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Developmental Human Behavioral Epigenetics. Principles, Methods, Evidence, and Future Directions. Translational Epigenetics Volume 23

  • Book
  • November 2020
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
  • ID: 5029569

Developmental Human Behavioral Epigenetics: Principles, Methods, Evidence, and Future Directions, Volume 23, a new volume in the Translational Epigenetics series, offers the first systematic account of theoretical G79 frameworks, methodological approaches, findings, and future directions in the field of human behavioral epigenetics. Featuring contributions from leading scientists and international researchers, this book provides a comprehensive overview of human behavioral epigenetics, with a close examination of evidence gathered to-date from animal models, challenges of human-based research and clinical translation, pathways towards drug discovery, and next steps in research.

Areas of focus include prenatal stress exposures, preterm behavioral epigenetics, intergenerational exposures, trauma and neglect, socio-economic conditions, maternal caregiving and attachment, study design, and epigenetics and psychotherapy.

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Table of Contents

SECTION I Introduction CHAPTER 1 Principles of epigenetics and DNA methylation CHAPTER 2 From animal to human epigenetics CHAPTER 3 An overview of developmental behavioral genetics

SECTION II Behavioral epigenetics in action CHAPTER 4 Prenatal exposures and behavioral epigenetics in human infants and children CHAPTER 5 Applying behavioral epigenetic principles to preterm birth and early stress exposure CHAPTER 6 Long-term epigenetic effects of parental caregiving CHAPTER 7 Intergenerational transmission of stress-related epigenetic regulation CHAPTER 8 The role of protective caregiving in epigenetic regulation in human infants CHAPTER 9 Embedding early experiences into brain function: Perspectives from behavioral epigenetics

Authors

Livio Provenzi Child Neurology and Psychiatry Unit, IRCCS Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy.. Dr. Livio Provenzi received his master's degree in clinical psychology (2008) and PhD in psychology (2016) at the Università Cattolica in Milan, Italy. Since 2010, he has worked as a researcher and clinical psychologist at the 0-3 Center for the at-Risk Infant of the Scientific Institute IRCCS Eugenio Medea in Bosisio Parini, Italy. He has published scientific papers in the areas of developmental psychology, pediatrics, nursing sciences, neurosciences, and psychobiology. His research interests include developmental psychobiology during the first months of life, including preterm birth, socio-emotional development and stress regulation, mother-infant interaction and regulation, behavioral genetics, and epigenetics. Rosario Montirosso 0-3 Center for the At-Risk Infant, Scientific Institute IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini (Lecco), Italy.. Dr. Rosario Montirosso is a research scientist, and clinical and developmental psychologist. He received his master's degree in clinical psychology (1987) at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in Rome, Italy and received his Ph.D. in 1991 from the Institute for Research on Intrapsychic and Relational Processes, IRPIR, Rome, Italy. Since 1989, he has worked as a researcher and clinical psychologist at the Scientific Institute IRCCS "Eugenio Medea” in Bosisio Parini, Italy. He has published scientific papers in the areas of developmental psychology, pediatrics, nursing sciences, neurosciences, and psychobiology. He is the Director of 0-3 Centre for the at-Risk Infant, a Unit of the Scientific Institute ''E. Medea'', Bosisio Parini. His scientific work at the 0-3 Center has also lead to the establishment of international collaborations with leading researchers in neuroscience and developmental psychobiology, including Pier Francesco Ferrari, Masha Gartstein, Ruth Grunau, Beatriz Linhares, Lynne Murray, Tim Oberlander and Ed Tronick.Dr. Rosario Montirosso is a research scientist, and clinical and developmental psychologist. He received his master's degree in clinical psychology (1987) at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in Rome, Italy and received his Ph.D. in 1991 from the Institute for Research on Intrapsychic and Relational Processes, IRPIR, Rome, Italy. Since 1989, he has worked as a researcher and clinical psychologist at the Scientific Institute IRCCS "Eugenio Medea” in Bosisio Parini, Italy. He has published scientific papers in the areas of developmental psychology, pediatrics, nursing sciences, neurosciences, and psychobiology. He is the Director of 0-3 Centre for the at-Risk Infant, a Unit of the Scientific Institute ''E. Medea'', Bosisio Parini. His scientific work at the 0-3 Center has also lead to the establishment of international collaborations with leading researchers in neuroscience and developmental psychobiology, including Pier Francesco Ferrari, Masha Gartstein, Ruth Grunau, Beatriz Linhares, Lynne Murray, Tim Oberlander and Ed Tronick.