Knowledge Management. The Creative Loop

  • ID: 4489149
  • Book
  • 242 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Knowledge management is a strategic issue for companies, and international standards such as ISO recently integrate it into its requirements. However, it is still an ill–defined concept, and methodologies to implement it are not very well known. This book is the result of over twenty years of research in different labs and application in a wide range of public or private companies around the world. It gives a global and coherent view both from the theoretical and practical point of views.

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Preface  ix

Part 1 Theoretical Elements 1

Chapter 1 A Knowledge Value Chain      3

1.1 Introduction   3

1.2 Different KVCs  4

1.3 The DIKW model  8

1.4 KVC and management 13

1.5 Transformation processes in the KVC     15

1.6 Practical application  19

1.7 Conclusion   22

Chapter 2 The Knowledge Capital of a Company    23

2.1 Introduction   23

2.1.1 The accumulation of knowledge      23

2.1.2 The company as knowledge producer     24

2.2 Modeling a company as a knowledge producer    25

2.2.1 Systemic modeling 25

2.2.2 The black box model 26

2.2.3 The division of labor model      27

2.2.4 The informational model      27

2.2.5 The knowledge capital model      28

2.2.6 The knowledge capital and knowledge actors model   31

2.2.7 Integration of customer knowledge and external knowledge into the AIK model     33

2.3 The operators of the AIK model      35

2.3.1 The Wenger operator 35

2.3.2 The Nonaka operators 35

2.3.3 Integration of the Nonaka theory into the AIK model   37

2.4 Tacit/explicit knowledge and knowledge communities   39

2.5 Mapping as a modeling tool to steer the AIK system    41

2.6 Practical application  43

2.7 Conclusion   45

Chapter 3 The Structure of Knowledge     47

3.1 Introduction   47

3.2 The semiotic triangle of knowledge      48

3.3 The systemic triangle of knowledge      52

3.4 The knowledge macroscope 54

3.4.1 Knowledge and information      55

3.4.2 Knowledge and meaning      56

3.4.3 Knowledge and context 57

3.5 Practical application  59

3.6 Conclusion   64

Chapter 4 Shannon s Theory of Knowledge     65

4.1 Introduction   65

4.2 Some definitions and notations      66

4.2.1 The basic unit of knowledge      66

4.2.2 Measuring knowledge 68

4.2.3 Quantity of knowledge in a corpus     69

4.3 Measurement of the quantity of information in a corpus   70

4.4 Measurement of the quantity of meaning in a corpus    75

4.4.1 Definitions and notations      75

4.4.2 Quantitative characterization of semantic graphs: Gurevich entropy  76

4.5 Measurement of usage context in a corpus     83

4.5.1 Introduction  83

4.5.2 Social networks  84

4.5.3 Hierarchical small–world networks     86

4.5.4 Scale–free networks 89

4.5.5 Quantitative characterization of the usage graph of a corpus  90

4.6 Practical application  91

4.7 Conclusion   93

Part 2 Practical Elements 97

Chapter 5 A New Approach to KM   99

5.1 Introduction   99

5.2 Two examples of KM standardization     100

5.2.1 KM and international standardization     100

5.2.2 KM in the nuclear domain      101

5.3 The French Knowledge Management Club     103

5.4 Conclusion   105

Chapter 6 A Framework for Knowledge–based KM    107

6.1 Introduction   107

6.2 The Daisy Model  108

6.3 Building a KM process framework      110

6.4 Conclusion   113

Chapter 7 KM: From Strategy to Implementation    115

7.1 Introduction   115

7.2 Framing a KM project 116

7.2.1 The objectives  116

7.2.2 Responsibilities and roles      117

7.2.3 Resources  119

7.2.4 Internal communication 119

7.2.5 Connections between KM and other company issues   119

7.2.6 Other subjects of interest to consider     121

7.3 Implementing the KM project      121

7.4 Monitoring the KM system 124

7.5 Conclusion   125

Chapter 8 Analyzing Knowledge Capital and Elaborating a KM Plan  127

8.1 Introduction   127

8.2 Tools for analyzing knowledge capital     128

8.2.1 Maps   128

8.2.2 The knowledge criticality analysis grid     129

8.3 The knowledge capital analysis process     132

8.3.1 Step 1: analyzing critical capacities     132

8.3.2 Step 2: analyzing critical knowledge     134

8.3.3 Step 3: strategic alignment      137

8.3.4 Step 4: elaborating a KM plan      139

8.4 Conclusion   142

Chapter 9 Implementing the KM Plan      143

9.1 Introduction   143

9.2 Knowledge organization 144

9.2.1 Tangible resources (explicit knowledge)     144

9.2.2 Intangible resources (tacit knowledge)     145

9.2.3 New knowledge resource additions     146

9.3 Knowledge codification 147

9.3.1 Lessons learned  148

9.3.2 Knowledge–based documents      149

9.3.3 Knowledge books 159

9.4 Knowledge sharing  179

9.4.1 Knowledge communities or communities of practice   179

9.4.2 Knowledge transfer 184

9.5 Knowledge search  193

9.5.1 Knowledge search and information retrieval    194

9.5.2 The knowledge search process      196

9.5.3 The challenge of KM in knowledge search    198

9.6 Knowledge creation  200

9.6.1 Knowledge creation and innovation     200

9.6.2 Knowledge–based innovation      202

9.6.3 Evaluating the maturity of the innovation process   207

9.7 Conclusion   209

Bibliography 211

Index  219

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Jean–Louis Ermine
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