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The Future of Forensic Science. Edition No. 1. Forensic Science in Focus

  • ID: 5226056
  • Book
  • April 2019
  • 208 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd

Offers a diverse, interdisciplinary, and eye-opening view of the future direction of forensic science 

This one-of-a-kind book is a collection of content from the Past and Current Presidents of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences - providing readers with all of their forensic science experience, knowledge, insight, and wisdom. It envisions where forensic science will be a decade from now and the impact of these emerging advances on the law (along with our place in it), emphasizing theoretical advances, innovative leads from the laboratory, and emerging technologies.

Filled with information from some of the greatest forensic minds of their generation, The Future of Forensic Science covers all of the eleven sections that comprise the AAFS. It discusses new directions in forensic anthropology, and looks at the future of such disciplines as criminalistics, forensic engineering science, forensic psychiatry and behavioral science, forensic toxicology, and forensic document examination. It also touches on the current and future state of digital and multimedia sciences.

  • Contains contributions from an eminent group of forensic science experts
  • Presents a valuable repository of forensic science experience, knowledge, insight, and wisdom
  • Offers an insightful interdisciplinary look at the future of forensic science and how it is changing forensic science for the better
  • Timed to coincide with the NIST forensic science initiative and the OSAC process 

The Future of Forensic Science is a must-have book for practicing forensic science professionals, academics, and advanced undergraduate and graduate students in forensic science. 

This book is published as part of the AAFS series ‘Forensic Science in Focus’.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

Notes on contributors xi

Series preface xix

Preface xxi

1 New directions in forensic anthropology 1
Douglas H. Ubelaker

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Detection and recovery 3

1.3 Determination of human status 4

1.4 Age at death 6

1.5 Time since death 7

1.6 Sex estimation 8

1.7 Ancestry 9

1.8 Living stature 9

1.9 Postmortem history 10

1.10 Positive identification 10

1.11 Foul play 11

1.12 Certification 12

1.13 Conclusion 13

Acknowledgments 14

References 14

2 Some thoughts on the future challenges to criminalistics 19
Ronald L. Singer

2.1 Introduction 19

2.2 Technological advances 20

2.2.1 Computers software and databases 20

2.2.2 DNA 21

2.2.3 Impression evidence 21

2.2.4 Instrumentation 22

2.3 Quality issues 23

2.3.1 NAS Report 23

2.4 Financial burdens 24

2.4.1 Seeking additional sources of grant funding 25

2.4.2 Staffing 25

2.4.3 Regionalization 26

2.4.4 Consolidation 26

2.4.5 Cost recovery 27

2.4.6 Privatization 28

Acknowledgments 29

References 29

3 Digital and multimedia sciences 31
Zeno Geradts

3.1 Introduction 31

3.2 History 33

3.3 Digital evidence 35

3.4 Damaged (mobile) devices 37

3.5 Multimedia 38

3.5.1 Deep learning (Hinton et al. 2006) 39

3.5.2 Camera identification 40

3.5.3 Other biometrics 41

3.6 Wearables and quantified self 41

3.7 Drones 41

3.8 Sensors 42

3.9 Geo satellites 42

3.10 Disasters/large scale incidents 42

3.11 Quality assurance 43

3.12 Challenges 43

References 44

4 A look at the future of forensic engineering science 49
Thomas L. Bohan

“The future”: a preface 49

4.1 Junk law in the courtroom 50

4.2 Forensic engineering sciences and needs of the modern world at large 55

Acknowledgments 58

References 58

5 General section history: look at two disciplines and a review of standards certifications and education 61
John E. Gerns

5.1 Introduction 61

5.2 Forensic veterinary science 62

5.3 Certification: introduction 66

5.4 Certification - ABMDI 66

5.5 Standards evolution - OSAC 68

5.6 Standard evolution - ASB 69

5.7 Education accreditation 70

5.8 Summary 71

Acknowledgements 72

References 72

6 The future of forensic science: hot leads in contemporary forensic research: Jurisprudence 73
Carol Henderson

6.1 Daubert’s history 75

6.2 The Daubert test 77

6.3 Questions raised by Daubert 77

6.4 The NAS report 78

6.5 The national commission on forensic science and the organization of scientific area committees 80

6.6 NCFS 80

6.7 OSAC 82

6.8 The path forward for judicial and legal education in forensic science 84

Acknowledgments 87

References 87

7 Forensic odontology 91
Robert E. Barsley

7.1 Introduction 91

7.2 Roles of the forensic odontologist 92

7.3 Current considerations 94

7.4 Identification by teeth 96

7.5 Dental age assessment 104

7.6 Bitemarks 105

7.7 Abuse and negligence 107

7.8 Closing 107

8 Opportunities and problems faced in forensic pathology 109
Edmund R. Donoghue

8.1 Opportunity: radiology technology and computer imaging 109

8.2 Threat: dropping forensic pathology training requirement for anatomic pathology 110

8.3 Threat: maintenance of certification could see some forensic pathologists unemployed 111

8.4 Threat: standards are becoming increasingly detailed and rigorous 112

8.5 Threat: forensic: overregulation by federal government and other entities 112

8.6 Conclusion 112

9 The future of forensic psychiatry and behavioral science 113
Richard Rosner

9.1 The BRAIN initiative 114

9.2 The law and the human mind 114

9.3 Correlation is NOT causation 115

9.4 Theories of consciousness 115

9.5 The hard problem of consciousness 116

9.6 Consciousness and the failure of the physical sciences 117

9.7 The problem of free will 118

9.8 The bottom line 119

References 119

10 The future of forensic document examination 121
John L. Sang Linton A. Mohammed and Carl R. McClary

10.1 What is a forensic document examiner (FDE)? 121

10.2 Origins of questioned document examination 123

10.3 Albert S. Osborn and the formation of the American Society of Questioned Document Examiners (ASQDE) 125

10.4 Ordway Hilton and the formation of American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) 126

10.5 Questioned documents and the formation of the International Association of Forensic Sciences (IAFS) 128

10.6 Key issues 128

10.6.1 Certification 128

10.6.2 Standardization 129

10.7 Standards of practice 132

10.8 The Daubert standard and FDE 135

10.9 How FDE meets Daubert 137

10.9.1 Standards 137

10.9.2 Error rate/reliability 138

10.9.3 Testing of basic principles 139

10.9.4 Peer review and publication 142

10.9.5 General acceptance in the forensic community 143

10.10 Research in FDE 144

10.10.1 Neuroscience 144

10.10.2 Eye tracking 146

10.11 Signature and handwriting verification systems 148

10.12 Automation in the forensic examination of handwriting 148

10.13 Current research 149

10.14 Conclusion 150

10.14.1 The public and how law and forensics will be shaped 150

10.14.2 Research 151

10.14.3 Research in other document examinations 151

References 152

Further readings 155

Measurement science and standards in forensic handwriting analysis – U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Symposium June 2013 presentations 157

11 Past perspectives and future directions in forensic toxicology 159
Barry K. Logan F-ABFT

11.1 Our history 159

11.2 Reflections on factors affecting our future direction 163

11.3 Facing forward 167

11.3.1 Laboratory resources and the role of the Federal Government 168

11.3.2 Standards development and harmonization of best practices 168

11.3.3 Technology 169

11.3.4 Training research and interdisciplinary collaboration 171

11.4 Conclusion 173

Acknowledgments 174

Index 175

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Daniel A. Martell
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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