Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. Myths and Realities - Product Image

Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. Myths and Realities

  • ID: 4032111
  • Book
  • 370 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Virtual and Augmented Reality have existed for a long time but were stuck to the research world or to some large manufacturing companies. With the appearance of low–cost devices, it is expected a number of new applications, including for the general audience. This book aims at making a statement about those novelties as well as distinguishing them from the complexes challenges they raise by proposing real use cases, replacing those recent evolutions through the VR/AR dynamic and by providing some perspective for the years to come.
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Preface xi

Introduction xvBruno ARNALDI, Pascal GUITTON and Guillaume MOREAU

Chapter 1. New Applications 1
Bruno ARNALDI, Stéphane COTIN, Nadine COUTURE, Jean–Louis DAUTIN, Valérie GOURANTON, François GRUSON and Domitile LOURDEAUX

1.1. New industrial applications 1

1.1.1. Virtual reality in industry 1

1.1.2. Augmented reality and industrial applications 3

1.1.3. VR–AR for industrial renewal   4

1.1.4. And what about augmented reality?   12

1.2. Computer–assisted surgery 14

1.2.1. Introduction 14

1.2.2. Virtual reality and simulation for learning   16

1.2.3. Augmented reality and intervention planning   21

1.2.4. Augmented reality in surgery   26

1.2.5. Current conditions and future prospects   31

1.3. Sustainable cities 32

1.3.1. Mobility aids in an urban environment   33

1.3.2. Building and architecture 37

1.3.3. Cities and urbanism 41

1.3.4. Towards sustainable urban systems   46

1.4. Innovative, integrative and adaptive societies   48

1.4.1. Education 48

1.4.2. Arts and cultural heritage 54

1.4.3. Conclusion 60

1.5. Bibliography 61

Chapter 2. The Democratization of VR–AR   73
Sébastien KUNTZ, Richard KULPA and Jérôme ROYAN

2.1. New equipment 73

2.1.1. Introduction 73

2.1.2. Positioning and orientation devices   74

2.1.3. Restitution devices 82

2.1.4. Technological challenges and perspectives   100

2.1.5. Conclusions on new equipment   109

2.2. New software 111

2.2.1. Introduction 111

2.2.2. Developing 3D applications   113

2.2.3. Managing peripheral devices   116

2.2.4. Dedicated VR–AR software solutions   119

2.2.5. Conclusion 120

2.3. Bibliography 121

Chapter 3. Complexity and Scientific Challenges   123
Ferran ARGELAGUET SANZ, Bruno ARNALDI, Jean–Marie BURKHARDT, Géry CASIEZ, Stéphane DONIKIAN, Florian GOSSELIN, Xavier GRANIER, Patrick LE CALLET, Vincent LEPETIT, Maud MARCHAL, Guillaume MOREAU, Jérôme PERRET and Toinon VIGIER

3.1. Introduction: complexity 123

3.1.1. Physical model and detecting collisions   124

3.1.2. Populating 3D environments: single virtual human to a surging crowd 130

3.1.3. The difficulty of making 3D interaction natural   137

3.1.4. The difficulty of synthesizing haptic feedback   141

3.2. The real virtual relationship in augmented reality   150

3.2.1. Acquisition and restitution equipment   151

3.2.2. Pose computation 152

3.2.3. Realistic rendering 156

3.3. Complexity and scientific challenges of 3D interaction 158

3.3.1. Introduction 158

3.3.2. Complexity and challenges surrounding the 3D interaction loop 158

3.3.3. Challenge 1: sensory–motor actions for interaction 159

3.3.4. Challenge 2: multisensory feedback   163

3.3.5. Challenge 3: users and perception   166

3.3.6. Conclusion 167

3.4. Visual perception 168

3.4.1. A glossary of terms related to unease, fatigue and physical discomfort 168

3.4.2. Display factors 173

3.4.3. Conclusion 179

3.5. Evaluation 179

3.5.1. Objectives and scope of this section   179

3.5.2. Evaluation: a complex problem   180

3.5.3. Evaluation using studies with human subjects   184

3.5.4. Drawbacks to overcome 193

3.5.5. Evolutions in measuring performance and behavior, characterizing participants   195

3.5.6. Conclusion and perspectives   200

3.6. Bibliography 201

Chapter 4. Towards VE that are More Closely Related to the Real World 217
Géry CASIEZ, Xavier GRANIER, Martin HACHET, Vincent LEPETIT, Guillaume MOREAU and Olivier NANNIPIERI

4.1. Tough scientific challenges for AR   218

4.1.1. Choosing a display device   . 218

4.1.2. Spatial localization 221

4.2. Topics in AR that are rarely or never approached 223

4.2.1. Introduction 223

4.2.2. Hybridization through a screen or HMD   224

4.3. Spatial augmented reality 227

4.3.1. Hybridization of the real world and the virtual world 227

4.3.2. Current evolutions 228

4.4. Presence in augmented reality   . 229

4.4.1. Is presence in reality the model for presence in virtual environments? 229

4.4.2. Mixed reality: an end to the real versus virtual binary? 231

4.4.3. From mixed reality to mixed presence   231

4.4.4. Augmented reality: a total environment   232

4.5. 3D interaction on tactile surfaces   233

4.5.1. 3D interaction 234

4.5.2. 3D interaction on tactile surfaces   236

4.6. Bibliography 240

Chapter 5. Scientific and Technical Prospects   247
Caroline BAILLARD, Philippe GUILLOTEL, Anatole LÉCUYER, Fabien LOTTE, Nicolas MOLLET, Jean–Marie NORMAND and Gaël SEYDOUX

5.1. The promised revolution in the field of entertainment 247

5.1.1. Introduction 247

5.1.2. Defining a new, polymorphic immersive medium 248

5.1.3. Promised experiences 251

5.1.4. Prospects 255

5.2. Brain–computer interfaces 258

5.2.1. Brain–computer interfaces: introduction and definitions 258

5.2.2. What BCIs cannot do 260

5.2.3. Working principle of BCIs   . 261

5.2.4. Current applications of BCIs   263

5.2.5. The future of BCIs 268

5.3. Alternative perceptions in virtual reality   269

5.3.1. Introduction 269

5.3.2. Pseudo–sensory feedback 271

5.3.3. Alternative perception of movement   275

5.3.4. Altered perception of one s body   278

5.3.5. Conclusion 283

5.4. Bibliography 284

Chapter 6. The Challenges and Risks of Democratization of VR–AR 289
Philippe FUCHS

6.1. Introduction 289

6.2. Health and comfort problems 292

6.2.1. The different problems 292

6.2.2. Sensorimotor incoherences   . 293

6.3. Solutions to avoid discomfort and unease   297

6.3.1. Presentation of the process   . 297

6.3.2. Mitigation of the impact on visuo–vestibular incoherence 297

6.3.3. Removing visuo–vestibular incoherence by modifying the functioning of the interaction paradigm   298

6.3.4. Removing visuo–vestibular incoherence by modifying interfaces 299

6.3.5. Levels of difficulty in adapting   299

6.4. Conclusion 300

6.5. Bibliography 301

Conclusion 303Bruno ARNALDI, Pascal GUITTON and Guillaume MOREAU

Postface 309Bruno ARNALDI, Pascal GUITTON and Guillaume MOREAU

Glossary 315

List of Authors 317

Index   321

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Bruno Arnaldi
Pascal Guitton
Guillaume Moreau
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