The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention. 2nd Edition

  • ID: 3939440
  • Book
  • Region: Global
  • 848 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention, 2nd Edition, presents a series of readings that consider the individual and societal factors that lead to suicide, it addresses ways these factors may be mitigated, and presents the most up–to–date evidence for effective suicide prevention approaches. 

  • An updated reference that shows why effective suicide prevention can only be achieved by understanding the many reasons why people choose to end their lives
  • Gathers together contributions from more than 100 of the world’s leading authorities on suicidal behavior—many of them new to this edition
  • Considers suicide from epidemiological, psychological, clinical, sociological, and neurobiological perspectives, providing a holistic understanding of the subject
  • Describes the most up–to–date, evidence–based research and practice from across the globe, and explores its implications across countries, cultures, and the lifespan
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Notes on Contributors xi

Introduction 1Rory C. O’Connor and Jane Pirkis

Part I Suicidal Determinants and Frameworks 9

1 Challenges to Defining and Classifying Suicide and Suicidal Behaviors 11Morton M. Silverman

2 International Perspectives on the Epidemiology and Etiology of Suicide and Self–Harm 36Kirsten Windfuhr, Sarah Steeg, Isabelle M. Hunt, and Navneet Kapur

3 Self–Harm: Extent of the Problem and Prediction of Repetition 61Ella Arensman, Eve Griffin, and Paul Corcoran

4 Major Mood Disorders and Suicidal Behavior 74Zoltán Rihmer and Peter Döme

5 Schizophrenia, Other Psychotic Disorders, and Suicidal Behavior 93Antoine Desîlets, Myriam Labossière, Alexander McGirr, and Gustavo Turecki

6 Substance Use Disorders and Suicidal Behavior: A Conceptual Model 110Kenneth R. Conner and Mark A. Ilgen

7 Personality Disorders and Suicidality 124Joel Paris

8 The Association Between Physical Illness/Medical Conditions and Suicide Risk 133Maurizio Pompili, Alberto Forte, Alan L. Berman, and Dorian A. Lamis

9 Relationships of Genes and Early–Life Experience to the Neurobiology of Suicidal Behavior 149J. John Mann and Dianne Currier

10 Understanding the Suicidal Brain: A Review of Neuropsychological Studies of Suicidal Ideation and Behavior 170Kees van Heeringen and Stijn Bijttebier

11 Visualizing the Suicidal Brain: Neuroimaging and Suicide Prevention  188Katherin Sudol and Maria A. Oquendo

12 Present Status and Future Prospects of the Interpersonal–Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior 206Christopher R. Hagan, Jessica D. Ribeiro, and Thomas E. Joiner

13 The Integrated Motivational–Volitional Model of Suicidal Behavior: An Update 220Rory C. O’Connor, Seonaid Cleare, Sarah Eschle, Karen Wetherall, and Olivia J. Kirtley

14 Sociological Perspectives on Suicide: A Review and Analysis of Marital and Religious Integration 241Steven Stack and Augustine J. Kposowa

15 Inequalities and Suicidal Behavior 258Stephen Platt

16 Economic Recession, Unemployment, and Suicide 284David Gunnell and Shu–Sen Chang

Part II Intervention, Treatment, and Care 301

17 Evidence–Based Prevention and Treatment of Suicidal Behavior in Children and Adolescents 303Yari Gvion and Alan Apter

18 Prevention and Treatment of Suicidality in Older Adults 323Diego De Leo and Urška Arnautovska

19 Therapeutic Alliance and the Therapist 346Konrad Michel

20 Clinical Care of Self–Harm Patients: An Evidence–Based Approach 362Keith Hawton and Kate E. A. Saunders

21 After the Suicide Attempt—The Need for Continuity and Quality of Care  387Lars Mehlum and Erlend Mork

22 Management of Suicidal Risk in Emergency Departments: A Clinical Perspective 403Simon  Hatcher

23 Treating the Suicidal Patient: Cognitive Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy 416Nadine A. Chang, Shari Jager–Hyman, Gregory K. Brown, Amy Cunningham, and Barbara Stanley

24 Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) 431David A. Jobes, Katherine Anne Comtois, Lisa A. Brenner, Peter M. Gutierrez, and Stephen S. O’Connor

25 Modes of Mind and Suicidal Processes 450J. Mark G. Williams, Danielle S. Duggan, Catherine Crane, Silvia R. Hepburn, Emily Hargus, and Bergljot Gjelsvik

26 Brief Contact Interventions: Current Evidence and Future Research Directions 466Allison J. Milner and Gregory L. Carter

27 Delivering Online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Interventions to Reduce Suicide Risk 480Ad Kerkhof and Bregje van Spijker

28 Helplines, Tele–Web Support Services, and Suicide Prevention 490Alan Woodward and Clare Wyllie

Part III Suicide Prevention: Bringing Together Evidence, Policy, and Practice 505

29 Suicide Prevention in Low– and Middle–Income Countries 507Lakshmi Vijayakumar and Michael Phillips

30 Suicide in Asia: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention 524Murad M. Khan, Nargis Asad, and Ehsanullah Syed

31 Cultural Factors in Suicide Prevention 541Lai Fong Chan and Maniam Thambu

32 Suicide Prevention Strategies: Case Studies from Across the Globe 556Gergö Hadlaczky, Danuta Wasserman, Christina W. Hoven, Donald J. Mandell, and Camilla Wasserman

33 Rurality and Suicide 569Cameron R. Stark, Vincent Riordan, and Nadine Dougall

34 Why Mental Illness is a Risk Factor for Suicide: Implications for Suicide Prevention 594Brian L. Mishara and François Chagnon

35 Suicide Prevention Through Restricting Access to Suicide Means and Hotspots 609Ying–Yeh Chen, Kevin Chien–Chang Wu,Yun Wang, and Paul S. F. Yip

36 Reducing Suicide Without Affecting Underlying Mental Health: Theoretical Underpinnings and a Review of the Evidence Base Linking the Availability of Lethal Means and Suicide 637Deborah Azrael and Matthew J. Miller

37 Surviving the Legacy of Suicide 663Onja T. Grad and Karl Andriessen

38 Suicide Prevention Through Personal Experience 681DeQuincy A. Lezine

39 Time to Change Direction in Suicide Research 696Heidi Hjelmeland and Birthe Loa Knizek

40 Suicide Research Methods and Designs 710Catherine R. Glenn, Joseph C. Franklin, Jaclyn C. Kearns, Elizabeth C. Lanzillo, and Matthew K. Nock

41 School–Based Suicide Prevention Programs 725Lynda Kong, Jitender Sareen, and Laurence Y. Katz

42 Media Influences on Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors 743Jane Pirkis, Katherine Mok, Jo Robinson, and Merete Nordentoft

43 Suicide Clusters 758Jo Robinson, Jane Pirkis, and Rory C. O’Connor

44 Making an Economic Case for Investing in Suicide Prevention: Quo Vadis? 775David McDaid

Index 791

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Rory O′Connor is Professor of Health Psychology at the University of Glasgow and Past President of the International Academy of Suicide Research. O′Connor leads the Suicidal Behaviour Research Laboratory at Glasgow, one of the leading suicide and self–harm research groups in the UK. He has published extensively in the field of suicide and self–harm, and is also Deputy Chief Editor of Archives of Suicide Research, an Associate Editor of Suicide and Life–Threatening Behavior, and a member of the editorial board of Crisis.

Jane Pirkis is the Director of the Centre for Mental Health in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne, and General Secretary of the International Association for Suicide Prevention. She has published extensively on suicide and its prevention.

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