneous networking environment
Figure 14: AUTOSAR software architecture showing components and interfaces
Figure 15: AUTOSAR membership
Figure 16: Typical existing automotive domain characteristics
Figure 17: Domain requirements for autonomous driving
Figure 18: High level architecture building blocks for autonomous vehicles
Figure 19: High performance domain control ECUs can simplify overall network complexity
Figure 20: Estimated sensor market size ($ billion)
Figure 21: A slip control system ECU with integrated inertial control sensors
Figure 22: Fusing multiple sensor information for driver assistance systems
Figure 23: A schematic showing the operation of Delphi’s electronic scanning radar
Figure 24: Volvo XC90 features Delphi’s RACam system, enabling a wide range of active safety features
Figure 25: Evolution of Bosch radar sensors
Figure 26: Relative importance of technologies in autonomous cars
Figure 27: A Bosch schematic representation of its stereo camera system
Figure 28: Bosch stereo video sensor package
Figure 29: BMW X5 night vision display
Figure 30: Hella’s active night vision system
Figure 31: Image showing pedestrian using visual and IR
Figure 32: Image showing highlighted animals
Figure 33: Mercedes-Benz Active Night View Assist with Spotlight Function
Figure 34: Audi Night Vision system
Figure 35: The effects of low and high spatial resolution (4 GHz vs 79GHz)
Figure 36: Progress towards a global harmonized 79Hz radar frequency
Figure 37: Aggregate volume for radar sensors supplied by Bosch
Figure 38: Top four HMI research questions in need of investigation
Figure 39: High definition mapping from Nokia HERE
Figure 40: A schematic of the map integration concept developed by the MAPS&ADAS sub-project
Figure 41: Shares of the autonomous car value chain
Figure 42: Potential commercial risks and opportunities with autonomous vehicles
Figure 44: Powertrain development roadmap to 2050
Figure 45: Chassis systems evolution
Figure 46: Interior connectivity
Figure 47: Mercedes-Benz F015 concept interior
Figure 48: Mercedes-Benz F015 concept interior

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- Aisin Seiki
- Apple
- Baidu
- BMW
- Continental
- Daimler
- Delphi
- Denso
- Ford
- General Motors
- Google
- Hella
- Here
- Hyundai Motors
- Jaguar Land Rover
- Mobileye
- Omron
- Smarteye
- Toyota
- TRW
- Valeo
- Velodyne
- Visteon
- Volkswagen
- Volvo

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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